Life Course Perspective (life + course_perspective)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Parenthood, Childlessness, and Well-Being: A Life Course Perspective

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2010
Debra Umberson
This article reviews recent research (1999,2009) on the effects of parenthood on well-being. We use a life course framework to consider how parenting and childlessness influence well-being throughout the adult life course. We place particular emphasis on social contexts and how the impact of parenthood on well-being depends on marital status, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. We also consider how recent demographic shifts lead to new family arrangements that have implications for parenthood and well-being. These include stepparenting, parenting of grandchildren, and childlessness across the life course. [source]


Does what happens in group care stay in group care?

CHILD & FAMILY SOCIAL WORK, Issue 3 2010
The relationship between problem behaviour trajectories during care, post-placement functioning
ABSTRACT Residential programmes for youth may improve youth behaviour during placement, but it is not clear whether there is an association between a youth's behaviour pattern during placement and post-placement outcomes. Life course perspective has been used to understand longitudinal patterns and pathways, and new statistical methods have been developed to identify latent trajectory groups. This study used administrative data from a family-style group care programme to assess whether a youth's externalizing behaviour trajectory while in placement can significantly predict delinquency and adjustment outcomes at discharge and 6-month follow-up. Findings from multinomial logistic regression revealed a statistically significant relationship between a youth's behaviour trajectory class and outcomes. Behaviour pattern during care was a stronger predictor of outcome than cross-sectional measures such as other demographic factors, placement history or mental-health need indicators. [source]


Women's attitudes towards trade unions in the UK: a consideration of the distinction between full- and part-time workers

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS JOURNAL, Issue 5 2005
Jennifer TomlinsonArticle first published online: 1 SEP 200
ABSTRACT This article considers the attitudes and experiences of female full- and part-time workers towards trade unions. Expanding upon previous research it suggests that while the attitudes of full- and part-time workers towards trade unions are similar, experiences of trade unions are not: they depend upon the employment context and work history. A life course perspective is advanced, which examines women's employment contexts and transitions between full- and part-time work in order to further explain female part-timers' lower likelihood of unionising. [source]


Negotiating Inequality Among Adult Siblings: Two Case Studies

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2007
Ingrid Arnet Connidis
Qualitative instrumental case study analysis of adult siblings from 2 families explores how socioeconomic inequality among them affects their relationships to one another. Eight middle-aged siblings' observations of childhood, parental expectations, work and family history, lifestyle, and current sibling ties indicate that childhood interdependence, parallel parental treatment, similar intergenerational mobility, greater success of the younger rather than older siblings, and economic success due to other than individual effort facilitate smoother negotiations of material inequality and enhance the negotiation of sibling relationships as important sources of support. These new insights on negotiating sibling ties over time are related to various forms of capital, a life course perspective, and ambivalence, and point to fresh avenues for future research and theory. [source]


Stress in Childhood and Adulthood: Effects on Marital Quality Over Time

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 5 2005
Debra Umberson
We work from a stress and life course perspective to consider how stress affects trajectories of change in marital quality over time. Specifically, we ask whether stress is more likely to undermine the quality of marital experiences at different points in the life course. In addition, we ask whether the effects of adult stress on marital quality depend on childhood family stress experiences. Growth curve analysis of data from a national longitudinal survey (Americans' Changing Lives, N =1,059 married individuals) reveals no evidence of age differences in the effects of adult stress on subsequent trajectories of change in marital experiences. Our results, however, suggest that the effects of adult stress on marital quality may depend on childhood stress exposure. Stress in adulthood appears to take a cumulative toll on marriage over time,but this toll is paid primarily by individuals who report a more stressful childhood. This toll does not depend on the timing of stress in the adult life course. [source]


Welfare Reform and Teenage Pregnancy, Childbirth, and School Dropout

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 1 2004
Lingxin Hao
This study estimates the effect of welfare reform on adolescent behaviors using a difference-in-differences approach. After defining the prereform and reform cohorts and considering the life course development of adolescent behavior by following each cohort from age 14 to age 16, we compare the welfare-target and nontarget populations in the two cohorts. The difference-in-differences estimates are obtained using an event history model. Our analysis suggests that welfare reform has not reduced teenage fertility and school dropout. We find modest evidence that welfare reform is associated with higher risk of teenage births for girls in welfare families and higher risk of school dropout for girls in poor families. A combination of a difference-in-differences approach and a life course perspective can be a useful way to delineate the effect of societal-level change on family phenomena. [source]


Behavioral Outcomes for Substance-Exposed Adopted Children: Fourteen Years Postadoption

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 1 2008
LCSW, Thomas M. Crea Ph.D.
From a life course perspective, studies of cumulative disadvantage often identify early risk factors as predictors of poor outcomes. This study examined the influence of prenatal substance exposure on children's externalizing behaviors at 14 years postadoption. Using Wave 4 data from the California Long-Range Adoption Study, the authors employed growth curve modeling to examine behavioral trajectories of 275 children as influenced by foster care status, age at adoption, and gender. Outcomes are measured using a shortened Behavioral Problem Index. Prenatal exposure predicted elevated behavior problems that increased normatively compared with nonexposed children, and were not found to trigger the negative behavior sequelae once feared. Foster children tended to fare better over the life course than those adopted through other means, except for children adopted at older ages. Adopted children's problem behaviors may be directly associated with the success of their placements. The authors discuss implications for practice and future research. [source]


Envisioning Fatherhood: A Social Psychological Perspective on Young Men without Kids,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2000
William Marsiglio
Using in-depth interviews and a purposive sample of 32 men ages 16,30 who have not yet fathered a child, our grounded theory study examined how men envision aspects of fatherhood. Informed by symbolic interactionist and life course perspectives, our interpretive data analyses yielded two interrelated substantive dimensions: fatherhood readiness and fathering visions. We introduce five interrelated theoretical themes to sharpen our understanding of these dimensions, and discuss how these dimensions and themes inform interventions aimed at heightening young men's procreative responsibility. [source]