Young Workers (young + worker)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Heavy Drinking, Alcohol Dependence, and Injuries at Work Among Young Workers in the United States Labor Force

ALCOHOLISM, Issue 12 2000
Mark A. Veazie
Background: To determine whether heavily drinking and alcohol-dependent workers are at higher risk of occupational injury, we analyzed the nationally representative cohort of people enrolled in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth since 1979. Methods: This analysis was restricted to the 8569 respondents in the 1989 annual interview (age 24,32) who were employed during the 6 months before the interview. We studied occupational injuries (excluding sprains or strains) reported within 6 months of the interview in 1989 (cross-sectional analysis) and 1990 (prospective analysis). Results: Among current drinkers, significant two-fold increases in the odds of injury for one or more episodes of heavy drinking were reduced to an odds ratio (OR) of 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7, 2.1) in the cross-sectional analysis and an OR of 1.6 (CI 1.0, 2.8) in the prospective analysis after adjustment for confounding. No dose-response relationship with the frequency of heavy drinking was found. Alcohol-dependent respondents were not at higher risk of injury in the cross-sectional (OR = 1.1, CI 0.7, 1.8) or prospective (OR = 1.3, CI 0.8, 2.2) analyses after adjustment for confounding. Conclusions: For young U.S. workers, common occupational injuries (excluding sprains and strains) may not be strongly associated with alcohol dependence. Confounding by other risk factors may explain much of the association between being a heavy drinker and occupational injuries in this population. [source]


Enhancing occupational health and safety in young workers: the role of social marketing

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 3 2008
Anne M. Lavack
Young workers (age 15,24) suffer work-related injury at a much higher rate than older workers, yet research on the role and effectiveness of social marketing to influence and improve workplace safety is limited. A review of the relevant literature reveals that significant gaps exist in terms of effectively using social marketing to reduce young worker injury rates. A comprehensive, multi-faceted social marketing approach is required to address young worker safety. Directing more attention toward the practice of social marketing can enhance the effectiveness of campaigns to reduce workplace injuries. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Occupational injuries to oregon workers 24 years and younger: An analysis of workers' compensation claims, 2000,2007

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 10 2010
Jaime K. Walters MPH
Abstract Background Occupational injuries to adolescents and young adults are a known public health problem. We sought to describe and estimate rates of occupational injuries to workers younger than 25 years of age in Oregon during an 8-year period. Methods Oregon workers' compensation disabling claims data (n,=,23,325) and one commercial insurance carrier's non-disabling claims data (n,=,16,153) were analyzed. Total employment from the Local Employment Dynamics of the U.S. Census Bureau and the Oregon Labor Market Information System was used as a denominator for rates. Results Injuries were more frequent among 22,24 year olds and among males, though females accounted for a higher proportion of claims in the youngest age group. The most common injury type was a sprain or strain, but lacerations and burns were more frequently reported in the 14,18 year olds. When non-disabling claims were included, the rate of injury for 14,18 year olds doubled. The overall rate of injury was 122.7/10,000 workers, but was higher in the construction, manufacturing, and transportation sectors, and in the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting sector for older teens and young adults. Conclusions Young workers continue to be at risk for occupational injuries. Our results show that specific interventions may be needed for older teen and young adult workers to reduce their rate of injury. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:984,994, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Racial Wage Differences among Young Male Job Changers: The Relative Contribution of Migration, Occupation Change, Site Characteristics, and Human Capital

GROWTH AND CHANGE, Issue 1 2006
AMY M. WOLAVER
ABSTRACT We demonstrated racial differences in the relationship between migration, location, and predicted wages for young male workers who have changed employers. An Oaxaca decomposition allowed a measuring of the contributions of migration, occupation change, site features, and human capital to the racial wage gap. Migration decreases black,white wage differences, and wage compensation for site attributes favors white householders. Constraints on occupation choice and migration dampen the ability of blacks to improve wages. Because most job changes occur in the first ten years of a career, these results on young workers give important general insights into the origins and persistence of racial wage gaps. [source]


Enhancing occupational health and safety in young workers: the role of social marketing

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 3 2008
Anne M. Lavack
Young workers (age 15,24) suffer work-related injury at a much higher rate than older workers, yet research on the role and effectiveness of social marketing to influence and improve workplace safety is limited. A review of the relevant literature reveals that significant gaps exist in terms of effectively using social marketing to reduce young worker injury rates. A comprehensive, multi-faceted social marketing approach is required to address young worker safety. Directing more attention toward the practice of social marketing can enhance the effectiveness of campaigns to reduce workplace injuries. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Reporting errors, ability heterogeneity, and returns to schooling in China

PACIFIC ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 3 2004
Haizheng Li
We identify a unique instrument to correct for the omitted ability bias. We find that the attenuation bias caused by measurement error dominates the omitted ability bias in the OLS estimation. Based on the GMM estimation, for young workers in China, the return to schooling is 15.0% overall and 16.9% for women. [source]


Hazardous task recognition among U.S. adolescents working in the retail or service industry

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 7 2010
Catherine J. Vladutiu MPH
Abstract Background Although the hazardous tasks adolescent workers perform in service and retail industries are well documented, little is known about the extent to which young workers recognize these tasks as hazardous or dangerous. Methods Using data from a nationally representative cross-sectional telephone survey conducted in 2003, we examined hazardous task recognition among 858 adolescents working in the retail or service industry. Results Approximately 13% (n,=,123) of respondents reported that they consider at least one of their job tasks to be hazardous or dangerous. Among the respondents who performed tasks known to be hazardous, very few actually recognized these tasks as being hazardous or dangerous. Conclusion Working adolescents appear to underestimate the dangers associated with work, thus increasing the potential likelihood of injury. Emphasis should be placed on eliminating or reducing hazards in the workplace while simultaneously improving young workers' recognition of the hazardous nature of many of the tasks they perform. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:686,692, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Labour Market Policy Developments in Japan: Following an Australian Lead?

THE AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 4 2005
Noel Gaston
In recent times, Japan has experienced a rapid expansion in its service sector, increases in casual and part-time employment and record unemployment. In addition, there has been an associated rise of freeters and NEETs,predominantly young workers with tenuous labour market attachment. While somewhat slow in initiating policy responses, the Japanese government responded to these structural changes by reforming its existing employment policies. In this article we argue that recent changes in the nature of Japan's labour market policies appear to have been driven by some of the same factors which led to the radical overhaul of Australia's own labour market policies. [source]


Low-Growth Equilibrium Accompanied by High Levels of Educational Attainment

THE JAPANESE ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 4 2002
Koichi Yotsuya
The paper demonstrates the low-growth trap associated with high educational attainment in an overlapping-generations model by examining the dual positive effect of senior educated workers in leading-edge technology: on technological progress and on young workers' on-the-job learning. If new technology is sufficiently productive, young workers will demand education to update technology when old, and high technological growth is sustained in the future. Conversely, if new technology is unproductive, they will demand education merely to improve the skills necessary for existing technology, and technological progress will stagnate. Nevertheless, vigorous investment in education occurs since young workers have little hope for on-the-job learning. JEL Classification Numbers: I20, J24, O33, O40. [source]


Education and Earnings in Transition: The Case of Lao*

ASIAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Issue 4 2007
Phanhpakit Onphanhdala
I28; J24; P27 This paper is a study on the returns to education in Lao, a country that has been largely neglected by the published literature. The authors found that the private rates of returns to education have risen significantly with economic transition. In particular, returns for young workers are considerably higher than for older workers. Although large earnings premiums are generally received by workers with high levels of education, the most profitable investment in education for a large number of paid employees is still the primary level. Moreover, there are the significant public,private sector wage differentials. The research findings have important implications for public sector salaries and the financing of education in Lao. [source]


INTERNAL LABOUR MARKETS: EVIDENCE FROM TWO LARGE AUSTRALIAN EMPLOYERS

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 2 2009
Andrew Seltzer
Australian firms; banks; internal labour markets; railroads; salaries This paper examines internal labour markets in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century using personnel records from the Union Bank of Australia and the Victorian Railways. Both employers hired young workers and offered them the possibility of very-long-term employment. Salaries were determined by impersonal rules, such as being attached to tenure and to position. Workers rarely received nominal pay cuts. This approach to human resources was designed to retain and motivate workers. We show that all of the classic features of internal labour markets used to describe American firms in the 1970s were present dating back to the Victorian period. [source]