Organizational Flexibility (organizational + flexibility)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Determinants of Organizational Flexibility: A Study in an Emerging Economy

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2006
Andrés Hatum
This paper examines the processes of organizational adaptation and competitiveness of firms in an emerging economy. The study is set in the Argentinian context of the 1990s when a combination of economic and political change triggered a massive change in the competitive context of indigenous firms. Two highly flexible firms and two less-flexible firms are studied from the pharmaceutical and edible oil industries and longitudinal data are supplied to explore the determinants of organizational flexibility in those organizations. [source]


Organizational Flexibility in Western and Asian Firms: An Examination of Control and Safeguard Rules in Five Countries

CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES, Issue 1 2001
Ignace Ng
This paper examines the influence of family and government ownerships and of labour unions on the adoption of control and safeguard rules in Asian (Hong Kong, Korea, and Malaysia) and Western (Australia and Canada) organizations. Following Ng and Dastmalchian (1998), control rules are those rules applied to employees and their behaviour at work, whereas safeguard rules are designed to address managerial discretion. Using data from 119 organizations, of which 58 are from Asia and the remaining 61 from the West, the results show that, contrary to general expectations, government organizations from both regions are no more rules-oriented than their non-government counterparts. Another unexpected finding is that unionized Asian organizations have fewer safeguard rules, not only in comparison with nonunion Asian firms but also relative to unionized Western organizations. The results also show that Asian family organizations have fewer safeguard rules in comparison with both other Asian firms and other family firms in the West. Résumé Cette étude évalue l'influence que peuvent avoir les syn-dicats, les sociétés d'état et les grandes firmes familiales sur l'adoption de règies de conduite et de précaution dans un nombre de sociétés en Asie (Hong Hong, Corée du Sud, la Malaisie) et en Occident (au Canada et en Australie). Conformément aux précisions formulées dans Ng and Dastmalchian (1998), nous entendons par règies de conduites celles qui gouvernent le comporte-ment des employés au travail, tandis que par règies de précaution nous désignons celles qui ont pour objet la marge de manoeuvre des gestionnaires. En basant nos données sur 119 sociétés, dont 58 en Asie et 61 au Canada et en Australie, nos résultats démontrent que, con-trairement aux attentes générates, les sociétés d'état dans ces deux aires géographiques ne sont pas plus lourdement réglementées que leurs homologues non-gouvernementaux. Autre surprise: les sociétés en Asie dont la main d'oeuvre n'est pas syndiquée ont moins de régies de précaution, non settlement par rapport avec les organismes non-syndiqués en Asie, mais aussi en com-paraison des sociétés syndiqués au Canada et Australie. Enfin, les résultats démontrent aussi que les grandes firmes familiales en Asie ont moins de règies de précaution que les autres sociétés d'Asie et que les firmes familiales au Canada et en Australie. [source]


Toward a capabilities perspective of the small firm

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT REVIEWS, Issue 3 2001
Tony Fu-Lai Yu
This paper attempts to explain the competitive advantages of the small firm in the capabilities perspective. It begins by identifying the kinds of strategic assets possessed by small firms. It argues that entrepreneurship and a simple capital structure are the sources of dynamism for small firms. The relationship between the small firm's resources and its capabilities are then critically examined. In particular, the analysis focuses on the influences of strategic assets on the organizational flexibility , a significant source of competitive advantage enjoyed by small firms. The competitive attributes of small firms are further discussed in terms of firm's internal and external capabilities. Finally, the relationship between the small firm's capabilities and the choice of technology strategies is examined. [source]


The impact of creativity on performance in non-profits

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 4 2005
Hilton Barrett
This article examines how creative climate affects learning orientation and its relationship to organizational performance. The study also assesses creativity's link with market orientation, entrepreneurial orientation, and organizational flexibility. Past research on creativity climate has explored areas such as the arts, high-tech, information technology, media, and the sciences. The focus of this study is to assess creativity's role in managerial decision-making in the non-profit sector. Sound use of creativity can improve planning, implementation, and control by non-profit organization executives. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Knowledge management for corporate entrepreneurship and growth: a case study

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 1 2008
Fátima Guadamillas
This study presents a case of corporate entrepreneurship analyzed from a Knowledge-based perspective as an extension of the Resource-based View (RBV) of the firm. This approach proposes that the development of knowledge can underpin the growth of the firm through corporate entrepreneurship. Following this perspective, we analyze the way an established firm uses resources and capabilities, especially its accumulated knowledge, as a foundation on which to develop a growth strategy through diversification to related businesses in the fields of electronics and Information Technology (IT). Moreover, we identify some of the most important factors contributing to the success of this strategy, such as the internal development and integration of relevant technological knowledge, human resources (HR) policies, organizational flexibility, knowledge management tools based on IT, and purchase of companies and cooperation agreements for the acquisition of external knowledge. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Organizing Flexibility: The Flexible Firm in a New Century

BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 4 2001
Arne L. Kalleberg
Research on organizational flexibility should examine the linkages between numerical and functional flexibility. Unfortunately, studies of each type of flexibility generally neglect the other. Moreover, the most popular conception of the interplay between these two forms of flexibility , the core,periphery model , is incomplete in important ways. I discuss evidence and limitations of the core,periphery model of the flexible firm, and outline some promising attempts to conceptualize how organizations may combine functional and numerical flexibility. I focus mainly on the USA and the UK, though I also review evidence and issues involved in cross-national differences in organizational flexibility. [source]


Determinants of Organizational Flexibility: A Study in an Emerging Economy

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2006
Andrés Hatum
This paper examines the processes of organizational adaptation and competitiveness of firms in an emerging economy. The study is set in the Argentinian context of the 1990s when a combination of economic and political change triggered a massive change in the competitive context of indigenous firms. Two highly flexible firms and two less-flexible firms are studied from the pharmaceutical and edible oil industries and longitudinal data are supplied to explore the determinants of organizational flexibility in those organizations. [source]