Bank Behaviour (bank + behaviour)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Bank Behaviour and the Channel of Monetary Policy in Japan, 1965,1999

THE JAPANESE ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 3 2003
J. L. Ford
Using monthly data, this paper investigates whether there are differential effects of monetary policy across bank size and business size in Japan, to test the presence of the "bank lending channel" of monetary policy. It also considers that channel for the aggregate of banks. Prior to the end of 1984, support is found for the bank lending channel and also partly for the money channel. The study of the period from 1985 onwards suggests that no channel of monetary policy has been substantially effective in Japan. [source]


Assessing monetary rules performance across EMU countries

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FINANCE & ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2003
Carlo Altavilla
Abstract The topic covered in this paper is the performance of different monetary policy rules used as guidelines in practical policy making. To this end, different rules are evaluated using alternative econometrics techniques. A comparative analysis is made of the ability of the rules to correspond to the historical central bank behaviour and of the volatility of output, inflation and interest rate changes that they imply. The study is conducted of the EMU countries. The results suggest that simple rules perform quite well and that the advantages obtained from adopting an optimal control-based rule are not so great. Moreover, the addition of a forward-looking dimension and of an interest rate smoothing term in the reaction function seems to improve the performance of the rules. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Nominal Wage Flexibility, Wage Indexation and Monetary Union,

THE ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Issue 508 2006
Lars Calmfors
Membership in a monetary union implies stronger incentives for nominal wage flexibility in the form of wage indexation and shorter contract length than non-membership. This counteracts the stabilisation policy cost of giving up monetary independence. But more wage flexibility is only an imperfect substitute for an individual monetary policy. It is possible that an increase in wage flexibility is welfare-decreasing because of the accompanying rise in price variability. The interaction between wage setting and central bank behaviour may result in either multiple equilibria or a unique full-indexation equilibrium. [source]


Is the Lending Channel of Monetary Policy Dominant in Australia?

THE ECONOMIC RECORD, Issue 249 2004
Tomoya Suzuki
The transmission process of monetary policy is a longstanding macroeconomic issue. The lending view is that a monetary tightening affects aggregate demand by shifting the supply schedule of bank loans left. The contraction of bank loans does not necessarily mean a shift of the supply schedule. Therefore, testing the lending view requires the identification of the shifts of the demand and supply schedules in the bank loan market. This paper employs an original approach, finding that the lending channel is not dominant in Australia. The paper also examines features of Australian banks' behaviour which make the lending channel less dominant. [source]