Treatment Integrity (treatment + integrity)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Definitional and Practical Issues in the Assessment of Treatment Integrity

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2005
Keith S. Dobson
Perepletchikova and Kazdin discuss the issue of establishing treatment integrity in the context of treatment outcome research. They offer important insights into the potential explanations for the conflicting results and suggest directions for future assessment and research designs. This commentary, in the context of Perepletchikova and Kazdin's paper, discusses (a) issues related to the definition and assessment of treatment integrity and its components and (b) the scientific, practical, and clinical applications of assessing treatment integrity. [source]


Treatment Integrity: Implications for Training

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2005
Ellen Flannery-Schroeder
Perepletchikova and Kazdin (this issue) reviewed the extant literature on the relationship between treatment integrity and therapy outcomes. The empirical literature on this relationship is inconsistent, and the authors note existing limitations in current research strategies and provide recommendations for future research efforts. This commentary explores the implications that a focus on treatment integrity has for training. As such, comments are offered on a number of conceptual, methodological, and practical issues relating to treatment integrity, instruction in empirically supported treatments, competence, and the training of future clinical psychologists. [source]


The manualization of a treatment programme for personality disorder

CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 1 2005
Mary McMurran
Background The advantages of manualized psychological treatments include: the promotion of evidence-based practice, the enhancement of treatment integrity, the facilitation of staff training, and the potential replicability of treatment. Argument The manualization of a multi-component, multidisciplinary treatment programme for male personality-disordered offenders is described. The background to this development is explained and the treatment setting is described briefly, followed by a description of the eight treatment manuals: (1) the treatment overview, (2) Psychoeducation focusing on personality disorder diagnosis and core beliefs, (3) Trust and Self-awareness group exercises, (4) Stop & Think! - a social problem-solving intervention, (5) Controlling Angry Aggression, (6) Controlling Substance Use, (7) Criminal Thinking/Belief Therapy, and (8) Skills for Living - a social skills manual. Conclusions In addition to the original aims of manualization, this exercise has clarified the treatment programme, included less highly trained staff in the delivery of therapy and permitted the evaluation of treatment modules, thus contributing to the incremental evaluation of the overall programme. These manuals may usefully be shared with other practitioners in the field. Copyright 2005 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


DOES CORRECTIONAL PROGRAM QUALITY REALLY MATTER?

CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 3 2006
THE IMPACT OF ADHERING TO THE PRINCIPLES OF EFFECTIVE INTERVENTION
Research Summary: This study analyzed data on 3,237 offenders placed in 1 of 38 community-based residential programs as part of their parole or other post-release control. Offenders terminated from these programs were matched to, and compared with, a group of offenders (N = 3,237) under parole or other post-release control who were not placed in residential programming. Data on program characteristics and treatment integrity were obtained through staff surveys and interviews with program directors. This information on program characteristics was then related to the treatment effects associated with each program. Policy Implications: Significant and substantial relationships between program characteristics and program effectiveness were noted. This research provides information that is relevant to the development of correctional programs, and it can be used by funding agencies when awarding contracts for services. [source]


Therapists' adherence and competence and treatment discrimination in the NIDA Collaborative Cocaine Treatment Study

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2004
Jacques P. Barber
The National Institute on Drug Abuse Collaborative Cocaine Treatment Study was designed to assess the efficacy of four different psychosocial interventions (cognitive therapy, supportive,expressive dynamic therapy, and individual and group drug counseling) for cocaine dependence. This report addresses the treatment integrity and discriminability of the three individual treatments. Therapists' adherence and competence for all three individual treatments during early and late sessions were rated reliably by three sets of independent expert judges (one set of expert clinicians for each treatment condition). Results indicated that therapists and counselors made use of the therapeutic techniques described in their respective treatment manuals rather than those from different treatment manuals. Thus, treatments were easily discriminable by the independent judges. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol. [source]


A survey investigating school psychologists' measurement of treatment integrity in school-based interventions and their beliefs about its importance

PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 6 2008
Wendy S. Cochrane
A survey of individuals holding the Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) credential was conducted via the Internet to gather information regarding their measurement of treatment integrity in school-based interventions and their beliefs about its importance. A sample of 806 self-selected professionals holding the NCSP credential provided data about the extent to which they measure treatment integrity and the methods they used to measure it when developing interventions via one-to-one and group/team consultation. Results showed that 97.6% agreed that measurement of treatment integrity was a key factor to consider and to include when evaluating interventions and when using intervention data for special education eligibility decisions. Few, however, reported regularly documenting it in one-to-one (only 11.3%) or group/team consultation (only 1.9%). Recommendations for how school psychologists and other school staff can increase their measurement of treatment integrity in school-based interventions are offered. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Promoting parent use of empirically supported reading interventions: two experimental investigations of child outcomes

BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS, Issue 1 2006
Michael Persampieri
Two experimental investigations of the effects of parent delivered reading interventions were conducted. Tutoring packages consisting of empirically supported intervention components were delivered by parents for at least several weeks after initial parent training. Both experiments used single-case experimental designs and measured participants' oral reading fluency in passages. Experiment 1 used a multiple-probe design across tasks (passages) to evaluate tutoring effects for two students with learning disabilities. Results indicate that both students increased their reading fluency and maintained those increases over time. Experiment 2 used a brief experimental analysis that included both experimenter and parent delivered instructional trials to validate the treatment package. Next, the treatment package was evaluated using an alternating treatments design. Results were uniformly positive. An interesting but not surprising correlation was also found between treatment integrity and student outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of the framework and skills that behavior analysts have for working with parents and schools to improve their children's academic responding. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Definitional and Practical Issues in the Assessment of Treatment Integrity

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2005
Keith S. Dobson
Perepletchikova and Kazdin discuss the issue of establishing treatment integrity in the context of treatment outcome research. They offer important insights into the potential explanations for the conflicting results and suggest directions for future assessment and research designs. This commentary, in the context of Perepletchikova and Kazdin's paper, discusses (a) issues related to the definition and assessment of treatment integrity and its components and (b) the scientific, practical, and clinical applications of assessing treatment integrity. [source]


Treatment Integrity: Implications for Training

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2005
Ellen Flannery-Schroeder
Perepletchikova and Kazdin (this issue) reviewed the extant literature on the relationship between treatment integrity and therapy outcomes. The empirical literature on this relationship is inconsistent, and the authors note existing limitations in current research strategies and provide recommendations for future research efforts. This commentary explores the implications that a focus on treatment integrity has for training. As such, comments are offered on a number of conceptual, methodological, and practical issues relating to treatment integrity, instruction in empirically supported treatments, competence, and the training of future clinical psychologists. [source]