Knowledge Building (knowledge + building)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


KNOWLEDGE BUILDING AND OPTIMIZATION STRATEGIES FOR A PRODUCT USED IN DIFFERENT CARRIERS

JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 4 2002
HOWARD MOSKOWITZ
ABSTRACT This paper deals with the design and optimization of lemon juice, a common ingredient in different foods. Lemon juice is usually added for flavoring purposes to different foods, consumed under different conditions. Through experimental design and evaluation in multiple carriers, the product developer can identify the combination of ingredients in lemon juice which, in concert, generate an acceptable product. Through optimization, taking into account these different end-uses, the developer can create a product that will perform well in different types of carriers. [source]


Process of Knowledge Building in Educational Departments

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 6 2002
Abhijit Rao
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Pair designing as practice for enforcing and diffusing design knowledge

JOURNAL OF SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE AND EVOLUTION: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE, Issue 6 2005
Emilio Bellini
Abstract Evolving software's design requires that the members of the team acquire a deep and complete knowledge of the domain, the architectural components, and their integration. Such information is scarcely addressed within the design documentation and it is not trivial to derive it. A strategy for enforcing the consciousness of such hidden aspects of software's design is needed. One of the expected benefits of pair programming is fostering (tacit) knowledge building between the components of the pair and fastening its diffusion within the project's team. We have applied the paradigm of pair programming to the design phase and we have named it ,pair designing'. We have realized an experiment and a replica in order to understand if pair designing can be used as an effective means for diffusing and enforcing the design knowledge while evolving the system's design. The results suggest that pair designing could be a suitable means to disseminate and enforce design knowledge. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


An investigation of knowledge-building activities in an online community of practice at Subaru of America

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2009
Susan M. Land
Current approaches to workplace learning emphasize designing communities of practice that are intended to support both formal and informal knowledge acquisition. This article presents the design and research of a knowledge-based community of practice for Subaru, based on principles outlined by Scardamalia (2002) and Zhang, Scardamalia, Lamon, Messina, and Reeve (2007). The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which participants' interactions in the online community showed evidence of individual and collective knowledge building. We found evidence of knowledge building within online discussions in these areas: interactions around improvement of ideas, connection to workplace knowledge and practices, and building on or adopting the ideas of others. We also found significant gains in scores on an assessment of workplace customer service after participation in the online community of practice. [source]


The dynamics of an online knowledge building community: A 5-year longitudinal study

BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, Issue 3 2010
Jarkko Mylläri
This paper reports a 5-year design experiment on cumulative knowledge building as part of an international project. Through a longitudinal study and analysis of cumulative research data, we sought to answer the question, ,what happened and why in knowledge building?' Research data constitute messages which participants have written into a shared knowledge building database. A multi-method approach combing quantitative and qualitative data was adopted which integrated analysis of message generation, content analysis, network analysis, structure of message threads, discourse analysis and interviews. Conclusions are based on analysis of almost 2000 messages. Qualitative content analysis reveals 14 main categories of data. When the content of the messages are analysed, quantitatively cumulative trends emerge. When the frequencies of messages are plotted against time, peaks and troughs of message writing are revealed. The explanations for these patterns and variations are sought through interviews. Social network analysis shows that the network is centralised. The research literature suggests that decentralised networks are ideal, but in this particular case, the expert centralisation was beneficial for knowledge building in the collaborative and associated professional networks. The reasons for this are discussed. [source]