Quality Grade (quality + grade)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Automatic Quality Control of Cereals

IMAGING & MICROSCOPY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 2 2008
Image Acquisition, Intelligent Image Analysis
The increasing demands on the quality and consumption safety of grain imply, for food economy, increased expenditures for product and process supervision. Within the framework of the control of goods received and quality of the processing industries, various laboratory methods are applied at present to check the properties of the products and the observance of the standards. The control of the goods received decides whether the supplied goods will be accepted and allocated the status "healthy and customary" or whether the goods before storage in the silo have to be subjected to a special treatment in order to reduce impurities, moisture, etc. The evaluation of the quality features is especially important in order to store together grain of special quality grades or to process with regard to the desired quality grade of the final product. [source]


Genetic parameters for dry matter, energy and protein intake, and their relationships with performance and carcass traits in Japanese Black cattle

JOURNAL OF ANIMAL BREEDING AND GENETICS, Issue 1 2009
M.A. Hoque
Summary Genetic parameters for feed intake and performance traits of 514 bulls and carcass traits of 22 099 of their progeny, and the relationships of measures of feed intake with performance and carcass traits were estimated. Feed intake traits were dry matter intake (DMI), concentrate intake (CONI), roughage intake, ratio of roughage intake to DMI, metabolizable energy intake (MEI) and digestible crude protein intake (DCPI). Performance traits included daily gain, metabolic weight, live weight at the end of test, dry matter conversion ratio and residual feed intake. Progeny carcass traits were carcass weight, percentage of meat yield, rib eye area (REA), subcutaneous fat, marbling score, meat colour (MCS), fat colour (FCS) and meat quality grade. All the feed intake and performance traits were moderately heritable. The heritabilities for REA and MCS were moderate, and that for FCS was low, while those for the other carcass traits were high. Selection against DMI, CONI and DCPI would reduce excessive intake of feed, but would have undesirable effects on growth and most of the carcass traits. Selection against MEI would lead to improvements in feed efficiency and growth traits. Selection against DCPI would also improve feed efficiency; however, responses in growth traits would decrease. Results indicate that selection against MEI might be better than any other measures of feed intake to improve feed efficiency with simultaneous improvement in growth and most of the carcass traits. [source]


The perceived importance of veal meat attributes in consumer choice decisions

AGRIBUSINESS : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL, Issue 3 2001
Gale E. West
Animal scientists have recently found a way to produce extremely pale grain-fed veal, thus achieving high quality grade, while averting concerns over unethical treatment and medication residues in milk-fed veal production. Consumers, however, may reject pale cuts of veal labeled as "grain-fed." This article uses questionnaire data from six groceries in the province of Quebec, Canada, to investigate frequency of veal purchases and perceived importance of price, color, and production type as determinants of veal purchases. Consumers do not appear to have clear preferences for milk-fed veal characteristics. Frequency of consumption and importance of veal meat attributes were influenced more by variables of habit formation than by price, income, or education. The veal industry might be advised to encourage consumption of veal as a means to diversify consumers' meat menu. [Econ-Lit citations: D120, Q130] 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. [source]


Automatic Quality Control of Cereals

IMAGING & MICROSCOPY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 2 2008
Image Acquisition, Intelligent Image Analysis
The increasing demands on the quality and consumption safety of grain imply, for food economy, increased expenditures for product and process supervision. Within the framework of the control of goods received and quality of the processing industries, various laboratory methods are applied at present to check the properties of the products and the observance of the standards. The control of the goods received decides whether the supplied goods will be accepted and allocated the status "healthy and customary" or whether the goods before storage in the silo have to be subjected to a special treatment in order to reduce impurities, moisture, etc. The evaluation of the quality features is especially important in order to store together grain of special quality grades or to process with regard to the desired quality grade of the final product. [source]


The Paradox of Toughening During the Aging of Tender Steaks

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 6 2006
Jan Novakofski
ABSTRACT:, Aging is the practice of holding meat at low temperatures to improve tenderness that is the most important sensory attribute affecting consumer acceptability of beef. Because of the inconsistencies in measured tenderness changes during aging, we attempted to look at the relationship between aging and initial tenderness irrespective of animal age, genetics, or nutritional status. Cattle were selected to represent a full range of quality grades from Utility to Prime. Steaks from these cattle were aged in vacuum bags for 0, 7, or 14 d and tenderness characteristics were assessed. Steaks were cut from the frozen loin sections, thawed, and cooked on open hearth grills to 70 C. Sensory evaluation was completed by a 6-member trained sensory evaluation panel and Warner-Bratzler shear was determined. The average shear values decreased with aging time across most grade categories; however, improvement was not uniform. Steaks from Utility grade cattle improved the most while steaks of other grades improved less. Shear values overlapped a great deal across all grades and to gain a better understanding of changes with aging, steaks were grouped based on initial shear value differences of 1 kg. Shear value of the toughest steaks decreased the most during aging (,36%), while those with the lowest shear values increased (16%). The same pattern emerged when steaks were grouped by initial tenderness. These results suggest that initially tough steaks will benefit from aging while very tender steaks may be adversely affected. [source]