Sleep Diaries (sleep + diary)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences


Selected Abstracts


Treatment of sleep problems in families with young children: effects of treatment on family well-being

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 1 2004
B EckerbergArticle first published online: 2 JAN 200
Aim: To evaluate a standardized sleep programme that is a two-step variation of graduated extinction, where the child is first taught to fall asleep by him/herself at bedtime (first intervention) and two weeks later also after night awakenings (second intervention). As it has been claimed that extinction procedures may be harmful to the child, this study documents both night- and daytime behaviour before and after interventions. Method: The study included a total of 95 families, with children from 4 to 45 mo of age exhibiting frequent signalled awakening episodes during the night. Sleep diaries, visual analogue scales (VAS) on daytime behaviour and the Flint Infant Security scale, completed by parents, were used as instruments. Parents also completed VAS scales and the Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire scales on their own well-being. Results: All families carried out the interventions. Parents reported significant improvements in sleep quality, daytime behaviour and family well-being as early as two weeks after the first intervention. Before intervention, the sleep-disturbed children were rated as more insecure than a matched comparison group with unknown sleep behaviour. This difference was eliminated after the interventions. The more anxious the children were rated before intervention, the more they tended to benefit from it. Conclusion: If parents experience young children's night awakenings as a problem, teaching the children to fall asleep by themselves usually solves this problem quickly. According to parental ratings, family well-being and negative daytime behaviour are also improved [source]


Sleep and Headache Disorders: Clinical Recommendations for Headache Management

HEADACHE, Issue 2006
Jeanetta C. Rains PhD
Clinical practice points were drawn from a review of sleep and headache disorders published in the regular issue of Headache (released in tandem with this supplement). The recommendations include: (1) Sleep as well as psychiatric disorders tend to become prevalent in more complex and severe headache patterns and regulation of sleep and mood may favorably impact headache threshold; (2) Specific headache patterns, irrespective of headache diagnosis, are suggestive of a potential sleep disorder (eg, "awakening" or morning headache, chronic daily headache); (3) Sleep disorders most implicated with headache include obstructive sleep apnea, primary insomnia, and circadian phase abnormalities, and treatment of such sleep disorders may improve or resolve headache; (4) Inexpensive screening tools (eg, sleep history interview, headache/sleep diary, validated questionnaires, prediction equations) aid identification of patients warranting polysomnography; and (5) Pharmacologic and behavioral therapies are effective in the regulation of sleep and are compatible with usual headache care. [source]


Subjective and objective sleep among depressed and non-depressed postnatal women

ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2009
S. K. Dørheim
Objective:, Women sleep less in the postnatal period and it has been suggested that mothers diagnosed with depression alternatively could be suffering from the effects of chronic sleep deprivation. Method:, From a population-based study, we recruited 42 women, of whom 21 scored ,10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Sleep was registered by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), sleep diaries and actigraphy 2 months after delivery. Results:, There were significant differences in subjective sleep measured retrospectively by the PSQI between depressed and non-depressed women. In contrast, there were no significant differences in sleep measured prospectively by sleep diaries and actigraphy. Both depressed and non-depressed women had impaired sleep efficiency (82%) and were awake for about 1.5 h during the night. Primipara had worse sleep, measured by actigraphy, compared with multipara. Conclusion:, Measured objectively and prospectively, women with depression did not have worse sleep than non-depressed women. [source]


Disagreement between subjective and actigraphic measures of sleep duration in a population-based study of elderly persons,

JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, Issue 3 2008
JULIA F. VAN DEN BERG
Summary Sleep duration is an important concept in epidemiological studies. It characterizes a night's sleep or a person's sleep pattern, and is associated with numerous health outcomes. In most large studies, sleep duration is assessed with questionnaires or sleep diaries. As an alternative, actigraphy may be used, as it objectively measures sleep parameters and is feasible in large studies. However, actigraphy and sleep diaries may not measure exactly the same phenomenon. Our study aims to determine disagreement between actigraphic and diary estimates of sleep duration, and to investigate possible determinants of this disagreement. This investigation was embedded in the population-based Rotterdam Study. The study population consisted of 969 community-dwelling participants aged 57,97 years. Participants wore an actigraph and kept a sleep diary for, on average, six consecutive nights. Both measures were used to determine total sleep time (TST). In 34% of the participants, the estimated TST in the sleep diaries deviated more than 1 h from actigraphically measured TST. The level of disagreement between diary and actigraphic measures decreased with subjective and actigraphic measures of sleep quality, and increased with male gender, poor cognitive function and functional disability. Actigraphically measured poor sleep was often accompanied by longer subjective estimates of TST, whereas subjectively poor sleepers tended to report shorter TST in their diaries than was measured with actigraphy. We recommend, whenever possible, to use multiple measures of sleep duration, to perform analyses with both, and to examine the consistency of the results over assessment methods. [source]


Sleep during the Antarctic winter: preliminary observations on changing the spectral composition of artificial light

JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, Issue 3 2008
GAVIN FRANCIS
Summary Antarctic Base personnel live for 3 months in winter with no natural sunlight. This project compared sleep, by actigraphy, during periods of increased exposure to white light or blue enriched light in 2003. The primary aim was to help define the optimum spectral composition and intensity of artificial environmental light. Nine men and one woman (33 ± 7 years, mean ± SD), wore activity and light monitors continuously from 28.2 to 9.10, and kept sleep diaries. Extra light was provided by light boxes (standard white, 5300 K, or prototype blue enriched, 10 000K, Philips Lighting), which were turned on in bedrooms and in communal/work areas approximately 08.00,18.00 hours. After a no-treatment control period, 28.2,20.3, sequential 4,5 week periods of first white, then blue light, were imposed with a further control period 19.9,9.10. A limited baseline study in 2002 (no interventions) similarly measured light and activity in seven men and one woman (30 ± 7 years). Daily light exposure in winter (lux, mean ± SD) was doubled in 2003 (maximum 1039 ± 281, average 64 ± 21), compared to 2002 (572 ± 276 and 30 ± 11), P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, with no differences between white and blue light. There were no major differences in sleep between light conditions in 2003. A delay in sleep timing was found in midwinter compared to control (2003, bedtime, P < 0.05, sleep start, P < 0.05, sleep end, P < 0.01) and sleep fragmentation increased (P < 0.05). Sleep efficiency was slightly higher during all blue light periods compared to all white periods (P < 0.05). The use of higher intensity light of suitable spectral composition is proposed. [source]


LUTS/BPH in clinical practice: the importance of nocturia and quality of sleep

BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 2006
EMMANUEL CHARTIER-KASTLER
Various studies indicate that nocturia is one of the most bothersome of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH). Nocturia has a negative impact on quality of sleep (QoS), which might lead to daytime fatigue, reduced performance the next day and might ultimately affect the patient's overall quality of life (QoL). However, the evaluation of a patient with LUTS/BPH and assessment of benefits of LUTS/BPH treatment are mainly focused on voiding symptoms or flow rate, and the impact of nocturia on the patient's QoL is often neglected. At the Sixth International Consultation on Prostate Cancer and Prostate Diseases in 2005, a discussion forum about nocturia and its impact on QoS and QoL was organized, followed by a meeting of an expert consensus panel. Both recognized the importance of assessing nocturia and its impact on QoS and QoL in the initial evaluation of patients with LUTS/BPH, and in assessing the benefits of (new) LUTS/BPH treatments. However, currently used instruments that measure the severity of nocturia and its impact on QoS and QoL were not specifically designed for this purpose and lack sensitivity. At the expert consensus meeting, the expert panel stated that new instruments are required that can fully monitor the impact of nocturia on QoS and QoL. Potential new instruments that address these requirements are nocturia-specific questionnaires such as the Nocturia QoL questionnaire. Furthermore, the expert panel acknowledged the assessment of ,hours of undisturbed sleep' (HUS) as a potential new method to evaluate the impact of nocturia on QoS and QoL. HUS refers to the time from falling asleep to the first awakening to void. Sleep assessment tools such as sleep diaries and actigraphy are potential instruments to measure HUS. [source]


Quantifying subjective assessment of sleep and life-quality in antidepressant-treated depressed patients

HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL, Issue 1 2003
Andrew G. Mayers
Abstract This study sought to establish a method of quantifying subjective perceptions of sleep against perceptions of life-quality and mood, using amended versions of the Pittsburgh sleep diary (PghSD) and quality of life of insomniacs (QOLI) questionnaire. Diaries and questionnaires were self-completed in participants' homes. Outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder were compared with a healthy control group (with no history, or family history, of depression). Poorer sleepers, as determined by the sleep diary, were significantly more likely to report poorer life-quality and mood perceptions on the subsequent questionnaire. Furthermore, the depressed group reported significantly poorer perceptions of sleep quality and poorer perceptions of life-quality and mood than the control group, even though estimates of sleep disturbance were similar. This may indicate that depressed individuals experience more ,sleep distress' than healthy individuals. These results confirm the extent of subjectively reported sleep disruption in depression and demonstrate the merit of combining the amended PghSD and QOLI to quantify sleep perceptions. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Disagreement between subjective and actigraphic measures of sleep duration in a population-based study of elderly persons,

JOURNAL OF SLEEP RESEARCH, Issue 3 2008
JULIA F. VAN DEN BERG
Summary Sleep duration is an important concept in epidemiological studies. It characterizes a night's sleep or a person's sleep pattern, and is associated with numerous health outcomes. In most large studies, sleep duration is assessed with questionnaires or sleep diaries. As an alternative, actigraphy may be used, as it objectively measures sleep parameters and is feasible in large studies. However, actigraphy and sleep diaries may not measure exactly the same phenomenon. Our study aims to determine disagreement between actigraphic and diary estimates of sleep duration, and to investigate possible determinants of this disagreement. This investigation was embedded in the population-based Rotterdam Study. The study population consisted of 969 community-dwelling participants aged 57,97 years. Participants wore an actigraph and kept a sleep diary for, on average, six consecutive nights. Both measures were used to determine total sleep time (TST). In 34% of the participants, the estimated TST in the sleep diaries deviated more than 1 h from actigraphically measured TST. The level of disagreement between diary and actigraphic measures decreased with subjective and actigraphic measures of sleep quality, and increased with male gender, poor cognitive function and functional disability. Actigraphically measured poor sleep was often accompanied by longer subjective estimates of TST, whereas subjectively poor sleepers tended to report shorter TST in their diaries than was measured with actigraphy. We recommend, whenever possible, to use multiple measures of sleep duration, to perform analyses with both, and to examine the consistency of the results over assessment methods. [source]


Playing a violent television game affects heart rate variability

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 1 2009
Malena Ivarsson
Abstract Objective: To investigate how playing a violent/nonviolent television game during the evening affects sympathetic and parasympathetic reactions during and after playing as well as sleep quality during the night after playing. Subjects and Methods: In total, 19 boys, 12,15 years of age, played television games on two occasions in their homes and participated once without gaming. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and physical activity were measured during gaming/participating and the night to follow using a portable combined heart rate and movement sensor. A sleep diary and questionnaires about gaming experiences and session-specific experiences were filled in. Criteria for Selection of Games: Violent game involves/rewards direct physical violence (no handguns) against another person, and nonviolent game involves/rewards no violence; same game design (,third-person game'); conducted in the same manner; no differences concerning motor activity; similar sound and light effects; no sexual content, violence against women or racial overtones. Results: During violent (vs. nonviolent) gaming, there was significantly higher activity of the very low frequency component of the HRV and total power. During the night after playing, very low frequency, low frequency and high frequency components were significantly higher during the violent (vs. nonviolent) condition, just as total power. There were no significant differences between the three conditions (violent/nonviolent/no gaming) with respect to an index reflecting subjectively perceived sleep difficulties. Nor was there any difference between violent and nonviolent condition for any single sleep item. Conclusion: Violent gaming induces different autonomic responses in boys compared to nonviolent gaming , during playing and during the following night , suggesting different emotional responses. Subjectively perceived sleep quality is not influenced after a single gaming experience. Future studies should address the development of the autonomic balance after gaming over longer time than a night, physiological adaptation to frequent gaming and potential gender differences. [source]