Oculoplastic Surgery (oculoplastic + surgery)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Oculoplastic surgery: The essentials, by William P. Chen, MD, Thieme, New York, 2001, 512 pp

HEAD & NECK: JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENCES & SPECIALTIES OF THE HEAD AND NECK, Issue 3 2003
Adair Blackledge MD
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Radiosurgery versus carbon dioxide laser for dermatochalasis correction in Asians,

LASERS IN SURGERY AND MEDICINE, Issue 2 2007
Carol S. Yu MBBS (Hons), MRCS (Edin)
Abstract Background and Objectives Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser and radiosurgery are techniques commonly employed in oculoplastic surgery. However, there is no literature comparing their results in blepharoplasty. Study Design/Materials and Methods Twenty Chinese patients with dermatochalasis underwent radiosurgery in one upper eyelid and CO2 laser in the contralateral eyelid. Intraoperative time, hemorrhage, and pain control were assessed. Subjects were evaluated at postoperative 1 hour, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months for hemorrhage and wound healing by a masked assessor. Results All patients reported minimal pain with either technique. A significantly shorter operative time was achieved with CO2 laser, with better intraoperative hemostasis. There was no significant difference in postoperative hemorrhage and wound swelling between radiosurgery and CO2 laser. No significant intraoperative complications were noted. Conclusions Both radiosurgery and CO2 laser are equally safe and effective for upper lid blepharoplasty. CO2 laser achieves shorter operative time with superior intraoperative hemostasis. Lasers Surg. Med. 39:176,179, 2007. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Total intravenous anaesthesia for oculoplastic surgery in a patient with myasthenia gravis without high-dependency care

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 7 2003
S. Lam
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Old habits tie hard: an in vitro comparison of first-throw tension holding in Polyglycolic acid (Dexon S) and Polyglactin 910 (Coated Vicryl)

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL OPHTHALMOLOGY, Issue 2 2006
Thomas L Kersey MB BS
Abstract Purpose:, To compare the first-throw tension holding property of two braided absorbable sutures commonly used in oculoplastic surgery. Methods:, The study was an in vitro experimental model. 6/0 Polyglycolic acid (Dexon S) and 6/0 Polyglactin 910 (Coated Vicryl) were compared using an experimental model to determine first-throw knot security. A polypropylene suture (Surgipro 2) was included as a benchmark to judge the apparatus by, ensuring that our experiment could be designed independently of the test suture materials. Increasing metric loads were applied to the first double throw of a surgical knot. Each suture was tested to the point of knot slipping and the critical tension recorded. All the sutures were kept wet during use. Three variations of the experiment were undertaken: experiment 1 , two metal loops brought together by the test suture; experiment 2 , two strips of tissue brought together by the test suture; and experiment 3 , a knot tied over a metal bar coated in tissue. The tissue used was processed cross-linked porcine dermal collagen (Permacol). Each experiment was repeated three times for each suture type and the mean value taken. Results:, Experiment 1: Dexon S 12.2 g (11, 12, 13.5), Coated Vicryl 2.5 g (2.5, 2.5, 2.5) and Surgipro 2 2.3 g (2, 2, 3); experiment 2: Dexon S 33.33 g (30, 35, 35), Coated Vicryl 25 g (25, 25, 25) and Surgipro 2 5 g (5, 5, 5); experiment 3: Dexon S 100 g (100, 100, 100), Coated Vicryl 56.667 g (60, 55, 55) and Surgipro 2 5 g (5, 5, 5). Conclusions:, Dexon S-braided absorbable suture has significantly better first-throw knot security when compared with Coated Vicryl. This is an important property when suturing tissues under tension as it minimizes slippage before the locking throw is tied. [source]