Therapy Research (therapy + research)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


LEAVING THE IVORY TOWER: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL SECTION ON DOING MARIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY RESEARCH IN COMMUNITY AGENCIES

JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2002
Eric E. McCollum
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


THE USE OF THEORY IN FAMILY THERAPY RESEARCH: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF FAMILY THERAPY JOURNALS

JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2000
Dale R. Hawley
Ninety-five studies from Family Process and Journal of Marital and Family Therapy were evaluated with regard to their use of theory. While a majority of the articles were judged to use theory in either an explicit or an implicit manner, 42% did not appear to draw on theory in either the introductory or discussion sections. Studies that used qualitative methods appeared to use theory more frequently and explicitly than those using quantitative methods alone. Systems theory was found to be the most common conceptual framework, followed by feminism. We conclude that the link between theory and reasearch in family therapy needs strengthening and suggest that the role of theory in family therapy be reexamined. [source]


Progression of Therapy Research and Clinical Application of Treatment Require Better Understanding of the Change Process

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 2 2001
Alan E. KazdinArticle first published online: 11 MAY 200
The stage model of therapy research focuses on the development of treatment from pilot work, through randomized controlled clinical trials, to tests in clinic settings. A goal of the model is to develop effective treatments that can be used clinically. The present comments begin with a similar goal but emphasize the importance of a broader agenda designed to understand therapy. A central thesis is that developing effective treatments depends heavily on investigations that address critical scientific questions; particularly, what are the mechanisms through which therapy operates and under what conditions is therapy likely to be effective and why? The comments argue for a portfolio of research that addresses a broader range of questions and encompasses more diverse methods of evaluating treatment. Breadth and diversity are not ends in themselves but will be essential to obtain the requisite knowledge to effect optimal changes in clinical applications of treatment. [source]


A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH IN FAMILY THERAPY JOURNALS

JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2000
Dale R. Hawley
In order to assess trends in family therapy research, empirical articles (N = 195) from three family therapy journals over a 5-year period were coded for several variables: authorship, external funding, methodology, sample, purpose, cost effectiveness, use of therapeutic model, and topic. Results indicated that a large pecentage of research in these journals focused on nonclinical issues and used nonclinical samples. Authors were affiliated with a wide variety of disciplines and reported low levels of external funding for their research. While a majority of the studies used quantitative methods, there appeared to be a growing number of studies using qualitative methods. Implications of these findings are discussed in light of research reviews over the past two decades. [source]


Conserved fate and function of ferumoxides-labeled neural precursor cells in vitro and in vivo

JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH, Issue 5 2010
Mikhal E. Cohen
Abstract Recent progress in cell therapy research for brain diseases has raised the need for non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells. For therapeutic application in multiple sclerosis, transplanted cells need to be tracked both spatially and temporally, in order to assess their migration and survival in the host tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of superparamagnetic iron oxide-(SPIO)-labeled cells has been widely used for high resolution monitoring of the biodistribution of cells after transplantation into the central nervous system (CNS). Here we labeled mouse glial-committed neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the clinically approved SPIO contrast agent ferumoxides and examined their survival and differentiation in vitro, as well as their functional response to environmental signals present within the inflamed brain of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice in vivo. We show that ferumoxides labeling does not affect NPC survival and pluripotency in vitro. Following intracerebroventricular (ICV) transplantation in EAE mice, ferumoxides-labeled NPCs responded to inflammatory cues in a similar fashion as unlabeled cells. Ferumoxides-labeled NPCs migrated over comparable distances in white matter tracts and differentiated equally into the glial lineages. Furthermore, ferumoxides-labeled NPCs inhibited lymph node cell proliferation in vitro, similarly to non-labeled cells, suggesting a preserved immunomodulatory function. These results demonstrate that ferumoxides-based MRI cell tracking is well suited for non-invasive monitoring of NPC transplantation. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


The State of Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Research

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 2 2002
Alan E. Kazdin
Child and adolescent therapy has progressed considerably, as reflected in the number of controlled studies, their methodological quality, and identification of evidence-based treatments. The progress is qualified by several characteristics of the therapy research that depart from the characteristics of clinical practice. Key areas of research are being neglected and this neglect greatly limits progress and what we know about treatment. Prominent among these is the neglect of research on the mechanisms of change and the moderators of treatment outcome. This article highlights progress, characteristics, and limitations of current therapy research. In addition, a research plan is offered to advance research by: 1) understanding the mechanisms or processes through which therapeutic change occurs; 2) drawing on developmental psychopathology research to inform treatment; and 3) expanding the range of questions that guide treatment research and the range of outcome domains on which treatment conclusions are based. [source]


Progression of Therapy Research and Clinical Application of Treatment Require Better Understanding of the Change Process

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 2 2001
Alan E. KazdinArticle first published online: 11 MAY 200
The stage model of therapy research focuses on the development of treatment from pilot work, through randomized controlled clinical trials, to tests in clinic settings. A goal of the model is to develop effective treatments that can be used clinically. The present comments begin with a similar goal but emphasize the importance of a broader agenda designed to understand therapy. A central thesis is that developing effective treatments depends heavily on investigations that address critical scientific questions; particularly, what are the mechanisms through which therapy operates and under what conditions is therapy likely to be effective and why? The comments argue for a portfolio of research that addresses a broader range of questions and encompasses more diverse methods of evaluating treatment. Breadth and diversity are not ends in themselves but will be essential to obtain the requisite knowledge to effect optimal changes in clinical applications of treatment. [source]