Tensile Ductility (tensile + ductility)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Strategies for Improving Tensile Ductility of Bulk Nanostructured Materials,

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATERIALS, Issue 8 2010
Yonghao Zhao
Abstract The low ductility that is consistently associated with bulk nanostructured (NS) materials has been identified as perhaps the single most critical issue that must be resolved before this novel class of materials can be used in a wide variety of applications. Not surprisingly, a number of published studies, published mostly after 2000, identify the issue of low ductility and describe strategies to improve ductility. Details of these strategies were discussed in review papers published by Koch and Ma in 2005 and 2006, respectively.15,16 In view of continued efforts and recent results, in this paper we describe progress in attempting to address the low ductility of NS materials, after 2006. We first analyze the fundamental reasons for the observed low ductility of bulk NS materials, and summarize early (prior to 2006) attempts to enhance the ductility of bulk NS materials, which often sacrificed the strength. Then, we review recent progress in developing strategies for improving the tensile ductility of bulk NS materials, which involve mainly microstructure modifications, after 2006. Different from early efforts, these new strategies strive to increase the tensile ductility while increasing/maintaining the strength simultaneously. In addition, the influence of tensile testing conditions, including temperature, strain rate, tensile specimen size and geometry, and strain measurement methods, on tensile ductility of NS materials will also be reviewed. Finally, we identify several issues that will require further, in depth analysis in the future. [source]


High-strain-rate Superplasticity in a Nanostructured Al-Mg Alloy

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATERIALS, Issue 4 2005
B. Q. Han
In this work, the authors report high-strain-rate superplasticity in a nanostructured Al-7.5%Mg alloy with a mean grain size of 90 nm processed via consolidation of cryomilled Al-Mg powders. Tensile ductility with an elongation of 291% was observed at a strain rate of 10-1 s-1 and at a temperature of 573 K. Noteworthy is the fact that the microstructure is essentially stable during testing at 573 K. Grain boundary sliding is suggested to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the superplastic deformation of the nanostructured Al-Mg alloy. [source]


Strategies for Improving Tensile Ductility of Bulk Nanostructured Materials,

ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATERIALS, Issue 8 2010
Yonghao Zhao
Abstract The low ductility that is consistently associated with bulk nanostructured (NS) materials has been identified as perhaps the single most critical issue that must be resolved before this novel class of materials can be used in a wide variety of applications. Not surprisingly, a number of published studies, published mostly after 2000, identify the issue of low ductility and describe strategies to improve ductility. Details of these strategies were discussed in review papers published by Koch and Ma in 2005 and 2006, respectively.15,16 In view of continued efforts and recent results, in this paper we describe progress in attempting to address the low ductility of NS materials, after 2006. We first analyze the fundamental reasons for the observed low ductility of bulk NS materials, and summarize early (prior to 2006) attempts to enhance the ductility of bulk NS materials, which often sacrificed the strength. Then, we review recent progress in developing strategies for improving the tensile ductility of bulk NS materials, which involve mainly microstructure modifications, after 2006. Different from early efforts, these new strategies strive to increase the tensile ductility while increasing/maintaining the strength simultaneously. In addition, the influence of tensile testing conditions, including temperature, strain rate, tensile specimen size and geometry, and strain measurement methods, on tensile ductility of NS materials will also be reviewed. Finally, we identify several issues that will require further, in depth analysis in the future. [source]


Bulk Metallic Glass Composites with Transformation-Mediated Work-Hardening and Ductility

ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 25 2010
Yuan Wu
A bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite with large tensile ductility and work-hardening capability (see figure) was developed by applying the "transformation-induced plasticity" concept to amorphous alloys. The current approach is not believed to be limited to the current BMG composite but could promote ductility in other BMG systems, offering a new paradigm for developing BMGs with improved ductility as practical engineering materials. [source]


Effect of Ultrasonication on the Microstructure and Tensile Elongation of Zirconia-Dispersed Alumina Ceramics Prepared by Colloidal Processing

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY, Issue 9 2001
Tohru S. Suzuki
To obtain dense, fine-grained ceramics, fine particles and advanced powder processing, such as colloidal processing, are needed. Al2O3 and ZrO2 particles are dispersed in colloidal suspensions by electrosteric repulsion because of polyelectrolyte absorbed on their surfaces. However, additional redispersion treatment such as ultrasonication is required to obtain dispersed suspensions because fine particles tend to agglomerate. The results demonstrate that ultrasonication is effective in improving particle dispersion in suspensions and producing a homogeneous fine microstructure of sintered materials. Superplastic tensile ductility is improved by ultrasonication in preparing suspensions because of the dense and homogeneous fine microstructure. [source]