Local Customs (local + custom)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


,The pooreste and sympleste sorte of people'?

HISTORICAL RESEARCH, Issue 208 2007
The selection of parish officers during the personal rule of Charles I
The successful implementation of Charles I's personal rule relied much on the co-operation of parish officers whose workload increased significantly in the sixteen-thirties. There is little evidence that the mounting pressure and conflicting loyalties Charles I's reform projects caused resulted in widespread unwillingness to serve as parish officer or led to a changing social composition among office-holders. Local customs continued to determine the appointments of officers. The frequent use of rotas in allocating parish offices, the fact that many parishioners served several terms of office, and the presence of men from all social strata of local communities among parish officers all suggest that Caroline parochial government was considerably inclusive and that the village Úlites continued to serve for crown and parish. Consequently, parish offices, including the demanding office of petty constable, did not experience a loss of prestige during the personal rule, but parishioners served because they accepted their turn or appreciated the status of the office. Many contemporaries may also have valued parish offices because they provided opportunities to adapt government policies to the political culture of the parish and to enforce only selectively some of the controversial schemes of the sixteen-thirties. [source]


Constructing Identities in Early Iron Age Thessaly: The Case of the Halos Tumuli

OXFORD JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGY, Issue 3 2002
Ioannis Georganas
This paper examines the Early Iron Age tumulus,cemetery of Halos in south,eastern Thessaly, with its unique cremation pyre,cairn combination. As there are no parallels for such combination of burial practices either in Thessaly or in any other area of the Greek world, it has usually been suggested that the tumuli were erected by people foreign to Thessaly, most probably of a northern origin. This paper presents evidence suggesting a local custom closely related to the desire to create a new identity. [source]


ETHICS BEYOND BORDERS: HOW HEALTH PROFESSIONALS EXPERIENCE ETHICS IN HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE AND DEVELOPMENT WORK

DEVELOPING WORLD BIOETHICS, Issue 2 2008
MATTHEW R. HUNT
ABSTRACT Health professionals are involved in humanitarian assistance and development work in many regions of the world. They participate in primary health care, immunization campaigns, clinic- and hospital-based care, rehabilitation and feeding programs. In the course of this work, clinicians are frequently exposed to complex ethical issues. This paper examines how health workers experience ethics in the course of humanitarian assistance and development work. A qualitative study was conducted to consider this question. Five core themes emerged from the data, including: tension between respecting local customs and imposing values; obstacles to providing adequate care; differing understandings of health and illness; questions of identity for health workers; and issues of trust and distrust. Recommendations are made for organizational strategies that could help aid agencies support and equip their staff as they respond to ethical issues. [source]


Anatomy of Autonomy: Assessing the Organizational Capacity and External Environment of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao

ASIAN POLITICS AND POLICY, Issue 2 2009
Benedict S. Jimenez
Decentralization and autonomy can potentially increase public sector efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability, as well as fulfill a conflict-mitigating role. There is no guarantee, however, that decentralization, once implemented, would automatically produce the expected benefits. Using the case of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) in the Philippines, this article explores the importance of organizational capacity and the cultural, political, and social conditions in the region to explain the performance of the autonomous government. The article concludes that for autonomy to work, the administrative and institutional capacity of the regional government should be revitalized and the current politico-administrative structure redesigned to accommodate local customs and practices and facilitate a consultative and collegial local governance arrangement. [source]