Kiwi Fruit (kiwi + fruit)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


PEELING AND THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF KIWI FRUIT

JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, Issue 4 2003
METIN GULDAS
Hand peeling of kiwi fruit has some disadvantages such as difficulty during peeling, increase of loss in weight and nutritional value. Peeling of kiwi fruits with alkali (NaOH) was investigated. Some chemical (acidity, pectin, and chlorophyll) and physical properties (Hunter color value and weight loss) of the fruits were determined after selected alkali peeling methods were used. Peeling methods at 80, 90 or 100C temperatures; in 13, 18 or 23% of NaOH solutions and for 3, 4 or 5 min durations were tested and compared with hand peeling. Weight (fruit tissue) loss in hand peeling was higher than alkali peeling. Peeling with alkali was easier. Nutritional value (ascorbic acid content) of alkali peeled fruits was higher than hand peeled kiwi fruit. Because of less weight loss, better green color and high pectin content the method including 15% of NaOH solution at 95C for 4 min was selected as most advantageous peeling method. [source]


Kiwi fruit is a significant allergen and is associated with differing patterns of reactivity in children and adults

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Issue 7 2004
J. S. A. Lucas
Summary Background Allergy to kiwi fruit appears increasingly common, but few studies have evaluated its clinical characteristics, or evaluated methods of investigating the allergy. Objective To characterize the clinical characteristics of kiwi fruit allergy and to study the role of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC), skin tests and specific IgE in the diagnosis of this food allergy. Methods Two-hundred and seventy-three subjects with a history suggestive of allergy to kiwi completed a questionnaire. Forty-five were investigated by DBPCFC, prick-to-prick skin testing with fresh kiwi pulp, and specific IgE measurement. Nineteen subjects were also skin tested using a commercially available solution. Results The most frequently reported symptoms were localized to the oral mucosa (65%), but severe symptoms (wheeze, cyanosis or collapse) were reported by 18% of subjects. Young children were significantly more likely than adults to react on their first known exposure (P<0.001), and to report severe symptoms (P=0.008). Twenty-four of 45 subjects (53%) had allergy confirmed by DBPCFC. Prick-to-prick skin test with fresh kiwi was positive in 93% of subjects who had allergy confirmed by DBPCFC, and also in 55% of subjects with a negative food challenge. The commercial extract was significantly less sensitive, but with fewer false-positive reactions. CAP sIgE was only positive in 54% of subjects who had a positive challenge. Conclusions Kiwi fruit should be considered a significant food allergen, capable of causing severe reactions, particularly in young children. DBPCFC confirmed allergy to kiwi fruit in 53% of the subjects tested, who had a previous history suggestive of kiwi allergy. Skin testing with fresh fruit has good sensitivity (93%), but poor specificity (45%) in this population. CAP sIgE and a commercially available skin test solution were both much less sensitive (54%; 75%) but had better specificity (90%; 67%). [source]


Food hypersensitivity among Finnish university students: association with atopic diseases

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Issue 5 2003
L. Mattila
Summary Background Food hypersensitivity (FH) is commonly suspected, especially among adults with atopic diseases. Symptoms of FH vary from oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to gastrointestinal, respiratory and systemic reactions. More data are needed regarding patient groups at risk for FH, and symptoms and foods responsible for the reactions. Methods FH was studied in 286 Finnish university students. Four study groups were selected: subjects (i) with current atopic dermatitis (AD) with or without allergic rhinoconjunctivits (ARC) or asthma (n = 41); (ii) with past AD with or without ARC or asthma (n = 89); (iii) with ARC or asthma (n = 69); (iv) without clinically confirmed atopic disease (n = 87). A thorough clinical examination was performed with a questionnaire specifying adverse events to foods. In addition, IgE specific to five foods, and skin prick tests to four foods were determined. Results FH was reported by 172 subjects (60.1%), more often by females (66.3%) than by males (47.9%) (P = 0.003). FH was most frequent among subjects with AD, among those with current AD in 73.2%, with past AD in 66.3%, and with ARC or asthma in 63.8%; 44.8% of subjects without any atopic disease reported FH. Kiwi fruit caused symptoms most frequently (38.4%), followed by milk (32.6%), apple (29.1%), tomato (27.9%), citrus fruits (25.0%), tree nuts (23.3%), and peanut (17.4%). A total of 720 separate symptoms to 25 food items were reported. OAS was most common (51.2%), followed by gastrointestinal symptoms (23.5%), worsening of AD (11.4%), urticaria (4.2%), rhinitis or conjunctivitis (5.7%) and asthma (4.0%). Severe reactions occurred in 3.5% (25/720). Negative IgE and skin prick test to foods predicted well negative history, but the value of positive test results was limited. Conclusions FH was reported most often by students with current AD and multiple atopic diseases. Severe reactions occurred especially in patients with ARC and asthma. After excluding lactose intolerance, milk hypersensitivity was frequently reported. [source]


PEELING AND THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF KIWI FRUIT

JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, Issue 4 2003
METIN GULDAS
Hand peeling of kiwi fruit has some disadvantages such as difficulty during peeling, increase of loss in weight and nutritional value. Peeling of kiwi fruits with alkali (NaOH) was investigated. Some chemical (acidity, pectin, and chlorophyll) and physical properties (Hunter color value and weight loss) of the fruits were determined after selected alkali peeling methods were used. Peeling methods at 80, 90 or 100C temperatures; in 13, 18 or 23% of NaOH solutions and for 3, 4 or 5 min durations were tested and compared with hand peeling. Weight (fruit tissue) loss in hand peeling was higher than alkali peeling. Peeling with alkali was easier. Nutritional value (ascorbic acid content) of alkali peeled fruits was higher than hand peeled kiwi fruit. Because of less weight loss, better green color and high pectin content the method including 15% of NaOH solution at 95C for 4 min was selected as most advantageous peeling method. [source]


Effect of Actinidin on the Protein Solubility, Water Holding Capacity, Texture, Electrophoretic Pattern of Beef, and on the Quality Attributes of a Sausage Product

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 3 2009
M. Aminlari
ABSTRACT:, The objective of this study was to study the effect of actinidin, a sulfhydryl protease from kiwi fruit, on the protein solubility (nitrogen solubility index [NSI]), water holding capacity (WHC), texture, and SDS,PAGE pattern of beef and to evaluate the effect of pretreatment of beef with actinidin on the quality attributes of a sausage product. Actinidin was partially purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, followed by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. Actinidin significantly (P < 0.05) increased NSI and WHC of beef; the highest NSI and WHC (approximately 20% and 8% increase, respectively) was observed when beef was incubated with 0.9 unit enzyme/g beef. Texture analysis indicated increased tenderization (10% decrease in shear force) when slices of cattle beef were treated with actinidin at 37 C for 2 h. SDS,PAGE results indicated appearance of several low molecular weight bands (<10 kDa) after treating beef with different levels of actinidin for 30 or 60 min. Slight changes in protein band in the range of 100 to 120 kDa and 13 to 25 kDa were also observed. Use of actinidin-tenderized beef significantly improved emulsion stability, texture, and organoleptic properties of the sausage product. [source]


Kiwi fruit is a significant allergen and is associated with differing patterns of reactivity in children and adults

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Issue 7 2004
J. S. A. Lucas
Summary Background Allergy to kiwi fruit appears increasingly common, but few studies have evaluated its clinical characteristics, or evaluated methods of investigating the allergy. Objective To characterize the clinical characteristics of kiwi fruit allergy and to study the role of double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC), skin tests and specific IgE in the diagnosis of this food allergy. Methods Two-hundred and seventy-three subjects with a history suggestive of allergy to kiwi completed a questionnaire. Forty-five were investigated by DBPCFC, prick-to-prick skin testing with fresh kiwi pulp, and specific IgE measurement. Nineteen subjects were also skin tested using a commercially available solution. Results The most frequently reported symptoms were localized to the oral mucosa (65%), but severe symptoms (wheeze, cyanosis or collapse) were reported by 18% of subjects. Young children were significantly more likely than adults to react on their first known exposure (P<0.001), and to report severe symptoms (P=0.008). Twenty-four of 45 subjects (53%) had allergy confirmed by DBPCFC. Prick-to-prick skin test with fresh kiwi was positive in 93% of subjects who had allergy confirmed by DBPCFC, and also in 55% of subjects with a negative food challenge. The commercial extract was significantly less sensitive, but with fewer false-positive reactions. CAP sIgE was only positive in 54% of subjects who had a positive challenge. Conclusions Kiwi fruit should be considered a significant food allergen, capable of causing severe reactions, particularly in young children. DBPCFC confirmed allergy to kiwi fruit in 53% of the subjects tested, who had a previous history suggestive of kiwi allergy. Skin testing with fresh fruit has good sensitivity (93%), but poor specificity (45%) in this population. CAP sIgE and a commercially available skin test solution were both much less sensitive (54%; 75%) but had better specificity (90%; 67%). [source]


Occurrence, ecology and potential impact of the New Zealand wheat bug Nysius huttoni White (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) in Belgium

EPPO BULLETIN, Issue 2 2010
J. Bonte
In 2002 the New Zealand wheat bug Nysius huttoni White was observed for the first time in the Netherlands and Belgium. The introduction of N. huttoni to these regions presumably occurred via overseas transport of apple and kiwi fruits from New Zealand. Laboratory experiments showed that both eggs and adults of N. huttoni were capable of surviving cold conditions similar to those in overseas transportation. Specimens were sampled in Belgium and the Netherlands, and a DNA sequence analysis indicated a 100% similarity with N. huttoni material collected in Christchurch, New Zealand. The distribution of the lygaeid in Belgium in 2008 was studied based on a systematic sampling at 105 locations. The bug had been able to spread over most of the Belgian territory, with the exception of the most southern and eastern provinces. Given the poor flight capacity of Belgian N. huttoni populations, other methods of dispersal may be involved. N. huttoni occurred primarily in ruderal habitats, and its weedy host plants belong to very common plant families. Several observations support N. huttoni not being a threat for agricultural crops in Belgium under the present conditions of climate and soil usage. [source]


PEELING AND THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF KIWI FRUIT

JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, Issue 4 2003
METIN GULDAS
Hand peeling of kiwi fruit has some disadvantages such as difficulty during peeling, increase of loss in weight and nutritional value. Peeling of kiwi fruits with alkali (NaOH) was investigated. Some chemical (acidity, pectin, and chlorophyll) and physical properties (Hunter color value and weight loss) of the fruits were determined after selected alkali peeling methods were used. Peeling methods at 80, 90 or 100C temperatures; in 13, 18 or 23% of NaOH solutions and for 3, 4 or 5 min durations were tested and compared with hand peeling. Weight (fruit tissue) loss in hand peeling was higher than alkali peeling. Peeling with alkali was easier. Nutritional value (ascorbic acid content) of alkali peeled fruits was higher than hand peeled kiwi fruit. Because of less weight loss, better green color and high pectin content the method including 15% of NaOH solution at 95C for 4 min was selected as most advantageous peeling method. [source]