Training Level (training + level)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Redefining Emergency Medicine Procedures: Canadian Competence and Frequency Survey

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 7 2001
FRCPC, Ken Farion MD
Objective: To redefine the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (RCPS) procedural skills list for Canadian emergency medicine (EM) residents through a national survey of EM specialists to determine procedural performance frequency and self-assessment of competence. Methods: The survey instrument was developed in three phases: 1) an EM program directors survey identified inappropriate or dated procedures, endorsing 127 skills; 2) a search of EM literature added 98 skills; and 3) an expert panel designed the survey instrument and finalized a list of 150 skills. The survey instrument measured the frequency of procedure performance or supervision, self-reported competence (yes/no), and endorsement of one of four training levels for each skill: undergraduate (UG), postgraduate (PG), knowledge only, or un-necessary (i.e., too infrequently performed to maintain competence). Results: All 289 Canadian EM specialists were surveyed by mail; 231 (80%) responded, 221 completed surveys, and 10 were inactive. More than 60% reported competence in 125 (83%) procedures, and 55 procedures were performed at least three times a year. The mean competence score was 121 (SD 17.7, median = 122) procedures. Competence score correlation with patient volume was r= 0.16 (p = 0.02) and with hours worked was r= 0.19 (p = 0.01). Competence score was not associated with year or route (residency vs grandfather) of certification. Each procedure was assigned to a training level using response consensus and decision rules (UG: 1%; PG: 82%; unnecessary: 17%). Conclusions: A survey of EM clinicians reporting competence and frequency of skill performance defined 127 procedural skills appropriate for Canadian RCPS postgraduate training and EM certification. [source]


A comparison study of career satisfaction and emotional states between primary care and speciality residents

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 1 2006
Donald E Girard
Objective, To evaluate career satisfaction, emotional states and positive and negative experiences among residents in primary care and speciality programmes in 1 academic medical centre prior to the implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) duty hour requirements. Design, Cross-sectional survey. Measurements, All 581 residents in the academic health centre were asked to participate voluntarily in a confidential survey; 327(56%) completed the survey. Results, Compared to their primary care colleagues, speciality residents had higher levels of satisfaction with career choice, feelings of competence and excitement, lower levels of inferiority and fatigue and different perceptions of positive and negative training experiences. However, 77% of all respondents were consistently or generally pleased with their career choices. The most positive residents' experiences related to interpersonal relationships and their educational value; the most negative experiences related to interpersonal relationships and issues perceived to be outside of residents' control. Age and training level, but not gender also influenced career satisfaction, emotional states and positive and negative opinions about residency. Conclusions, Less satisfaction with career choice and more negative emotional states for primary care residents compared to speciality residents probably relate to the training experience and may influence medical students' selections of careers. The primary care residents, compared to speciality residents, appear to have difficulty in fulfilling their ideals of professionalism in an environment where they have no control. These data provide baseline information with which to compare these same factors after the implementation of the ACGME duty hours' and competency requirements. [source]


Evaluation of some factors affecting the agreement between the Proview Eye Pressure Monitor and the Goldmann applanation tonometer measurements

CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OPTOMETRY, Issue 4 2007
Pinakin Gunvant BS Optom PhD FAAO
Background:, Our aim was to examine whether training level and ocular factors could account for part of the difference in intraocular pressure (IOP) measured using the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) and Proview Eye Pressure Monitor (PPT). Methods:, One hundred and nineteen individuals (238 eyes) were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 35.8 years (range 21 to 79). All study participants obtained IOP measurements using the PPT after hearing instructions on how to perform PPT. Glaucoma patients obtained additional IOP measurements using PPT after viewing an instructional video and after 30 days of home use. IOP was also measured using the GAT at each experimental session. Results:, The difference in IOP measured by the GAT and the PPT was 0.55 3.38 mmHg, 0.17 3.79 mmHg and -1.30 3.79 mmHg for myopic, emmetropic and hypermetropic groups, respectively, which were statistically significant (ANCOVA; p = 0.014). The difference in IOP between GAT and PPT was not significantly different for measurements obtained after verbal instructions, instructional video or after 30 days of home use (Repeated-ANCOVA; p = 0.30). The overall agreement between the GAT and the PPT was poor. Intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.575, and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of agreement was -6.93 to +6.73 mmHg. Conclusion:, There was a small systematic difference in IOP measured by the GAT and PPT when comparing the different refraction groups; however, this level of difference between the groups is unlikely to be of clinical significance. The level of training in using the PPT did not influence its measurements. The limits of agreement between the PPT and the GAT were wide and long-term use of PPT did not improve its agreement. [source]


Redefining Emergency Medicine Procedures: Canadian Competence and Frequency Survey

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 7 2001
FRCPC, Ken Farion MD
Objective: To redefine the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (RCPS) procedural skills list for Canadian emergency medicine (EM) residents through a national survey of EM specialists to determine procedural performance frequency and self-assessment of competence. Methods: The survey instrument was developed in three phases: 1) an EM program directors survey identified inappropriate or dated procedures, endorsing 127 skills; 2) a search of EM literature added 98 skills; and 3) an expert panel designed the survey instrument and finalized a list of 150 skills. The survey instrument measured the frequency of procedure performance or supervision, self-reported competence (yes/no), and endorsement of one of four training levels for each skill: undergraduate (UG), postgraduate (PG), knowledge only, or un-necessary (i.e., too infrequently performed to maintain competence). Results: All 289 Canadian EM specialists were surveyed by mail; 231 (80%) responded, 221 completed surveys, and 10 were inactive. More than 60% reported competence in 125 (83%) procedures, and 55 procedures were performed at least three times a year. The mean competence score was 121 (SD 17.7, median = 122) procedures. Competence score correlation with patient volume was r= 0.16 (p = 0.02) and with hours worked was r= 0.19 (p = 0.01). Competence score was not associated with year or route (residency vs grandfather) of certification. Each procedure was assigned to a training level using response consensus and decision rules (UG: 1%; PG: 82%; unnecessary: 17%). Conclusions: A survey of EM clinicians reporting competence and frequency of skill performance defined 127 procedural skills appropriate for Canadian RCPS postgraduate training and EM certification. [source]


Some Preparation Required: The Journey To Successful Studio Collaboration

JOURNAL OF INTERIOR DESIGN, Issue 2 2006
Jennifer D. Webb Ph.D.
ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between team training perceptions and training effectiveness among students and faculty. The three objectives for this project were: 1) compare student and faculty perceptions concerning the provision of team training in design studios; 2) investigate the relationship between students' reported team training levels and students' reported team attitudes; and 3) investigate the relationship between students' reported team training levels and students' reported team behaviors. IDEC members and their interior design students were selected to participate in the study. Questionnaires were mailed to the faculty and the instruments were administered in a manner similar to course evaluations. Chi Square analysis suggests that instructors were more likely than students to indicate that they had provided training on effective communication, task division, conflict resolution, and characteristics of a good team. The findings suggest that teamwork training is positively related to positive perceptions and attitudes about teamwork, and to proactive behaviors in team settings. Most importantly, findings indicate that participation in multiple team projects is not related to improved attitudes or behaviors. This result emphasizes the role of preparation in successful studio collaboration. [source]


Ethics in Neuroscience Graduate Training Programs: Views and Models from Canada

MIND, BRAIN, AND EDUCATION, Issue 1 2010
Sofia Lombera
Consideration of the ethical, social, and policy implications of research has become increasingly important to scientists and scholars whose work focuses on brain and mind, but limited empirical data exist on the education in ethics available to them. We examined the current landscape of ethics training in neuroscience programs, beginning with the Canadian context specifically, to elucidate the perceived needs of mentors and trainees and offer recommendations for resource development to meet those needs. We surveyed neuroscientists at all training levels and interviewed directors of neuroscience programs and training grants. A total of 88% of survey respondents reported general interest in ethics, and 96% indicated a desire for more ethics content as it applies to brain research and clinical translation. Expert interviews revealed formal ethics education in over half of programs and in 90% of grants-based programs. Lack of time, resources, and expertise, however, are major barriers to expanding ethics content in neuroscience education. We conclude with an initial set of recommendations to address these barriers which includes the development of flexible, tailored ethics education tools, increased financial support for ethics training, and strategies for fostering collaboration between ethics experts, neuroscience program directors, and funding agencies. [source]