Treatment Manuals (treatment + manuals)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The manualization of a treatment programme for personality disorder

CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 1 2005
Mary McMurran
Background The advantages of manualized psychological treatments include: the promotion of evidence-based practice, the enhancement of treatment integrity, the facilitation of staff training, and the potential replicability of treatment. Argument The manualization of a multi-component, multidisciplinary treatment programme for male personality-disordered offenders is described. The background to this development is explained and the treatment setting is described briefly, followed by a description of the eight treatment manuals: (1) the treatment overview, (2) Psychoeducation focusing on personality disorder diagnosis and core beliefs, (3) Trust and Self-awareness group exercises, (4) Stop & Think! - a social problem-solving intervention, (5) Controlling Angry Aggression, (6) Controlling Substance Use, (7) Criminal Thinking/Belief Therapy, and (8) Skills for Living - a social skills manual. Conclusions In addition to the original aims of manualization, this exercise has clarified the treatment programme, included less highly trained staff in the delivery of therapy and permitted the evaluation of treatment modules, thus contributing to the incremental evaluation of the overall programme. These manuals may usefully be shared with other practitioners in the field. Copyright 2005 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


Therapists' adherence and competence and treatment discrimination in the NIDA Collaborative Cocaine Treatment Study

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2004
Jacques P. Barber
The National Institute on Drug Abuse Collaborative Cocaine Treatment Study was designed to assess the efficacy of four different psychosocial interventions (cognitive therapy, supportive,expressive dynamic therapy, and individual and group drug counseling) for cocaine dependence. This report addresses the treatment integrity and discriminability of the three individual treatments. Therapists' adherence and competence for all three individual treatments during early and late sessions were rated reliably by three sets of independent expert judges (one set of expert clinicians for each treatment condition). Results indicated that therapists and counselors made use of the therapeutic techniques described in their respective treatment manuals rather than those from different treatment manuals. Thus, treatments were easily discriminable by the independent judges. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol. [source]


A survey of influences on the practice of psychotherapists and clinical psychologists in training in the UK

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THEORY & PRACTICE), Issue 2 2006
Mike P. Lucock
A questionnaire survey of 95 qualified psychotherapists of various therapeutic orientations and 69 psychologists in clinical training was carried out to investigate the main influences on their clinical practice, using the Questionnaire of Influencing Factors on Clinical Practice in Psychotherapies (QuIF-CliPP). For the qualified group the most highly rated factors were current supervision, client characteristics, client feedback, psychological formulation, intuition/judgement, professional training and post-qualification training. For the trainees, those rated highest were current supervision, past supervision, client characteristics, client feedback, psychological formulation and professional training. Evidence based factors such as treatment manuals and evidence based guidelines were rated relatively low for both groups, although the cognitive behaviour therapists rated them significantly higher than the other groups. Personal therapy was rated highly by the psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, person centred and eclectic therapists but not by CB therapists. The implications of these findings for the application of evidence based practice and the need to evaluated supervision, personal therapy and training are discussed.,Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Is It Time for Clinicians to Routinely Track Patient Outcome?

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 3 2003
A Meta-Analysis
Empirically supported psychotherapies, treatment guidelines, best practices, and treatment manuals are methods proposed to enhance treatment outcomes in routine practice. Patient-focused research systems provide a compatible and contrasting methodology. Such systems monitor and feed back information about a patient's progress during psychotherapy for the purpose of enhancing outcomes. A meta-analytic review of three large-scale studies is summarized and suggests that formally monitoring patient progress has a significant impact on clients who show a poor initial response to treatment. Implementation of this feedback system reduced deterioration by 4% to 8% and increased positive outcomes. Our interpretation of these results suggests that it may be time for clinicians routinely and formally to monitor patient treatment response. [source]