Kinase Anchoring Protein (kinase + anchoring_protein)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Poster Sessions AP01: Gene Expression and Regulation

JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, Issue 2001
J. M. Calandria
The formation of Cortico-Thalamic projections requires the precise spatial and temporal expression of proteins that are involved in the different stages of synaptogenesis. We reasoned that the underlying molecular mechanism of this process is the differential expression of genes that code for stage specific proteins. Our research objective was to identify the differential expressed mRNAs during the main stages of synapses formation, which starts at embryonic day 12 (E12) and finishes on the first postnatal days in the rat. We approach this problem using Differential Display technique on three distinct ages of rat cerebral cortex that were: E13, E18 and postnatal day 0 (P0). We found 80 differential bands using 54 random primers and 18 of them were cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis showed among others, a cDNA fragment highly homologous with the human A Kinase Anchoring Protein 450/350 also called CG-NAP. We found that this cDNA fragment homologous to AKAP was up regulated at E15 when cortical cells are undergoing active axogenesis. The expression pattern of this cDNA was confirmed by Real Time PCR. Our findings suggest a possible function for AKAP 450 in the regulation of the state of phosphorylation of centrosomal components during the initial stages of synapses formation during the establishment of Cortico-Thalamic connection. [source]


The Effects of Disruption of A Kinase Anchoring Protein,Protein Kinase A Association on Protein Kinase A Signalling in Neuroendocrine Melanotroph Cells of Xenopus laevis

JOURNAL OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, Issue 7 2006
G. J. H. Corstens
Abstract The secretory activity of melanotroph cells from Xenopus laevis is regulated by multiple neurotransmitters that act through adenylyl cyclase. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), acting on protein kinase A (PKA), stimulates the frequency of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and the secretory activity of the melanotroph cell. Anchoring of PKA near target proteins is essential for many PKA-regulated processes, and the family of A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) is involved in the compartmentalisation of PKA type II (PKA II) regulatory subunits. In the present study, we determined to what degree cAMP signalling in Xenopus melanotrophs depends on compartmentalised PKA II. For this purpose, a membrane-permeable stearated form of Ht31 (St-Ht31), which dislodges PKA II from AKAP (thus disrupting PKA II signalling), was used. The effect of St-Ht31 on both secretion of radiolabelled peptides and intracellular Ca2+ signalling by superfused Xenopus melanotrophs was assessed. St-Ht31 stimulated secretion but had no effect on Ca2+ signalling. We conclude Xenopus melanotrophs possess a St-Ht31-sensitive PKA II that is associated with the exocytosis machinery and, furthermore, that Ca2+ signalling is regulated by an AKAP-independent signalling system. Moreover, our results support a recent proposal that AKAP participates in regulating PKA activity independently from cAMP. [source]


Localization of the A kinase anchoring protein AKAP79 in the human hippocampus

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, Issue 4 2000
Attila Sík
Abstract The phosphorylation state of the proteins, regulated by phosphatases and kinases, plays an important role in signal transduction and long-term changes in neuronal excitability. In neurons, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC) and calcineurin (CN) are attached to a scaffold protein, A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP), thought to anchor these three enzymes to specific sites of action. However, the localization of AKAP, and the predicted sites of linked phosphatase and kinase activities, are still unknown at the fine structural level. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of AKAP79 in the hippocampus from postmortem human brains and lobectomy samples from patients with intractable epilepsy, using preembedding immunoperoxidase and immunogold histochemical methods. AKAP79 was found in the CA1, presubicular and subicular regions, mostly in pyramidal cell dendrites, whereas pyramidal cells in the CA3, CA2 regions and dentate granule cells were negative both in postmortem and in surgical samples. In some epileptic cases, the dentate molecular layer and hilar interneurons also became immunoreactive. At the subcellular level, AKAP79 immunoreactivity was present in postsynaptic profiles near, but not attached to, the postsynaptic density of asymmetrical (presumed excitatory) synapses. We conclude that the spatial selectivity for the action of certain kinases and phosphatases regulating various ligand- and voltage-gated channels may be ensured by the selective presence of their anchoring protein, AKAP79, at the majority of glutamatergic synapses in the CA1, but not in the CA2/CA3 regions, suggesting profound differences in signal transduction and long-term synaptic plasticity between these regions of the human hippocampus. [source]


The Effects of Disruption of A Kinase Anchoring Protein,Protein Kinase A Association on Protein Kinase A Signalling in Neuroendocrine Melanotroph Cells of Xenopus laevis

JOURNAL OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY, Issue 7 2006
G. J. H. Corstens
Abstract The secretory activity of melanotroph cells from Xenopus laevis is regulated by multiple neurotransmitters that act through adenylyl cyclase. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), acting on protein kinase A (PKA), stimulates the frequency of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and the secretory activity of the melanotroph cell. Anchoring of PKA near target proteins is essential for many PKA-regulated processes, and the family of A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) is involved in the compartmentalisation of PKA type II (PKA II) regulatory subunits. In the present study, we determined to what degree cAMP signalling in Xenopus melanotrophs depends on compartmentalised PKA II. For this purpose, a membrane-permeable stearated form of Ht31 (St-Ht31), which dislodges PKA II from AKAP (thus disrupting PKA II signalling), was used. The effect of St-Ht31 on both secretion of radiolabelled peptides and intracellular Ca2+ signalling by superfused Xenopus melanotrophs was assessed. St-Ht31 stimulated secretion but had no effect on Ca2+ signalling. We conclude Xenopus melanotrophs possess a St-Ht31-sensitive PKA II that is associated with the exocytosis machinery and, furthermore, that Ca2+ signalling is regulated by an AKAP-independent signalling system. Moreover, our results support a recent proposal that AKAP participates in regulating PKA activity independently from cAMP. [source]


cAMP microdomains and L-type Ca2+ channel regulation in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes

THE JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 3 2007
Sunita Warrier
Many different receptors can stimulate cAMP synthesis in the heart, but not all elicit the same functional responses. For example, it has been recognized for some time that prostaglandins such as PGE1 increase cAMP production and activate PKA, but they do not elicit responses like those produced by ,-adrenergic receptor (,AR) agonists such as isoproterenol (isoprenaline), even though both stimulate the same signalling pathway. In the present study, we confirm that isoproterenol, but not PGE1, is able to produce cAMP-dependent stimulation of the L-type Ca2+ current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. This is despite finding evidence that these cells express EP4 prostaglandin receptors, which are known to activate Gs -dependent signalling pathways. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensors that are either freely diffusible or bound to A kinase anchoring proteins, we demonstrate that the difference is due to the ability of isoproterenol to stimulate cAMP production in cytosolic and caveolar compartments of intact cardiac myocytes, while PGE1 only stimulates cAMP production in the cytosolic compartment. Unlike other receptor-mediated responses, compartmentation of PGE1 responses was not due to concurrent activation of a Gi -dependent signalling pathway or phosphodiesterase activity. Instead, compartmentation of the PGE1 response in cardiac myocytes appears to be due to transient stimulation of cAMP in a microdomain that can communicate directly with the bulk cytosolic compartment but not the caveolar compartment associated with ,AR regulation of L-type Ca2+ channel function. [source]