Knowledge Management Perspective (knowledge + management_perspective)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Improving the implementation of evidence-based practice: a knowledge management perspective

JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 3 2006
John Sandars MSc FRCGP MRCP CertEd
Abstract Experience of knowledge management initiatives in non-health care organizations can offer useful insights, and strategies, to implement evidence-based practice in health care. Knowledge management offers a structured process for the generation, storage, distribution and application of knowledge in organizations. This includes both tacit knowledge (personal experience) and explicit knowledge (evidence). Communities of practice are a key component of knowledge management and have been recognized to be essential for the implementation of change in organizations. It is within communities of practice that tacit knowledge is actively integrated with explicit knowledge. Organizational factors that limit the development of knowledge management, including communities of practice, in non-health care organizations need to be overcome if the potential is to be achieved within health care. [source]


A knowledge management perspective to evaluation of enterprise information portals

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 2 2002
Yong Jin Kim
The paper develops conceptual criteria for evaluating Enterprise Information Portal (EIP) systems in the context of knowledge management activities such as knowledge integration and application. The criteria have been drawn from an Activity theory perspective consisting of actors, community, object, tools, rules, and division of labor. It then discusses the characteristics of several commercial EIPs and evaluates one major commercial EIP in the context of the framework. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Managing electronic documents and work flows: Enterprise content management at work in nonprofit organizations

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 4 2007
Joel Iverson
Web management and knowledge management systems have made significant technological advances, culminating in large information management systems such as enterprise content management (ECM). ECM is a Web-based publishing system that manages large numbers of electronic documents and other Web assets intended for publication to Web portals and other complex Web sites. Work in nonprofit organizations can benefit from adopting new communication technologies that promote collaboration and enterprisewide knowledge management. The unique characteristics of ECM are enumerated and analyzed from a knowledge management perspective. We identify three stages of document life cycles in ECM implementations,content, reification, and commodification/process,as the content management model. We present the model as a mechanism for decision makers and scholars to use in evaluating the organizational impacts of systems such as ECM. We also argue that decision makers in nonprofit organizations should take care to avoid overly commodifying business processes in the final stage, where participation may be more beneficial than efficiency. [source]


Trust, collaboration, e-learning and organisational transformation

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 4 2003
Jon Mason
While theoretically distinct, learning and knowing are meshed in practice. This paper builds on this observation and argues that organisational transformation and the development of best practices in e-learning share some similar context. This is particularly evident when knowledge management perspectives are considered. Specifically, trust and collaboration are shown to be common enablers of both activities. A range of interrelated models is introduced with trust identified as prominent within a complex mix of processes and outputs that can be described in terms of interoperability. Collaboration and interoperability are identified as key organising principles in information-based and knowledge-based economies. Through collaboration common goals and mutual benefit are discerned and pursued; duplication of effort is minimised; innovation is stimulated. Achieving technical interoperability demands use of networks in ways that harness the aggregate capacity of disparate systems, applications and services. The resulting infrastructure matches requirements of both e-learning and organisational transformation. [source]