Knowledge Strategy (knowledge + strategy)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Alternative Knowledge Strategies, Competitive Environment, and Organizational Performance in Small Manufacturing Firms

ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2007
Paul E. Bierly III
This study examines the relationship between knowledge strategy (exploration or exploitation) and performance, and the possible moderating role of external environment variables. Results from a sample of small manufacturing firms indicate that exploration and exploitation are distinct and complementary constructs. The relationship between exploration and performance is linear and positive, while the relationship between exploitation and performance is concave, indicating that there is a point at which focusing on exploitation leads to reduced returns. Additionally, we find that the competitive environment moderates the relationship between exploitation and performance, such that exploitation has a stronger impact on performance in stable and high-tech environments than in dynamic and low-tech environments. Exploration also has a stronger impact on performance in high-tech environments than in low-tech environments. [source]


Knowledge strategy: Its relationship to environmental dynamism and complexity in product development

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 1 2010
Elena Revilla
Focusing on product development, this study extends the understanding of the environment-strategy framework and investigates the relative effect of two environmental variables, dynamism and complexity, on the product development knowledge strategy. Adopting a knowledge-based view, and assuming that the strategy's locus is knowledge creation (exploration) and knowledge application (exploitation), the study suggests that the development of a knowledge strategy is a managerial strategic choice that is related to the environment. The results of a survey on product development managers generally indicate that exploration and exploitation must be combined according to environmental factors by generating the alternative knowledge strategies of ambidexterity or punctuated equilibrium. Particularly, the study finds that in environments characterized by high levels of both dynamism and complexity product development efforts pursue and reinforce both explorative and exploitative activities through a knowledge strategy of ambidexterity. Though not perfectly supported, punctuated equilibrium seems to be a more plausible knowledge strategy in environmental contexts where either dynamism or complexity prevails. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Alternative Knowledge Strategies, Competitive Environment, and Organizational Performance in Small Manufacturing Firms

ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2007
Paul E. Bierly III
This study examines the relationship between knowledge strategy (exploration or exploitation) and performance, and the possible moderating role of external environment variables. Results from a sample of small manufacturing firms indicate that exploration and exploitation are distinct and complementary constructs. The relationship between exploration and performance is linear and positive, while the relationship between exploitation and performance is concave, indicating that there is a point at which focusing on exploitation leads to reduced returns. Additionally, we find that the competitive environment moderates the relationship between exploitation and performance, such that exploitation has a stronger impact on performance in stable and high-tech environments than in dynamic and low-tech environments. Exploration also has a stronger impact on performance in high-tech environments than in low-tech environments. [source]


Knowledge strategy: Its relationship to environmental dynamism and complexity in product development

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 1 2010
Elena Revilla
Focusing on product development, this study extends the understanding of the environment-strategy framework and investigates the relative effect of two environmental variables, dynamism and complexity, on the product development knowledge strategy. Adopting a knowledge-based view, and assuming that the strategy's locus is knowledge creation (exploration) and knowledge application (exploitation), the study suggests that the development of a knowledge strategy is a managerial strategic choice that is related to the environment. The results of a survey on product development managers generally indicate that exploration and exploitation must be combined according to environmental factors by generating the alternative knowledge strategies of ambidexterity or punctuated equilibrium. Particularly, the study finds that in environments characterized by high levels of both dynamism and complexity product development efforts pursue and reinforce both explorative and exploitative activities through a knowledge strategy of ambidexterity. Though not perfectly supported, punctuated equilibrium seems to be a more plausible knowledge strategy in environmental contexts where either dynamism or complexity prevails. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Defining a knowledge strategy framework for process aligned organizations: an IBM case

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 2 2008
Stephen McLaughlin
Many organizations struggling to capitalize on their knowledge assets tend to let their knowledge management systems emerge from existing IT systems and infrastructure. Within a complex business environment this can cause a mismatch between how knowledge assets are, and should be managed. In order to help organizations develop dynamic and effective KM systems, the authors' suggest that organizations need to re-think how knowledge is created and shared around their core business processes. To be more specific the author's contend that for organizations where inter/intra organizational collaboration is vital to overall end-to-end performance, such as in a supply chain, organizations need to consider first the relationship between what the authors see as four key components. These are knowledge strategy, core process optimization, core process performance and knowledge barriers. This paper will explain why these components are important, and the relationship between them. The findings put forward in this paper are based on research concerned with improving process performance through knowledge transfer. The research follows a critical theory approach to identify best knowledge transfer practice across complex organizations. The research is exploratory in nature and a case study methodology is used to support this line of inductive theory building. The findings presented are based on data collated within, and across IBM's integrated supply chain. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]