Useful Treatment (useful + treatment)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A Case of Foul Genital Odor Treated with Botulinum Toxin A

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 9 2004
Jae-Bong Lee MD
Background. Genital odor is an uncommon condition characterized by an offensive and malodorous smell in the genital area. Although the etiology of foul genital odor is multifactorial, an important cause is sweat secretion and decomposition of sweat components by bacteria. Different methods are effective in reducing body odor secondary to bromhidrosis. Conservative methods only act for a short period of time, and more invasive surgical methods carry risk of complications or are inapplicable for the genital region. Methods. A patient with localized foul odor in the genital hair bearing area was treated with botulinum toxin A. Results. Botulinum toxin A was effective in creating an odorless and anhydrous response in the genital region, and no major adverse effects were noted during a follow-up of 9 months after injection. Conclusion. Local injection of botulinum toxin A appears to be a useful treatment for foul genital odor related to sweat glands activity. [source]


Factor XI deficiency and its management

HAEMOPHILIA, Issue 2000
Bolton-Maggs
Factor XI deficiency has a more variable bleeding tendency than haemophilia A or B. Individuals with severe deficiency have only a mild bleeding tendency, which is typically provoked by surgery, but the risk of bleeding is not restricted to individuals with severe deficiency. The bleeding tendency varies between individuals with similar factor XI levels, and sometimes the bleeding tendency of an individual may vary. The reasons for this are not fully understood, although in cases of severe deficiency there is some correlation between phenotype and genotype. Factor XI is activated by thrombin. The role of factor XI in physiological processes has become clearer since this fact was discovered, and the discovery has contributed to a revised model of blood coagulation. Factor XI deficiency occurs in all racial groups, but is particularly common in Ashkenazi Jews. The factor XI gene is 23 kilobases long. Two mutations are responsible for most factor XI deficiency in the Ashkenazi population, but a number of other mutations have now been reported in other racial groups. Individuals with factor XI deficiency may need specific therapy for surgery, accidents, and dental extractions. Several therapies are available which include fresh frozen plasma, factor XI concentrates, fibrin glue, antifibrinolytic drugs, and desmopressin. Each has advantages and risks to be considered. Factor XI concentrate may be indicated for procedures with a significant risk of bleeding especially in younger patients with severe deficiency, but its use in older patients has been associated with thrombotic phenomena. If fresh frozen plasma is to be used it is preferable to obtain one of the virally inactivated products. Fibrin glue is a useful treatment which deserves further study. [source]


A randomised comparison of oral desmopressin lyophilisate (MELT) and tablet formulations in children and adolescents with primary nocturnal enuresis

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 9 2007
H. Lottmann
Summary Aims:, Desmopressin is a useful treatment for primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE), a common childhood condition that can persist into adolescence. This open-label, randomised, cross-over study evaluated the preference of children and adolescents with PNE for sublingual desmopressin oral lyophilisate (MELT) vs. tablet treatment, and the efficacy, safety, compliance and ease of use associated with each formulation. In total, 221 patients aged 5,15 years who were already receiving desmopressin tablets were randomised 1 : 1 to receive desmopressin treatment in the order MELT/tablet (n = 110) or tablet/MELT (n = 111) for 3 weeks each. Each formulation was administered in bioequivalent doses (0.2/0.4 mg tablets , 120/240 ,g MELT). Following treatment, patients were questioned regarding treatment preference. Diary card data and 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale scores were also recorded. Results:, Overall, patients preferred the MELT formulation to the tablet (56% vs. 44%; p = 0.112). This preference was age dependent (p = 0.006); patients aged < 12 years had a statistically significant preference for desmopressin MELT (p = 0.0089). Efficacy was similar for both formulations (MELT: 1.88 1.94 bedwetting episodes/week; tablet: 1.90 1.85 episodes/week). Ease of use of both formulations was high. Compliance (, 80%) was 94.5% for MELT patients vs. 88.9% for the tablet (p = 0.059). No serious/severe adverse events were reported. Conclusions:, There was an overall preference for the MELT, and a statistically significant preference for desmopressin MELT in children aged 5,11 years. Desmopressin MELT had similar levels of efficacy and safety at lower dosing levels than the tablet, and therefore facilitates early initiation of PNE treatment in children aged 5,6 years. [source]


Potential of umbilical cord blood cells for brain repair

JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, Issue 2002
P. R. Sanberg
Our laboratory is characterizing the mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) for possible therapeutic value. Studies on HUCB cells demonstrated their ability to respond to growth factors by increased expression of neural markers and down regulation of several genes associated with development of blood lines. HUCB cells were also transplanted into the subventricular zone of the developing rat brain. It was found that some of the HUCB cells responded to external factors and were able to adopt neural fates similar to endogenous stem cells. We also tested whether intravenously infused HUCB cells enter brain, survive, differentiate and improve neurological functional recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. HUCB cells were injected into the tail vein at least 24 h after stroke or TBI. Behavioral impairments were significantly improved as early as 14 days in both TBI and stroke animals, compared to controls. Injected cells entered brain and migrated into the parenchyma of the injured brain. Some of these expressed neuronal, astrocytic, or endothelial markers. Our data suggest that intravenous administration of HUCB cells can provide neural stem cells, and may be a useful treatment for brain repair. Acknowledgements:, Supported by Saneron CCEL Therapeutics, Inc. and a FL Hi-Tech Corridor Grant. [source]


Effects of N-acetylcysteine on substance use in bipolar disorder: A randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial

ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, Issue 6 2009
Michelle Bernardo
Objective: To evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on substance use in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of NAC in bipolar disorder. It is hypothesised that NAC will be superior to placebo for reducing scores on the Clinical Global Impressions scale for Substance Use (CGI-SU). Methods: Participants were randomised to a 6-months of treatment with 2 g/day NAC (n = 38) or placebo (n = 37). Substance use was assessed at baseline using a Habits instrument. Change in substance use was assessed at regular study visits using the CGI-SU. Results: Among the 75 participants 78.7% drank alcohol (any frequency), 45.3% smoked tobacco and 92% consumed caffeine. Other substances were used by fewer than six participants. Caffeine use was significantly lower for NAC-treated participants compared to placebo at week 2 of treatment but not at other study visits. Conclusions: NAC appeared to have little effect on the participants who were using substances. A larger study on a substance-using population will be necessary to determine if NAC may be a useful treatment for substance use. [source]


Effects of N -acetylcysteine on substance use in bipolar disorder: a randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial

ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, Issue 5 2009
Michelle Bernardo
Objective: To evaluate the effect of N -acetylcysteine (NAC) on substance use in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of NAC in bipolar disorder. It is hypothesised that NAC will be superior to placebo for reducing scores on the Clinical Global Impressions scale for Substance Use (CGI-SU). Methods: Participants were randomised to 6-months of treatment with 2 g/day NAC (n = 38) or placebo (n = 37). Substance use was assessed at baseline using the Habits instrument. Change in substance use was assessed at regular study visits using the CGI-SU. Results: Amongst the 75 participants 78.7% drank alcohol (any frequency), 45.3% smoked tobacco and 92% consumer caffeine. Other substances were used by fewer than six participants. Caffeine use was significantly lower for NAC-treated participants compared with placebo at week 2 of treatment but not at other study visits. Conclusion: NAC appeared to have little effect on substance use in this population. A larger study on a substance using population will be necessary to determine if NAC may be a useful treatment for substance use. [source]


Modulation of tear film protein secretion with phosphodiesterase inhibitors

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL OPHTHALMOLOGY, Issue 3 2000
Victoria Evans BOptom
ABSTRACT A double-blind randomized clinical study was conducted to determine whether nicardipine hydrochloride was a useful treatment for dry eye. We examined its effect on the tear film, ocular surface and ocular comfort. Nicardipine hydrochloride, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and pilocarpine hydrochloride were dissolved in an artificial tear vehicle and applied topically to one eye of 12 subjects on separate days. Ocular physiology, ocular comfort and tear volume were assessed. The trial was repeated with nicardipine in an aqueous gel vehicle. Tears were collected and assessed for protein concentration and protein profile, using electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Nicardipine induced conjunctival redness and symptoms of dryness and irritation. There was no change in total tear protein concentration or volume. An increase in a 68 kDa protein was observed, this was probably due to conjunctival vessel dilation and leakage of albumin. The adverse symptomatology and increased conjunctival redness experienced with nicardipine make it an undesirable treatment for dry eye. [source]