Knowledge Application (knowledge + application)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Balancing global and local strategic contexts: Expatriate knowledge transfer, applications, and learning within a transnational organization

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2007
J. Barry Hocking
We investigate how expatriates contribute to the transnational firm's strategic objectives of global efficiency, national ("local") responsiveness, and worldwide learning. We focus on expatriate knowledge application and experiential learning achievements, two assignment-based outcomes of potential strategic value to the firm. We assess how the individual's everyday knowledge access and communication activities, measured by frequency and geographic extent, affect these assignment outcomes. Within our case organization, a prototype transnational firm, we find that expatriate knowledge applications result from frequent knowledge access and communication with the corporate headquarters and other global units of the firm. In contrast, their experiential learning derives from frequent access to hostcountry (local) knowledge that subsequently is adapted to the global corporate context. From a practical perspective, we conclude that experiential learning is an invaluable resource for both present and future corporate assignments. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


A Knowledge Accessing Theory of Strategic Alliances

JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 1 2004
Robert M. Grant
ABSTRACT The emerging knowledge-based view of the firm offers new insight into the causes and management of interfirm alliances. However, the development of an effective knowledge-based theory of alliance formation has been inhibited by a simplistic view of alliances as vehicles for organizational learning in which strategic alliances have presumed to be motivated by firms' desire to acquire knowledge from one another. We argue that the primary advantage of alliances over both firms and markets is in accessing rather than acquiring knowledge. Building upon the distinction between the knowledge generation (,exploration') and knowledge application (,exploitation'), we show that alliances contribute to the efficiency in the application of knowledge; first, by improving the efficiency with which knowledge is integrated into the production of complex goods and services, and second, by increasing the efficiency with which knowledge is utilized. These static efficiency advantages of alliances are enhanced where there is uncertainty over future knowledge requirements and where new products offer early-mover advantages. Compared with alternative learning-based approaches to alliance formation, our proposed knowledge-accessing theory of alliances offers the advantages of greater theoretical rigour and consistency with general trends in alliance activity and corporate strategy. [source]


Knowledge strategy: Its relationship to environmental dynamism and complexity in product development

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 1 2010
Elena Revilla
Focusing on product development, this study extends the understanding of the environment-strategy framework and investigates the relative effect of two environmental variables, dynamism and complexity, on the product development knowledge strategy. Adopting a knowledge-based view, and assuming that the strategy's locus is knowledge creation (exploration) and knowledge application (exploitation), the study suggests that the development of a knowledge strategy is a managerial strategic choice that is related to the environment. The results of a survey on product development managers generally indicate that exploration and exploitation must be combined according to environmental factors by generating the alternative knowledge strategies of ambidexterity or punctuated equilibrium. Particularly, the study finds that in environments characterized by high levels of both dynamism and complexity product development efforts pursue and reinforce both explorative and exploitative activities through a knowledge strategy of ambidexterity. Though not perfectly supported, punctuated equilibrium seems to be a more plausible knowledge strategy in environmental contexts where either dynamism or complexity prevails. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Relationship of resident characteristics, attitudes, prior training and clinical knowledge to communication skills performance

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 1 2006
Toni Suzuki Laidlaw
Purpose, A substantial body of literature demonstrates that communication skills in medicine can be taught and retained through teaching and practice. Considerable evidence also reveals that characteristics such as gender, age, language and attitudes affect communication skills performance. Our study examined the characteristics, attitudes and prior communication skills training of residents to determine the relationship of each to patient,doctor communication. The relationship between communication skills proficiency and clinical knowledge application (biomedical and ethical) was also examined through the use of doctor-developed clinical content checklists, as very little research has been conducted in this area. Methods, A total of 78 first- and second-year residents across all departments at Dalhousie Medical School participated in a videotaped 4-station objective structured clinical examination presenting a range of communication and clinical knowledge challenges. A variety of instruments were used to gather information and assess performance. Two expert raters evaluated the videotapes. Results, Significant relationships were observed between resident characteristics, prior communication skills training, clinical knowledge and communication skills performance. Females, younger residents and residents with English as first language scored significantly higher, as did residents with prior communication skills training. A significant positive relationship was found between the clinical content checklist and communication performance. Gender was the only characteristic related significantly to attitudes. Conclusions, Gender, age, language and prior communication skills training are related to communication skills performance and have implications for resident education. The positive relationship between communication skills proficiency and clinical knowledge application is important and should be explored further. [source]


Lost in knowledge translation: Time for a map?

THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS, Issue 1 2006
Ian D. Graham PhD
Abstract There is confusion and misunderstanding about the concepts of knowledge translation, knowledge transfer, knowledge exchange, research utilization, implementation, diffusion, and dissemination. We review the terms and definitions used to describe the concept of moving knowledge into action. We also offer a conceptual framework for thinking about the process and integrate the roles of knowledge creation and knowledge application. The implications of knowledge translation for continuing education in the health professions include the need to base continuing education on the best available knowledge, the use of educational and other transfer strategies that are known to be effective, and the value of learning about planned-action theories to be better able to understand and influence change in practice settings. [source]


Balancing global and local strategic contexts: Expatriate knowledge transfer, applications, and learning within a transnational organization

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2007
J. Barry Hocking
We investigate how expatriates contribute to the transnational firm's strategic objectives of global efficiency, national ("local") responsiveness, and worldwide learning. We focus on expatriate knowledge application and experiential learning achievements, two assignment-based outcomes of potential strategic value to the firm. We assess how the individual's everyday knowledge access and communication activities, measured by frequency and geographic extent, affect these assignment outcomes. Within our case organization, a prototype transnational firm, we find that expatriate knowledge applications result from frequent knowledge access and communication with the corporate headquarters and other global units of the firm. In contrast, their experiential learning derives from frequent access to hostcountry (local) knowledge that subsequently is adapted to the global corporate context. From a practical perspective, we conclude that experiential learning is an invaluable resource for both present and future corporate assignments. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]