Behaviour Scale (behaviour + scale)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Behaviour Scale

  • adaptive behaviour scale
  • vineland adaptive behaviour scale


  • Selected Abstracts


    The developmental change in strategies parents employ to settle young children to sleep, and their relationship to infant sleeping problems, as assessed by a new questionnaire: the Parental Interactive Bedtime Behaviour Scale

    INFANT AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 1 2002
    Julian Morrell
    Abstract The development of a new parental self-report questionnaire, the Parental Interactive Bedtime Behaviour Scale (PIBBS) is described. The PIBBS was designed to capture a wide range of parental behaviours used to settle infants off to sleep. The commonest behaviours employed were giving a feed, talking softly to the child, cuddling in the arms, and stroking. A factor analysis revealed five settling strategies; ,active physical comforting' (e.g. cuddling in arms); ,encouraging infant autonomy' (e.g. leaving to cry); ,movement' (e.g. car rides), ,passive physical comforting' (e.g. standing next to the cot without picking the infant up), and ,social comforting' (e.g. reading a story). Excessive ,active physical comforting' and reduced ,encourage autonomy' strategy use was associated with infant sleeping problems. Regarding developmental change in strategy between 1 and 2 years, the later the onset at which ,encourage autonomy' became the principal strategy used, the more likely that persistent infant sleeping problems would be present. Factors accounting for the change in strategy use over time were: (i) parental adaptation to infant developmental maturation; (ii) the interaction between maternal cognition and strategy, and, to a lesser extent; (iii) the interaction between infant temperament and parental strategy. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Parenting stress in mothers of adults with an intellectual disability: parental cognitions in relation to child characteristics and family support

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 12 2009
    C. Hill
    Abstract Background There is a body of evidence that indicates that the cognitions of parents of children with intellectual disabilities (ID) play an important role in influencing parental stress. However, there is a paucity of evidence about the experience of parents of adult children with ID. This study sought to apply a model of parenting stress to mothers of adults with ID. Of particular interest were the parental cognitions of parenting self-esteem and parental locus of control. Method Face-to face interviews were administered with 44 mothers of adults with ID. They completed the Vineland Adaptive and Maladaptive Behaviour Scale, the Family Support Scale, the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale, a shortened version of the Parental Locus of Control Scale and the Parenting Stress Index. Results Correlations were observed between parenting stress and the other study variables. Regression analysis revealed that parental cognitive variables predicted 61% of the variance in parenting stress. Parenting satisfaction, a subscale of the measure of parenting sense of competence, mediated the relationships between adaptive behaviour and parenting stress and between family support and parenting stress. Conclusions These results indicate the importance of cognitive variables in the stress of mothers of adults with ID. Potential avenues of future research might focus on the experience of fathers and the impact of positive perceptions as a cognitive factor. [source]


    Mothers' expressed emotion towards children with and without intellectual disabilities

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 7 2004
    A. Beck
    Objectives To identify factors associated with maternal expressed emotion (EE) towards their child with intellectual disability (ID). Design and method A total of 33 mothers who had a child with ID and at least one child without disabilities between the ages of 4 and 14 years participated in the study. Mothers completed self-assessment questionnaires which addressed their sense of parenting competence, beliefs about child-rearing practices, and their reports of behavioural and emotional problems of their child with ID. Telephone interviews were conducted to assess maternal EE towards the child with ID and towards a sibling using the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS; Magana et al. 1986), and also to assess the adaptive behaviour of the child with ID using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scale (VABS; Sparrow et al. 1984). Results Mothers with high EE towards their child with ID were more satisfied with their parenting ability, and their children had more behaviour problems. Analysis of differential maternal parenting, through comparisons of EE towards their two children, showed that mothers were more negative towards their child with ID for all domains of the FMSS except dissatisfaction. Conclusions A small number of factors associated with maternal EE towards children with ID were identified. Differences in maternal EE towards their child with ID and their other child suggest that EE is child-driven rather than a general maternal characteristic. Implications of the data for future research are discussed. [source]


    Responsiveness to staff support: evaluating the impact of individual characteristics on the effectiveness of active support training using a conditional probability approach

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 8 2002
    C. Smith
    Abstract Background Active support training was fully conducted in 38 community houses accommodating 106 adults with intellectual disabilities (ID; group 1), but not in a further 36 accommodating 82 adults with ID (group 2). The aims of the present study were to analyse whether staff became more effective in supporting resident activity after the implementation of active support, and whether there was evidence of differential responsiveness by people with differing status in relation to adaptive behaviour, psychiatric diagnosis, challenging behaviour or autism. Methods Observations of staff:resident interaction and resident engagement in activity were taken before and after active support training. Changes in Yule's Q statistics, indicating the likelihood that resident engagement in activity followed staff giving residents verbal instruction or non-verbal assistance, were compared for the two groups. In addition, changes in similar statistics were compared for residents within group 1: (1) with Adaptive Behaviour Scale (ABS) scores above and below 180; and (2) with and without severe challenging behaviour, the triad of social impairments and mental illness. Results Yule's Q for engagement given non-verbal assistance significantly increased post-training among group 1, but not among group 2. Similar significant increases were found among group 1 residents with ABS scores below 180 without challenging behaviour, with and without the triad of social impairments, and without mental illness, but not with an ABS score above 180, with challenging behaviour and with mental illness. Conclusion The present analysis reinforces previous studies on the effectiveness of active support training for adults with more severe ID (i.e. with ABS scores below 180). Active support was as effective for people with the triad of social impairments as for those without it. However, the effectiveness of support offered to people with challenging behaviour or mental illness did not significantly increase. [source]


    The role of impulsivity in actual and problematic use of the mobile phone

    APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 9 2008
    JoŽl Billieux
    Several authors have investigated the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. debts incurred by young people). The aims of the present study are (1) to validate a new questionnaire assessing problematic mobile phone use: the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire (PMPUQ), and (2) to investigate the relationships between the PMPUQ and the multi-faceted construct of impulsivity. With these aims, 339 subjects were screened using the PMPUQ and the UPPS Impulsive Behaviour Scale (UPPS) which assesses four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviours (urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance and sensation seeking). The results showed that the PMPUQ has an acceptable fit and assesses four different dimensions of problematic mobile phone use (prohibited use, dangerous use, dependence, financial problems). While each facet of impulsivity played a specific role in mobile phones use, urgency appeared to be the strongest predictor of problematic use. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Are the cognitive functions of children with Down syndrome related to their participation?

    DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 1 2010
    TANYA RIHTMAN
    Aim, There is a lack of investigation into the functional developmental profile of children with Down syndrome. On the basis of current international health paradigms, the purpose of this study was to assess the developmental profile of these children. Method, Sixty children (33 males, 27 females) with Down syndrome (age range 6,16y; mean age 9y 3mo, SD 28.8mo), who had received standard, holistic, early intervention, were assessed. Of these, 42 (70%) had congenital anomalies, 12 had severe congenital heart defects. Participants were assessed on measures of cognitive function (Beery,Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual,Motor Integration; Stanford,Binet Intelligence Scale) and participation (Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales). Results, No difference was found on any measure on the basis of severity of congenital anomaly. Results showed improvements in age-related body function and correlations between specific body functions and participation. No decline in IQ was found with age, and significant correlations between IQ and all other measures were noted. Although sex differences were found in the body functions of short-term memory and motor function, no difference in measures of activity performance and participation was found. Interpretation, Our findings emphasize the need for paediatric Down syndrome intervention to encourage improved body functions while emphasizing the acquisition of functional skills that enable enhanced participation in age-appropriate activities. [source]


    Handicaps and the development of skills between childhood and early adolescence in young people with severe intellectual disabilities

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 12 2005
    O. Chadwick
    Abstract Background While a number of studies have examined the development of skills in children with intellectual disabilities (ID), most have been cross-sectional, most have been concerned with particular syndromes such as Down's syndrome or autism and few have attempted to identify factors associated with improvements in skills. Methods From a sample of 111 children with severe ID who had been identified from the registers of six special schools at 4,11 years of age, 82 were traced and reassessed 5 years later at the age of 11,17 years. On both occasions, information on the children's handicaps and skills was collected by interviewing their main carers using a shortened version of the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales and the Disability Assessment Schedule. Results and conclusions There were small but statistically significant improvements in Vineland age-equivalent communication and daily living skills scores, but not in Vineland Socialization scores, over the 5-year period of follow-up. This pattern of improvement was observed in most aetiological subgroups. Improvement in skills was greatest in younger children, and was associated with reductions in behaviour problems and in levels of parental stress. In spite of the improvements in age-equivalent scores, Vineland standard scores showed significant declines over the same period of time, indicating that the improvements observed were smaller than would be expected in a general population sample of children of the same age. The dangers of using standard scores or quotients to quantify the level of functioning of children with severe ID are highlighted. [source]


    Social skills in children with intellectual disabilities with and without autism

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 5 2005
    A. De Bildt
    Abstract Background Social skills were studied in 363 children with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) and 147 with moderate ID with and without autism (age 4 through 18). The objective was to investigate the value of the Children's Social Behaviour Questionnaire (CSBQ), as a measure of subtle social skills, added to a measure of basic social skills with the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS), in identifying children with ID with or without autism. Method Children with mild and moderate ID, with and without autistic symptomatology were compared on basic social skills, measured with the Communication and Socialization domains of the VABS, and subtle social skills, measured with the CSBQ. Results Measuring basic social skills is not sufficient in differentiating between levels of ID. Communicative skills and subtle social skills, that concern overlooking activities or situations and fear of changes in the existing situation, seem to play a far greater role. Additionally, with respect to identifying autistic symptomatology, basic social skills do not contribute, as opposed to communicative skills and the tendency to withdraw from others. Conclusions The results implicate that the CSBQ not only has specific value as a measure of subtle social skills to identify pervasive developmental disorders, but that the instrument also has a specific contribution to differentiating between the two levels of ID. Furthermore, our outcomes imply a slight difference between limitations in subtle social skills as mentioned by the AAMR (American Association on Mental Retardation 2002) and limitations in subtle social skills as seen in milder forms of pervasive developmental disorders. Clinical and theoretical implications will be discussed. [source]


    Factors affecting the risk of behaviour problems in children with severe intellectual disability

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 2 2000
    O. Chadwick
    In order to examine the importance of a range of potential risk factors for behaviour problems in children with severe intellectual disability, a sample was identified by the administration of a screening version of the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) to the parents of children aged 4,11years attending six special needs schools in three adjacent inner London boroughs. Parents whose children had a VABS standard score of 50 were interviewed using the Disability Assessment Schedule and both parents and teachers completed the Aberrant Behaviour Checklist. Most behaviour problems were more common in ambulant children, but problems less dependent on the ability to walk, such as sleeping difficulties, screaming and self-injury, were equally common in ambulant and non-ambulant children. Among ambulant children, there were few significant associations between the severity of the child's behaviour problems and the age or sex of the child, the presence or absence of epilepsy, and various indices of socio-economic disadvantage. Sleeping difficulties, overactivity, self-injury, destructive behaviour and autistic features, such as social withdrawal and stereotypies, were strongly associated with skills deficits, but aggression, temper tantrums and general disruptive behaviour were not. Limitations in daily living skills were better predictors of behaviour problems than were poor communication skills. [source]


    Validation of the UPPS impulsive behaviour scale: a four-factor model of impulsivity

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 7 2005
    Stephen P. Whiteside
    The current study attempts to clarify the multi-faceted nature of impulsivity through the use of the four-factor UPPS Impulsive Behaviour scale. In order to build the nomological network surrounding this scale, the UPPS was administered to individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), pathological gamblers (PG), alcohol abusers (divided into two groups based on the presence of antisocial features), and a control group. Several of the UPPS scales (e.g. Urgency, lack of Premeditation, and Sensation Seeking) differentiated the BPD, PG, and alcohol abusers with antisocial features from a group of non-antisocial alcohol abusers and a control group. Overall, the UPPS scales accounted for between 7% (pathological gambling) and 64% (borderline personality disorder features) of the overall variance in the psychopathology measures. Individual UPPS scales also made unique contributions to several of these disorders, which may provide insight into which of these personality traits may predispose individuals to behave in maladaptive or problematic ways. The results provide support for the differentiation of impulsivity-related constructs into the current four-factor model. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 7 2010
    Ya-Chu Hsiao
    hsiao y.-c., chien l.-y., wu l.-y., chiang c.-m. & huang s.-y. (2010) Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Journal of Advanced Nursing,66(7), 1612,1622. Abstract Title.,Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Aim., This paper is a report of an exploration of the association of spiritual health with clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Background., Several studies in western countries have demonstrated an association between spirituality and health. Spirituality-related research in eastern countries, however, is still in its infancy. Methods., A cross-sectional design was adopted and structured questionnaires were used for data collection. We adopted the Probability Proportional to Size cluster sampling method to recruit nursing students in senior grades. Data were collected in 2005 using the Spiritual Health Scale, Perceived Clinical Practice Stress Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II and Health Promotion Behaviours Scale. Results., A total of 1276 nursing students with an average age of 20∑1 years (sd = 1∑6 years) participated in the study. Spiritual health was negatively associated with clinical practice stress (r = ,0∑211, P < 0∑001) and depressive tendency (r = ,0∑324, P < 0∑001) and positively associated with health-promoting behaviours (r = 0∑611, P < 0∑001). Using hierarchical regression analysis to control for demographic factors, spiritual health was found to be an important predictive factor for clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours. Conclusion., These results are consistent with research findings from western countries. Educators should develop strategies to address nursing students' spiritual health. This may help nursing students to manage their stress, to reduce depressive symptoms and to enhance health-promoting behaviours. [source]


    Eating problems at age 6 years in a whole population sample of extremely preterm children

    DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 2 2010
    MUTHANNA SAMARA
    Aim, The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of eating problems and their association with neurological and behavioural disabilities and growth among children born extremely preterm (EPC) at age 6 years. Method, A standard questionnaire about eating was completed by parents of 223 children (125 males [56.1%], 98 females [43.9%]) aged 6 years who were born at 25 weeks' gestation or earlier (mean 24.5wks, SD 0.7wks; mean birthweight 749.1g, SD 116.8g), and parents of 148 classmates born at term (66 males [44.6%], 82 females [55.4%]). All children underwent neurological, cognitive, and anthropometric assessment, and parents and teachers completed a behaviour scale. Results, Eating problems were more common among the EPC than the comparison group (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1,6.3), including oral motor (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.8,9.9), hypersensitivity (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.6,5.6), and behavioural (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.9,7.6) problems. Group differences were reduced after adjustment for cognitive impairment, neuromotor disability, and other behaviour problems. EPC with eating problems were shorter, lighter, and had lower mid-arm circumference and lower body mass index (BMI) even after adjusting for disabilities, gestational age, birthweight, and feeding problems at 30 months. Interpretation, Eating problems are still frequent in EPC at school age. They are only partly related to other disabilities but make an additional contribution to continued growth failure and may require early recognition and intervention. [source]


    Validation of the UPPS impulsive behaviour scale: a four-factor model of impulsivity

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 7 2005
    Stephen P. Whiteside
    The current study attempts to clarify the multi-faceted nature of impulsivity through the use of the four-factor UPPS Impulsive Behaviour scale. In order to build the nomological network surrounding this scale, the UPPS was administered to individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), pathological gamblers (PG), alcohol abusers (divided into two groups based on the presence of antisocial features), and a control group. Several of the UPPS scales (e.g. Urgency, lack of Premeditation, and Sensation Seeking) differentiated the BPD, PG, and alcohol abusers with antisocial features from a group of non-antisocial alcohol abusers and a control group. Overall, the UPPS scales accounted for between 7% (pathological gambling) and 64% (borderline personality disorder features) of the overall variance in the psychopathology measures. Individual UPPS scales also made unique contributions to several of these disorders, which may provide insight into which of these personality traits may predispose individuals to behave in maladaptive or problematic ways. The results provide support for the differentiation of impulsivity-related constructs into the current four-factor model. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Mental Health and Social Care Needs of Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, Issue 3 2005
    Andre Strydom
    Background, Older people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are a growing population but their age-related needs are rarely considered and community services are still geared towards the younger age group. We aimed to examine the mental health and social care needs of this new service user group. Methods, We identified all adults with ID without Down syndrome (DS) aged 65+ living in the London boroughs of Camden and Islington. The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with a Developmental Disability (PASADD) checklist was used to detect psychiatric disorder, the Vineland behaviour scale (maladaptive domain) for problem behaviours and the Dementia Questionnaire for persons with Mental Retardation (DMR) to screen for dementia. Carers reported health problems and disability. Needs were measured with the Camberwell Assessment of Need for adults with Intellectual Disabilities (CANDID-S). Results, A total of 23 older people with ID (13 had mild ID and nine more severe ID) and their carers participated in the survey. In which, 74% had one or more psychiatric symptoms; 30% were previously known with a diagnosis of mental illness. One-third of the older people screened positive for dementia (range: 17,44%, depending on sensitivity of DMR scores used). Three quarters of the group had physical health problems, 74% had poor sight, 22% had hearing loss and 30% had mobility problems. Carers rated unmet needs for accommodation (22%), day activities, and eyesight and hearing. The people with ID rated unmet needs to be social relationships (44%), information and physical health. Conclusion, Older people with ID without DS have considerable prevalence of health problems and psychiatric disorders, including symptoms of functional decline and dementia. Such symptoms are often not recognised and further research into their needs is a priority. [source]


    The impact of behaviour problems on caregiver stress in young people with autism spectrum disorders

    JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 3 2006
    L. Lecavalier
    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the correlates of caregiver stress in a large sample of young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Two main objectives were to: (1) disentangle the effects of behaviour problems and level of functioning on caregiver stress; and (2) measure the stability of behaviour problems and caregiver stress. Methods Parents or teachers of 293 young people with ASDs completed measures of stress, behaviour problems and social competence. Parents also completed an adaptive behaviour scale. Eighty-one young people were rated twice at a 1-year interval. Results Parents and teachers did not perfectly agree on the nature and severity of behaviour problems. However, both sets of ratings indicated that behaviour problems were strongly associated with stress. Conduct problems in particular were significant predictors of stress. Adaptive skills were not significantly associated with caregiver stress. Parental reports of behaviour problems and stress were quite stable over the 1-year interval, much more so than teacher reports. Parent ratings suggested that behaviour problems and stress exacerbated each other over time. This transactional model did not fit the teacher data. Conclusion Results of this study suggested that it is a specific group of externalized behaviours that are the most strongly associated with both parent and teacher stress. Results were discussed from methodological and conceptual perspectives. [source]


    Early motherhood and disruptive behaviour in the school-age child

    ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 1 2004
    P Trautmann-Villalba
    Aim: To determine the significance of young maternal age, family adversity and maternal behaviour during mother-toddler interaction in the prediction of child disruptive behaviour at age eight. Methods: From an ongoing longitudinal study of infants at risk for later psychopathology (n= 362), 72 young mothers aged between 15 and 24 y (median 22 y) at first birth were compared with 197 primiparous older mothers ranging in age from 25 to 41 y (median 29 y). Family adversity at childbirth was assessed using a modified version of Rutter's Family Adversity Index (FAI) and measures of child disruptive behaviour at age eight were obtained using Achenbach's Teacher Report Form (TRF). An observational procedure was used to assess maternal behaviour during mother-child interaction at the age of 2 y. Results: Young mothers encountered more adverse family characteristics and were more inadequate, restrictive and more negative during interaction with their toddlers. Their school-aged children showed higher scores on all disruptive behaviour scales of the TRF. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that family adversity and maternal behaviour during toddler interaction could account for most of the association between early motherhood and child disruptive behaviour. Conclusion: The impact of young motherhood on child mental health is not confined to teenage mothers and is mainly attributed to psychosocial and interactional factors. [source]