Kinship

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences

Terms modified by Kinship

  • kinship care
  • kinship coefficient
  • kinship relation
  • kinship relationships
  • kinship system
  • kinship tie

  • Selected Abstracts


    LÉVI-STRAUSS AND THE POLITICAL: THE ELEMENTARY STRUCTURES OF KINSHIP AND THE RESOLUTION OF RELATIONS BETWEEN INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND SETTLER STATES

    THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 3 2005
    Michael Asch
    This article addresses the contribution of Lévi-Strauss's The elementary structures of kinship to resolving political relations between indigenous peoples and the settler states. To this end, it explores his discussion of the origins of society within the context of Enlightenment-inspired political thought and concludes that he provides a unique, counter-hegemonic alternative to conventional narratives. It then shows how this argument thwarts the presumption in Canadian jurisprudence that indigenous peoples were automatically incorporated into the state through European settlement, and fosters an understanding that a relationship based on the concept of ,Treaty' as understood in indigenous political thought promotes a political relationship that affirms the integrity of all parties. [source]


    Altruism and Agency in the Family Firm: Exploring the Role of Family, Kinship, and Ethnicity

    ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Issue 6 2006
    Neri Karra
    This article examines the relationship between altruism and agency costs in family business through an in-depth case study of a family firm. We found that altruism reduced agency costs in the early stages of the business, but that agency problems increased as the venture became larger and more established. Moreover, we suggest that altruistic behavior need not be confined to family and close kin, but may extend through networks of distant kin and ethnic ties. We thus present a more complex view of the agency relationship in family business than is often portrayed in the existing literature. [source]


    Kinship and mobility during the prehistoric spread of farming: isotope evidence from the skeletons

    GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY BULLETIN OF THE GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY DIVISION, Issue 1 2006
    Alex Bentley
    First page of article [source]


    Agricultural Land, Gender and Kinship in Rural China and Vietnam: A Comparison of Two Villages

    JOURNAL OF AGRARIAN CHANGE, Issue 2 2009
    DANIÈLE BÉLANGER
    This study examines the impact of current land policies in China and Vietnam on women's entitlement to land, women's wellbeing and gender power relations. The ethnographic study of one village in each of the two countries contextualizes women's lives in the kinship and marriage system in which power and gender relations are embedded. Current land policies, when implemented in the existing kinship and marriage system, make women's entitlement to land more vulnerable than men's, limit women's choices and weaken their power position. Variations in kinship rules in the two countries lead to different outcomes. In the Chinese village the dominance of patrilocal marriage and exogamous marriages limits women's access to land, whereas in the Vietnamese village the rigid concentration of inheritance to males puts women in a difficult position. The comparison between communities of rural China and Vietnam reveals the importance of considering gender and kinship when studying the implementation and impact of land policies. [source]


    Kinship into the Peruvian Adoption Office: Reproducing Families, Producing the State

    JOURNAL OF LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
    Jessaca B. Leinaweaver
    First page of article [source]


    Producing and Editing Diagrams Using Co-Speech Gesture: Spatializing Nonspatial Relations in Explanations of Kinship in Laos

    JOURNAL OF LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
    N.J. Enfield
    This article presents a description of two sequences of talk by urban speakers of Lao (a southwestern Tai language spoken in Laos) in which co-speech gesture plays a central role in explanations of kinship relations and terminology. The speakers spontaneously use hand gestures and gaze to spatially diagram relationships that have no inherent spatial structure. The descriptive sections of the article are prefaced by a discussion of the semiotic complexity of illustrative gestures and gesture diagrams. Gestured signals feature iconic, indexical, and symbolic components, usually in combination, as well as using motion and three-dimensional space to convey meaning. Such diagrams show temporal persistence and structural integrity despite having been projected in midair by evanescent signals (i.e., handmovements anddirected gaze). Speakers sometimes need or want to revise these spatial representations without destroying their structural integrity. The need to "edit" gesture diagrams involves such techniques as hold-and-drag, hold-and-work-with-free-hand, reassignment-of-old-chunk-tonew-chunk, and move-body-into-new-space. [source]


    Perspectives on American Kinship in the Later 1990s

    JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2000
    Colleen L. Johnson
    This paper reviews the current status of kinship research in the United States and identifies factors that might account for the declining interest in the subject among family researchers. The analysis uses both structural and cultural factors to illustrate how they can determine the diversity in kinship functioning that ranges from those family systems where kinship relationships flourish and those where they play a small part in family life. The structural and demographic variables determine the numbers and availability of kin, whereas the cultural variables determine the norms that establish the motivation to sustain kinship bonds. To illustrate how these factors operate among subgroups in the United States, I analyze three types of kinship systems: the lineal emphasis in White families of the very old; the collateral emphasis in the families of their Black counterparts; and the egocentric emphasis of White suburban families that are undergoing marital change. [source]


    Kinship and social structure of bobcats (Lynx rufus) inferred from microsatellite and radio-telemetry data

    JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, Issue 4 2006
    J. E. Jane
    Abstract Kinship analysis using 12 microsatellites was compared with radio-telemetry data to examine the social structure of bobcats Lynx rufus in southern Texas. Genetically identified kinship relationships combined with capture data were used to reconstruct pedigrees. Three family groups were constructed from parent/offspring pairs identified from shared alleles. All parents identified by genetic analysis had established home ranges. Individuals with no distinct home ranges were not genetically observed to have offspring among the bobcats sampled. This suggests that establishing a home range is necessary for bobcats to breed. Of three identified male offspring and three identified female offspring, two female offspring were philopatric. These females became a part of the breeding population in their natal area. Among sibling pairs that included nine female and four male individuals, four females and one male were residents suggesting male-biased dispersal. [source]


    The Shared History: Unknotting Fictive Kinship and Legal Process

    LAW & SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
    Marie-Andrée Jacob
    This article looks in detail at a form of kinship that is contingently crafted and mobilized to achieve specific purposes. On the basis of ethnographic material collected among local actors within bodies that regulate kidney transplants in Israel, the objective of this article is to expand the sociolegal definition of fictive kinship. I use transplant relatedness to refer to the set of formal and informal norms that grow out of social and medico-legal practices in the field of kidney donations and sales; however, the form of fictive kinship that appears in this specific field tells us something broader about kinship as it is constructed and performed in legal processes more generally. The configuration of fictive kinship that is examined is the shared history (historia meshoutefet). I argue that in the present case, the shared history alters social and legal deep-seated understandings of kinship and ultimately makes the distinctions between allegedly real and pseudo-kinship collapse. [source]


    Book Reviews: The Circulation of Children: Kinship, Adoption, and Morality in Andean Peru by Jessaca Leinaweaver

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 3 2010
    Krista E. Van Vleet
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Kinship and Behavior in Primates

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 3 2006
    JAY R. KAPLAN
    Kinship and Behavior in Primates. Bernard Chapais and Carol M. Berman, eds. Oxford University Press, 2004. 507 pp. [source]


    The Circulation of Children: Kinship, Adoption, and Morality in Andean Peru by Jessaca B. Leinaweaver

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 2 2010
    MICHAEL D. HILL
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Race, Ethnicity and Nation: Perspectives from Kinship and Genetics edited by Peter Wade

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 2 2010
    JESSACA B. LEINAWEAVER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Performing Kinship: Narrative, Gender, and the Intimacies of Power in the Andes by Krista E. Van Vleet

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 2 2009
    JESSACA B. LEINAWEAVER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Beyond Kinship: Social and Material Reproduction in House Societies

    AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 4 2001
    Stephen Hugh-Jones
    Beyond Kinship: Social and Material Reproduction in House Societies Rosemary A. Joyce and Susan D. Gillespie, eds. Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press, 2000. 280 pp., maps, figures, notes, references, index. [source]


    Book review: Early Human Kinship: From Sex to Social Reproduction

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
    Peter B. Gray
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Book review: Primeval Kinship: How Pair-Bonding Gave Birth to Human Society

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
    Warren Shapiro
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Phenotypic approaches for understanding patterns of intracemetery biological variation

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue S43 2006
    Christopher M. Stojanowski
    Abstract This paper reviews studies of phenotypic inheritance and microevolutionary processes in archaeological populations using data on cranial and dental phenotypic variation, often referred to as paleogenetics or biodistance analysis. The estimation of biological distances between populations, or among individuals within populations, is one component of bioarchaeological research on past populations. In this overview, five approaches that focus on morphological variation within cemeteries are summarized: kinship and cemetery structure analysis, postmarital residence analysis, sample aggregate phenotypic variability, temporal microchronology, and age-structured phenotypic variation. Previous research, theoretical justifications, and methods are outlined for each topic. Case studies are presented that illustrate these theoretical and methodological bases, as well as demonstrate the kinds of inferences possible using these approaches. Kinship and cemetery structure analysis seeks to identify the members of family groups within larger cemeteries or determine whether cemeteries were kin-structured. Analysis of sex-specific phenotypic variation allows estimation of postmarital residence practices, which is important for understanding other aspects of prehistoric social organization. Analysis of aggregate phenotypic variability can be used to infer site formation processes or cemetery catchment area. The study of temporal microchronologies can be used to evaluate provisional archaeological chronologies or study microevolutionary processes such as adaptive selection or changing patterns of gene flow. Finally, age-structured phenotypic variation can be reflective of selection processes within populations or it can be used as a measure of morbidity, growth arrest, and early mortality within past populations. Use of phenotypic data as a genotypic proxy is theoretically sound, even at small scales of analysis. Yrbk Phys Anthropol 49:49,88, 2006. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Kinship and social bonds in female chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PRIMATOLOGY, Issue 10 2009
    Kevin Langergraber
    A large body of theoretical and empirical research suggests that kinship influences the development and maintenance of social bonds among group-living female mammals, and that human females may be unusual in the extent to which individuals form differentiated social relationships with nonrelatives. Here we combine behavioral observations of party association, spatial proximity, grooming, and space use with extensive molecular genetic analyses to determine whether female chimpanzees form strong social bonds with unrelated individuals of the same sex. We compare our results with those obtained from male chimpanzees who live in the same community and have been shown to form strong social bonds with each other. We demonstrate that party association is as good a predictor of spatial proximity and grooming in females as it is in males, that the highest party association indices are consistently found between female dyads, that the sexes do not differ in the long-term stability of their party association patterns, and that these results cannot be explained as a by-product of the tendency of females to selectively range in particular areas of the territory. We also show that close kin (i.e. mother,daughter and sibling dyads) are very rare, indicating that the vast majority of female dyads that form strong social bonds are not closely related. Additional analyses reveal that "subgroups" of females, consisting of individuals who frequently associate with one another in similar areas of the territory, do not consist of relatives. This suggests that a passive form of kin-biased dispersal, involving the differential migration of females from neighboring communities into subgroups, was also unlikely to be occurring. These results show that, as in males, kinship plays a limited role in structuring the intrasexual social relationships of female chimpanzees. Am. J. Primatol. 71:840,851, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Homosocial Desire on the Final Frontier: Kinship, the American Romance, and Deep Space Nine's "Erotic Triangles"

    THE JOURNAL OF POPULAR CULTURE, Issue 3 2003
    Lincoln Geraghty
    The Star Trek mission, to go where no one has gone before, has returned us to our own inner spaces. One could see the latest question raised by explorations in terms of how to respond when confronted by an awareness of irreducible difference concerning that which bounds and blinds individuals however they are conceived of and wherever they are. (Blair 1997, 88) [source]


    Kinship and beyond: the genealogical model reconsidered , Edited by Sandra Bamford & James Leach

    THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 2 2010
    Warren Shapiro
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Sorcery in the Era of ,Henry IV': Kinship, Mobility and Mortality in Buhera District, Zimbabwe

    THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 3 2002
    Jens A. Andersson
    Recent studies of witchcraft and sorcery in Africa have described this domain as an all,powerful and inescapable discourse. This article, on a migrant labour society in Zimbabwe, discloses a situation in which this discourse and its interpretation are contested. It shows how existential insecurity, which gives rise to witchcraft accusations, relates to the high incidence of HIV/AIDS,related illnesses and death , euphemistically called Henry IV (HIV). Witchcraft accusations arise within kin,based networks that span rural and urban geographical areas, as it is these networks that people depend upon for their livelihoods. Thus, this article stresses the important link between witchcraft and kinship in a society that is not geographically bound, revealing how witchcraft discourse is assigned a place relative to other social phenomena. [source]


    Interpreting the Legacy by Interpreting the Relationship: The Creation of an American Epic by Engaging in Native-American Kinship

    ANTHROPOLOGY & HUMANISM, Issue 2 2003
    Raymond A. Bucko
    Brian R. Holloway. Interpreting the Legacy: John Neihardt and Black Elk Speaks. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 2003. xiv. 220 pp. [source]


    Demystifying borderline personality: critique of the concept and unorthodox reflections on its natural kinship with the bipolar spectrum

    ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 6 2004
    Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica
    First page of article [source]


    The transformation of kinship and the family in late Anglo-Saxon England

    EARLY MEDIEVAL EUROPE, Issue 3 2001
    Andrew Wareham
    The development of the family into a small unit in which descent was traced almost exclusively through the male line is regarded as a major turning point in medieval European history. The early stages of the formation of agnatic kinship have usually been connected to strategies designed to preserve and retain control of patrimonies and castles, arising from the breakdown of public order. In this article it is suggested that the emergence of new kinship values was connected to the investment of aristocratic energy and resources in monastic programmes, and to subtle changes in lay involvement with the rituals associated with death and the salvation of souls. [source]


    The emergence of a private clientele for banks in the early eighteenth century: Hoare's Bank and some women customers1

    ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2008
    ANNE LAURENCE
    The records of Hoare's Bank and the correspondence of six of its women customers show how these women started to use the new banking services both for transferring money and for trading in the stock market. It is clear that alongside their use of the new facilities, older systems of money transfer remained important for customers. Much of the business of the bank and its customers, including their ventures into the stock market, took place within groups of people united by kinship, religion, and politics. [source]


    Components of Relationship Quality in Chimpanzees

    ETHOLOGY, Issue 9 2008
    Orlaith N. Fraser
    A novel approach to studying social relationships in captive adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) was taken by using principal components analysis (PCA) to extract three key components of relationship quality from nine behavioural variables. Based on the loadings of the behavioural variables, the components appeared to match previously hypothesized critical aspects of social relationships and were therefore labelled Value, Compatibility and Security. The effects of kinship, sex combination, age difference and time spent together on each of the relationship quality components were analysed. As expected, kin were found to have more valuable, compatible and secure relationships than non-kin. Female,female dyads were found to be more compatible than male,male or mixed-sex dyads, whereas the latter were found to be most secure. Partners of a similar age were found to have more secure and more valuable relationships than those with a larger age gap. Individuals that were together in the group for longer were more valuable and more compatible, but their relationships were found to be less secure than individuals that were together in the group for a shorter time. Although some of the results may be unexpected based on chimpanzee socio-ecology, they fit well overall with the history and social dynamics of the study group. The methods used confer a significant advantage in producing quantitative composite measures of each component of relationship quality, obtained in an objective manner. These findings therefore promote the use of such measures in future studies requiring an assessment of the qualities of dyadic social relationships. [source]


    Spatial Association in a Highly Inbred Ungulate Population: Evidence of Fine-Scale Kin Recognition

    ETHOLOGY, Issue 2 2008
    Jorge Cassinello
    We present the first evidence of fine-scale kin recognition, based on a continuous measure of relatedness, in ungulates. The spatial association between herdmates of a captive population of aoudad (Ammotragus lervia), where all the individuals are related, is analysed during resting time. Our goal was to estimate which factors influence individuals' associations. The study population is highly inbred, although it does not show serious deleterious effects caused by consanguinity. It comprises a single captive herd, reproducing freely and in good conditions for more than 10 yr. It emerges that kin, measured as the coefficient of relationship between two given herdmates, is the main factor determining the spatial association (e.g. average distance) of male,male and female,female dyads, as more-related individuals tend to rest closer to each other than less-related ones. As for male,female dyads, individuals of a similar age tend to stay closer. To rule out any familiarity confounding effects, individuals' cohabitation time in the herd was added as a random factor in the analyses. Concerning the type of dyad, mother,calf dyads are characterized by higher proximity than others, particularly during the suckling period, whereas males tend to stay closer to each other than females or male,female dyads, being also more kin-related. Female social rank does not influence spatial association between herdmates. These results are related to group composition of the species in the wild, which are characterized by intense mother,calf bonds and all-male groups that are probably kin-related. It is seen that adult male,female associations are not related to kinship, but to age similarity, which is in accord with the assumption that main family groups in the wild are formed by matrilineal lines, whereas males are the dispersing sex. [source]


    LABOUR AND LANDSCAPES: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LANDESQUE CAPITAL IN NINETEENTH CENTURY TANGANYIKA

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 3 2007
    N. Thomas Håkansson
    ABSTRACT. In a long-term and global perspective irrigated and terraced landscapes, landesque capital, have often been assumed to be closely associated with hierarchical political systems. However, research is accumulating that shows how kinship-based societies (including small chiefdoms) have also been responsible for constructing landesque capital without population pressure. We examine the political economy of landesque capital through the intersections of decentralized politics and regional economies. A crucial question guiding our research is why some kinship-based societies chose to invest their labour in landesque capital while others did not. Our analysis is based on a detailed examination of four relatively densely populated communities in late pre-colonial and early colonial Tanzania. By analysing labour processes as contingent and separate from political types of generalized economic systems over time we can identify the causal factors that direct labour and thus landscape formation as a process. The general conclusion of our investigation is that landesque investments occurred in cases where agriculture was the main source of long-term wealth flow irrespective of whether or not hierarchical political systems were present. However, while this factor may be a necessary condition it is not a sufficient cause. In the cases we examined, the configurations of world-systems connections and local social and economic circumstances combined to either produce investments in landesque capital or to pursue short-term strategies of extraction. [source]


    A wedding in the family: home making in a global kin network

    GLOBAL NETWORKS, Issue 3 2002
    Karen Fog Olwig
    Rituals such as weddings and funerals are significant for transnational family networks as events where scattered relatives meet and validate shared kinship and common origins. They are particularly important when taking place at a family ,home' that has been a centre of social and economic relations and locus of emotional attachment. This article analyses a wedding on a Caribbean island involving a large global family network, which occurred at a critical point in the family's history. It became an occasion when members asserted their notions of belonging rooted in the ,home', not just as members of a common kin group, but as persons whose life trajectories had involved them in different social, economic and geographical contexts. Individually they had dissimilar interpretations and expectations of their place in the home, and these were played out at the wedding. The gathering allowed a display of family solidarity, but was also a site where differing views of individuals' contribution to the global household were expressed, and rights to belong in the family home and, by implication, the island were contested. [source]