Kimberley Region (kimberley + region)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


WELFARE, ENTERPRISE, AND ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY: THE CASE OF THE WESTERN AUSTRALIAN KIMBERLEY REGION, 1968,96

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2006
Tony Smith
Aboriginal; Australia; entrepreneurship; social policy This article traces the development of Aboriginal-controlled businesses and their ability to access land, labour, and finance in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. It investigates the influence of the development policies on Aboriginal commercial operations. Among other things, the implementation of a new policy , beginning in the early 1970s , saw the handing over by the state of large tracts of land, and the provision of labour and finance to Aboriginal interests. The article analyses the tension between land and enterprise as a welfare measure and as a means of commercial endeavour. [source]


Contemporary landscape burning patterns in the far North Kimberley region of north-west Australia: human influences and environmental determinants

JOURNAL OF BIOGEOGRAPHY, Issue 8 2004
T. Vigilante
Abstract Aim, This study of contemporary landscape burning patterns in the North Kimberley aims to determine the relative influences of environmental factors and compare the management regimes occurring on Aboriginal lands, pastoral leases, national park and crown land. Location, The study area is defined at the largest scale by Landsat Scene 108,70 that covers a total land area of 23,134 km2 in the North Kimberley Bioregion of north-west Australia, including the settlement of Kalumburu, coastline between Vansittart Bay in the west and the mouth of the Berkeley River in the east, and stretching approximately 200 km inland. Methods, Two approaches are applied. First, a 10-year fire history (1990,1999) derived from previous study of satellite (Landsat-MSS) remote sensing imagery is analysed for broad regional patterns. And secondly, a 2-year ground-based survey of burning along major access roads leading to an Aboriginal community is used to show fine-scale burning patterns. anova and multiple regression analyses are used to determine the influence of year, season, geology, tenure, distance from road and distance from settlement on fire patterns. Results, Satellite data indicated that an average of 30.8% (4.4% SEM) of the study area was burnt each year with considerable variability between years. Approximately 56% of the study area was burnt on three or more occasions over the 10-year period. A slightly higher proportion of burning occurred on average in the late dry season (17.2 3.6%), compared with the early dry season (13.6 3.3%). The highest fire frequency occurred on basalt substrates, on pastoral tenures, and at distances 5,25 km from roads. Three-way anova demonstrated that geological substrate and land use were the most significant factors influencing fire history, however a range of smaller interactions were also significant. Analysis of road transects, originating from an Aboriginal settlement, showed that the timing of fire and geology type were the most significant factors affecting the pattern of area burnt. Of the total transect area, 28.3 2.9% was burnt annually with peaks in burning occurring into the dry season months of June, August and September. Basalt uplands (81.2%) and lowlands (30.1%) had greater areas burnt than sandstone (12.3%) and sands (17.7%). Main conclusions, Anthropogenic firing is constrained by two major environmental determinants; climate and substrate. Seasonal peaks in burning activity in both the early and late dry season relate to periods of optimal fire-weather conditions. Substrate factors (geology, soils and physiognomy) influence vegetation-fuel characteristics and the movement of fire in the landscape. Basalt hills overwhelmingly supported the most frequent wildfire regime in the study region because of their undulating topography and relatively fertile soils that support perennial grasslands. Within these spatial and temporal constraints people significantly influenced the frequency and extent of fire in the North Kimberley thus tenure type and associated land uses had a significant influence on fire patterning. Burning activity is high on pastoral lands and along roads and tracks on some tenure types. While the state government uses aerial control burning and legislation to try to restrict burning to the early dry season across all geology types, in practice burning is being conducted across the full duration of the dry season with early dry season burning focused on sandstone and sand substrates and late dry season burning focused on basalt substrates. There is greater seasonal and spatial variation in burning patterns on landscapes managed by Aboriginal people. [source]


Phytoplasma from little leaf disease affected sweetpotato in Western Australia: detection and phylogeny

ANNALS OF APPLIED BIOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
F. Tairo
Abstract Symptoms of leaf and stem chlorosis and plant stunting were common in sweetpotato plants (Ipomoea batatas) in farmers' fields in two widely separated locations, Kununurra and Broome, in the tropical Kimberley region in the state of Western Australia in 2003 and 2004. In the glasshouse, progeny plants developed similar symptoms characteristic of phytoplasma infection, consisting of chlorosis and a stunted, bushy appearance as a result of proliferation of axillary shoots. The same symptoms were reproduced in the African sweetpotato cv. Tanzania grafted with scions from the plant Aus1 with symptoms and in which no viruses were detected. PCR amplification with phytoplasma-specific primers and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA gene region from two plants with symptoms, Aus1 (Broome) and Aus142A (Kununurra), revealed highly identical sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from previously described sweetpotato phytoplasma and inclusion of other selected phytoplasma for comparison indicated that Aus1 and Aus142A belonged to the Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia species (16SrII). The 16S genes of Aus1 and Aus142A were almost identical to those of sweet potato little leaf (SPLL-V4) phytoplasma from Australia (99.3%,99.4%) but different from those of the sweetpotato phytoplasma from Taiwan (95.5%,95.6%) and Uganda (SPLL-UG, 90.0%,90.1%). Phylogenetically, Aus1, Aus142A and a phytoplasma previously described from sweetpotato in the Northern Territory of Australia formed a group distinctly different from other isolates within Ca. Phytoplasma aurantifolia species. These findings indicate that novel isolates of the 16SrII-type phytoplasma pose a potential threat to sustainable sweetpotato production in northern Australia. [source]


WELFARE, ENTERPRISE, AND ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY: THE CASE OF THE WESTERN AUSTRALIAN KIMBERLEY REGION, 1968,96

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2006
Tony Smith
Aboriginal; Australia; entrepreneurship; social policy This article traces the development of Aboriginal-controlled businesses and their ability to access land, labour, and finance in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. It investigates the influence of the development policies on Aboriginal commercial operations. Among other things, the implementation of a new policy , beginning in the early 1970s , saw the handing over by the state of large tracts of land, and the provision of labour and finance to Aboriginal interests. The article analyses the tension between land and enterprise as a welfare measure and as a means of commercial endeavour. [source]


Deep, hierarchical divergence of mitochondrial DNA in Amplirhagada land snails (Gastropoda: Camaenidae) from the Bonaparte Archipelago, Western Australia

BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, Issue 1 2010
MICHAEL S. JOHNSON
Continental islands have experienced cycles of isolation and connection. Although complex genetic patterns have been described for mainland species affected by glacial cycles of isolation, island biotas have received little attention. We examined mitochondrial DNA in Amplirhagada land snails from 16 islands and two adjacent mainland areas of the Bonaparte Archipelago, in the Kimberley region of northern Western Australia. Four major clades, with sequence divergence of 16,27% in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, correspond to the major geographic groupings, separated by 10,160 km. Distinct lineages also characterize islands that are only a few kilometres apart. The large differences indicate that the lineages are much older than the islands themselves, and show no evidence of geologically recent connection. Three of the major clades match the morphological description of Amplirhagada alta. Either this named species comprises several morphologically cryptic species, or it is a single, genetically very diverse species, distributed over much of the Bonaparte Archipelago. 2010 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2010, 100, 141,153. [source]