Vinyl Ester Resin (vinyl + ester_resin)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Kinetic modeling of esterification of cardanol-based epoxy resin in the presence of triphenylphosphine for producing vinyl ester resin: Mechanistic rate equation

JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE, Issue 4 2010
Minakshi Sultania
Abstract In this study, cardanol-based epoxidized novolac resins and methacrylic acid were used to produce cardanol-based epoxidised novolac vinyl ester resins. The reactions were conducted under nonstoichiometric condition using triphenylphosphine as catalyst in the temperature range of 80,100C with an interval of 5C. The first-order rate equation and mechanism based rate equation were examined. Parameters were evaluated by least square method. A comparison of mechnism based rate equation and experimental data showed an excellent agreement. Finally, Arrhenius equation and activation energy were presented. The specific rate constants, based on linear regression analysis, were found to obey Arrhenius equation. The values of activation energy, frequency factor, enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of the reaction revealed that the reaction was spontaneous and irreversible and produced a highly activated complex. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2010 [source]


Preparation and properties of waterborne interpenetrating polymer networks composed of polyurethaneurea and graft vinyl ester resin

JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE, Issue 2 2009
Teng Su
Abstract Various waterborne interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) composed of polyurethaneurea (PUU) and graft vinyl ester resin were prepared from polyester polyol, dimethylolpropionic acid, isophorone diisocyanate, ethylenediamine and a well-defined graft vinyl ester resin containing butanol side chains (BO-g-VER). These anionic IPN aqueous dispersions were stable at the ambient temperature for >1 yr, and also had the excellent stability at low and high temperatures. The experimental results showed that the introduction of BO-g-VER network has not only greatly affected the particle morphology, stability and rheological behavior of these aqueous dispersions, but also rendered the films with the augmented surface hydrophobicity as well as the excellent water-resistance performance and mechanical properties. A synergistic effect was observed at a certain BO-g-VER composition (20 wt %) to give significant reinforcement to the PUU, resulting from the compatibility and/or the interpenetration between the PUU network and the BO-g-VER network. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2009 [source]


Kinetic modeling of esterification of cardanol-based epoxy resin in the presence of triphenylphosphine for producing vinyl ester resin: Mechanistic rate equation

JOURNAL OF APPLIED POLYMER SCIENCE, Issue 4 2010
Minakshi Sultania
Abstract In this study, cardanol-based epoxidized novolac resins and methacrylic acid were used to produce cardanol-based epoxidised novolac vinyl ester resins. The reactions were conducted under nonstoichiometric condition using triphenylphosphine as catalyst in the temperature range of 80,100C with an interval of 5C. The first-order rate equation and mechanism based rate equation were examined. Parameters were evaluated by least square method. A comparison of mechnism based rate equation and experimental data showed an excellent agreement. Finally, Arrhenius equation and activation energy were presented. The specific rate constants, based on linear regression analysis, were found to obey Arrhenius equation. The values of activation energy, frequency factor, enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of the reaction revealed that the reaction was spontaneous and irreversible and produced a highly activated complex. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2010 [source]


Mechanical and viscoelastic properties of semi-interpenetrating polymer networks of poly(vinyl chloride)/thermosetting resin blends

POLYMER ENGINEERING & SCIENCE, Issue 6 2000
Charles U. Pittman Jr.
Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPNs) of PVC/thermoset were prepared by premixing porous, 150 ,m diameter particles of PVC and a small quantity (from 5 to 15% by weight) of a single thermosetting liquid preresin from one of five types (e.g. methylene bis-phenyl diisocyanate (MDI), oligomeric MDI isocyanates (PAPI), toluene diisocyanate (TDI) prepolymer, epoxy, and vinyl ester resins, respectively). Two roll milling of these mixtures was followed by hot-press curing. Mechanical testing indicated that most of these blends exhibited increased tensile, impact, and flexural strengths. The strength increments were greater when going from 0 to 5% thermoset content than when going from 5 to 10% or 10 to 15% thermoset. In many cases, increasing thermoset content from 10 to 15% gave slightly decreased or unchanged tensile, impact, and flexural strengths. This behavior is in accord with a "thermoset dilution effect" in PVC. Most of these SIPN blends exhibited a tan , peak temperature lower than that for pure PVC in the glass transition region. The tan , peak temperatures were progressively lowered as the amounts of thermoset increased. Also, a single distinct peak existed in the E, curves for most of the blends. Only the PVC/epoxy (90/10) blend showed two peak maxima in E, vs. temperature curves. All blends exhibited peak E, values at a lower temperature than those of PVC which had been exposed to the same processing temperatures. These observations seem to rule out the presence of large domains of PVC, which are phase-separated from PVC/thermoset SIPN, and pure thermoset domains. A substantial amount of the added thermoset appears to exist in SIPN type phases in these five blend types. [source]