B-cell NHL (b-cell + nhl)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Clinical characteristics and outcome analysis of pediatric B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
Experience with FAB-LMB 9, UKCCSG B-cell NHL guidelines in a developing country
Abstract Aim: To analyze the clinical characteristics of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients and the therapeutic efficacy of French-American-British Lymphoma Malins de Burkitt 96 and the recent United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group B-cell NHL guidelines in the tertiary care hospital of a developing country. Methods: Patients aged ,18 years registered at our hospital between January 1995 and December 2006 with histologically proved B-Cell NHL were selected for retrospective analysis. Results: Of the total of 131 patients registered, 122 patients were eligible for evaluation. Of these 95 had Burkitt's lymphoma, 22 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and five had B-cell NHL not otherwise specified. The mean age was 8.4 years. Overall 42 children had a baseline weight less than the 10th centile. A total of 37 had uric acid >10 mg/dl and 55 had a lactate dehydrogenase level >500; 73 had stage III and 31 had stage IV while only four presented at stage I and 14 at stage II. The abdomen was the commonest site of disease. A total of 45 patients died; 28 due to infection, nine due to tumor lysis syndrome and six of uncontrolled disease. All deaths occurred within an average of 35 days from starting treatment. Our 5-year overall survival rate was 68 percent and our event-free survival was 55 percent. Conclusion: Late presentation with advanced disease, poor nutritional status and high risk of exposure to infective agents all contribute to the high mortality in patients treated with intensive protocols in resource-poor countries. [source]


Nuclear morphometry and texture analysis of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Utility in subclassification on cytosmears

DIAGNOSTIC CYTOPATHOLOGY, Issue 2 2010
Shilpa Gupta M.D.
Abstract Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid neoplasms and accurate subclassification is an essential prerequisite for proper management of patients. This study was aimed at evaluating the utility of nuclear morphometry and textural features on cytology smears to classify the cases of NHL on aspiration cytology. Fine needle aspiration smears of 50 cases of B-cell NHL were included. Various morphometric and texture parameters were obtained by manually tracing the nuclei on digitized images in each case and discriminant analysis performed using various features taken individually as well as all together. The percentage of cells correctly classified to a particular NHL subtype using the discriminant functions so obtained was noted. Our results show that discriminant analysis done on size parameters could correctly classify a greater number of cells than on shape parameters (36.4% vs. 21.2%, respectively). Texture parameters based on single pixel values (first order texture) were inferior (42.8%) to those based on pair of pixels (58.7%) in subtyping of cells. Discriminant analysis based on color parameters was more effective (61.9%) as compared to rest of the morphometric and textural parameters. Using all the morphometric and textural parameters together, 83.3% of cells could be correctly classified to a particular NHL subtype. The present study, perhaps the first study of detailed morphometric analysis on cytosmears, shows that satisfactory classification of NHL on aspiration cytology is possible using nuclear morphometry and textural parameters considered together. These results are promising for further studies on this subject and development of automated cytodiagnosis. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2010. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Loss of CD20 expression in relapsed lymphomas after rituximab therapy

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 5 2003
Joud H. Haidar
Abstract: The response rate at relapse to rituximab in prior responders B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients is below 50%. Loss of CD20 expression after rituximab therapy may explain this secondary resistance. However, the frequency of CD20 negative relapses cannot be assessed since most patients that relapsed after rituximab therapy have not been re-biopsied. Here, we present two patients with CD20 positive low grade B-cell NHL that lost the cell surface and cytoplasmic expression at relapse after rituximab therapy. Our findings suggest that confirmation of CD20 expression on the malignant B cells is required whenever rituximab therapy is considered. [source]


Genetic and Environmental Risk Indicators in Canine Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas: Breed Associations and Geographic Distribution of 608 Cases Diagnosed throughout France over 1 Year

JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE, Issue 2 2009
M. Pastor
Background: The etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) is multifactorial. Environmental and genetic factors are frequently incriminated both in humans and dogs. Objectives: Our purpose was to study the geographic distribution of canine NHL (CNHL) in France and to evaluate genetic and environmental influences. Animals: Six hundred and eight cases of CNHL, diagnosed throughout France over 1 year, were collected from 7 Veterinary Histopathologic Laboratories. Methods: Retrospective study. Breeds affected by lymphomas were compared with the national population and associations between breed and immunophenotype were studied. The distribution of CNHL and canine T-cell NHL per 100,000 dogs per department was compared with the distribution of waste incinerators, polluted sites, and radioactive waste. Results: The breeds significantly overrepresented among lymphoma cases were Boxer, Setter, and Cocker Spaniel (P < .001). There was a significant association between Boxer and T-cell NHL (P < .001), and between German Shepherd and Rottweiler and B-cell NHL (P < .01). The geographic distribution of CNHL and canine T-cell NHL indicated significant heterogeneity. Significant association between distributions of CNHL and waste incinerators (,= 0.25, P < .05), polluted sites (,= 0.36, P < .001), and radioactive waste (,= 0.51, P < .001) was found. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Influence of genetics in the development of CNHL was supported by the existence of an association between breed and immunophenotype. Waste incinerators, polluted sites, and radioactive waste could just be considered as risk indicators of CNHL, but not as risk factors. Case-control studies around critical sites are necessary to confirm the implication of those environmental factors in the development of CNHL. [source]


Clinical characteristics and outcome analysis of pediatric B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
Experience with FAB-LMB 9, UKCCSG B-cell NHL guidelines in a developing country
Abstract Aim: To analyze the clinical characteristics of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients and the therapeutic efficacy of French-American-British Lymphoma Malins de Burkitt 96 and the recent United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group B-cell NHL guidelines in the tertiary care hospital of a developing country. Methods: Patients aged ,18 years registered at our hospital between January 1995 and December 2006 with histologically proved B-Cell NHL were selected for retrospective analysis. Results: Of the total of 131 patients registered, 122 patients were eligible for evaluation. Of these 95 had Burkitt's lymphoma, 22 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and five had B-cell NHL not otherwise specified. The mean age was 8.4 years. Overall 42 children had a baseline weight less than the 10th centile. A total of 37 had uric acid >10 mg/dl and 55 had a lactate dehydrogenase level >500; 73 had stage III and 31 had stage IV while only four presented at stage I and 14 at stage II. The abdomen was the commonest site of disease. A total of 45 patients died; 28 due to infection, nine due to tumor lysis syndrome and six of uncontrolled disease. All deaths occurred within an average of 35 days from starting treatment. Our 5-year overall survival rate was 68 percent and our event-free survival was 55 percent. Conclusion: Late presentation with advanced disease, poor nutritional status and high risk of exposure to infective agents all contribute to the high mortality in patients treated with intensive protocols in resource-poor countries. [source]


Localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with B-cell histology: cure without cyclophosphamide?

BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 4 2003
1996), A report of the United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group on studies NHL 850, NHL 9001 (198
Summary. We have examined the outcome for children treated on two consecutive United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group studies of localized B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The first study (NHL 8501; 1985,1989) included cyclophosphamide in the treatment regimen at a total cumulative dose of 4 g/m2 whereas the regimen in the succeeding study (NHL 9001; 1990,1996) did not include cyclophosphamide. Ninety children with confirmed B-cell NHL were treated in the two studies (NHL 8501, n = 33 and NHL9001, n = 57). With a median follow-up of 75 years, overall survival for localized B-cell NHL did not differ between the two regimens with observed 3-year survivals of 94%[95% confidence interval (CI) 80,98%] and 89% (95% CI 79,95%) respectively (P = 047). There was also no difference in the event-free survival between children treated on regimen NHL 8501 and NHL 9001 [91% (95% CI 76,97%) vs 84% (95% CI 73,92%) after 3 years; P = 034]. Although the difference in the number of failed remissions between NHL 8501 and 9001 (0/33 vs 6/57) approached statistical significance (P = 008, Fisher's exact test), there was no overall statistical difference between the treatment failures on either regimen (P = 034). Substantial long-term survival can be achieved for many children with localized B-cell NHL without the use of cyclophosphamide. Further studies are needed to identify whether all clinical or histopathological subgroups will benefit equally from the omission of cyclophosphamide. [source]