Therapy Theory (therapy + theory)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Couple and Family Therapy Theory and Practice: Innovations in 2010,

FAMILY PROCESS, Issue 3 2010
EVAN IMBER-BLACK
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Application of family therapy theory to complex social issues: using the WebQuest in family therapy training

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 4 2007
Soh-Leong Lim
This paper describes how the WebQuest is used to foster critical thinking and application of theory to complex social problems in a Master's level class on contemporary family therapy theories. The issue of child trafficking and prostitution is explored through the web-based inquiry learning where scaffold learning is provided. Scaffolding includes resource links and guidance on cognitive and social skills, which are provided to facilitate the learner's development. The WebQuest design includes the task, the process and the evaluation rubrics. Student feedback on the WebQuest was positive and included increased motivation in learning, critical thinking and global awareness. [source]


Feelings in context: Countertransference and the real world in feminist therapy

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2001
Laura S. Brown
The concept of countertransference has been seen as problematic by feminist therapists. However, feminist therapy theory is intensely interested in the symbolic levels of the relationships between therapists and clients, with an emphasis on how the here and now social context informs and transforms those symbols. This article describes a feminist perspective on the therapist's symbolic relationships to clients, and the positive and challenging ramifications of those symbolic encounters. 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session 57: 1005,1012, 2001. [source]


Application of family therapy theory to complex social issues: using the WebQuest in family therapy training

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 4 2007
Soh-Leong Lim
This paper describes how the WebQuest is used to foster critical thinking and application of theory to complex social problems in a Master's level class on contemporary family therapy theories. The issue of child trafficking and prostitution is explored through the web-based inquiry learning where scaffold learning is provided. Scaffolding includes resource links and guidance on cognitive and social skills, which are provided to facilitate the learner's development. The WebQuest design includes the task, the process and the evaluation rubrics. Student feedback on the WebQuest was positive and included increased motivation in learning, critical thinking and global awareness. [source]


New-immigrant women in urban Canada: insights into occupation and sociocultural context

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INTERNATIONAL, Issue 4 2007
Vanessa Martins
Abstract Recent statistics have shown that women from South Asia comprise one of the largest sub-groups of immigrants to enter Canada. The majority of this population has settled in the city of Toronto. As immigrants adapt to new physical, social, political, and economic environments in a new country, they are also subject to changes in occupational roles and expectations. Little research has been conducted with new immigrant women from South Asia from an occupational adjustment perspective in Canada. This qualitative study sought to understand the adjustment experiences of immigrant women from South Asia regarding the influence of a Canadian urban environment on their occupations. Twelve recently immigrated women from South Asia to Canada were interviewed about their experiences of living in the city of Toronto with respect to their adjustment to a new environment and engagement in new daily occupations. Using a modified grounded theory approach to analysis, results from the study revealed many challenges these women face and the major factors that aid in the adjustment process. A framework for understanding occupational adjustment in new immigrants is discussed with implications for occupational therapy theory and practice. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Facilitating professional identity in occupational therapy students

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INTERNATIONAL, Issue 3 2003
Moses N. Ikiugu PhD, OTR/L Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy
Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore how a graduate course in occupational therapy theory can help prepare students to develop a professional identity. Thirty students participated in the study. The course included content on the history of occupational therapy, models of practice and the social, philosophical, political and economic factors that impact on occupational therapy. The students were divided into groups of four or five where they discussed issues assigned by the instructor. An electronic blackboard was used to share the discussion with the class. Surveys of the students' opinions were used to collect data on what the students viewed as the strengths and weaknesses of the course. The students felt that the class discussions were the strongest part of the course. They felt that the course improved their critical thinking and problem solving significantly. It was concluded from the results that the course facilitated their professional identity through the connection made between theory and practice. There is a recognized need to explore the issue of developing a professional identity in occupational therapy students through courses integrating philosophical topics and clinical practice. Specifically, it is recommended that further research be carried out in educational settings with larger samples, using comparison groups and other methodologies to evaluate the issue of facilitating professional identity in occupational therapy students. Copyright 2003 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


Time use, tempo and temporality: Occupational therapy's core business or someone else's business

AUSTRALIAN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL, Issue 3 2003
Louise Farnworth
A primary assumption underlying occupational therapy intervention is that peoples' use of time, or their participation in activities, is related to their overall well-being and quality of life. However, the translation of this assumption into occupational therapy practice often is not only invisible, but it is becoming increasingly difficult to sustain in current health care practices. This paper outlines current research and literature related to relationships between peoples' time use, tempo and temporality, and their well-being, and will discuss implications for occupational therapy theory, practice and research. [source]


Contemporary Brief Experiential Psychotherapy

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 1 2001
Robert Elliott
Contemporary experiential therapies are the focus of a revival involving new theory, practice, and research, all of which support their use as brief treatments. These humanistic therapies have evolved substantially since their origins in the 1950s and have emerged as an approach to working with clients that is process directive but not authoritarian, emotion focused yet systematic, and empowerment oriented while still research informed. In this article, I provide an overview of the main common elements of contemporary experiential therapy theory and practice, with special reference to its application as a brief therapy. I then review several types of meta-analytic outcome data, including randomized clinical trials, that support the effectiveness of brief, outpatient, individual experiential therapies. I conclude with a discussion of continuing developments. [source]