Keynote Address (keynote + address)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


On Common Ground Keynote Address at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Association of Public Health Dentistry and the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2001
Burton Edelstein DDS
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Keynote Address: Closing the Research-to-practice Gap in Emergency Medicine

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 11 2007
Carolyn M. Clancy MD
Emergency medicine in the United States is facing tremendous challenges due to recent public health emergencies, continuing threats of bioterrorism, and an increasing and unprecedented demand for emergency department services. These challenges include overcrowding; long waiting times; "boarding" of patients; ambulance diversion; a need for better, more reliable tools for triaging patients; and medical errors and other patient safety concerns. These challenges and concerns were brought to the forefront several years ago by the Institute of Medicine in several landmark reports that call for closing the research-to-practice gap in emergency medicine. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is funding a number of projects that address many of the concerns raised in the reports, including the use of an advanced access appointment scheduling system to improve access to care; the use of an electronic medical record system to reduce waiting times and errors and improve patient and provider satisfaction; and the refinement of the Emergency Severity Index, a five-level triage scale to get patients to the right resources at the right time. The agency's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project is gathering data that will allow researchers to examine a broad range of issues affecting the use, quality, and cost of emergency services. Although progress has been made over the past few years in closing the research-to-practice gap in emergency medicine, many challenges remain. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has supported and will continue to support a broad portfolio of research to address the many challenges confronting emergency medicine, including ways to improve emergency care through the application of research findings. [source]


Keynote address as presented by Stephen Lewis at the 2008 ASAC conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

CANADIAN JOURNAL OF ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES, Issue 4 2008
Stephen Lewis
First page of article [source]


Learning, Literacy and ICT: What's the Connection?

ENGLISH IN EDUCATION, Issue 3 2000
Richard Andrews
Abstract This article takes the form of a keynote address to delegates at the ,Raising Standards through Literacy and ICT across the Curriculum at Key Stages 3 and 4 conference', held at Middlesex University, London in July 2000. It sets out by defining the terms ,learning', ,literacy' and ,ICT' and then proceeds to make connections between the areas they denote. The main connections are seen to be the increased reciprocity of reading and writing, the contiguity of the verbal and visual in contemporary communication and the re-establishment of composition at the heart of the literacy curriculum. Central to all of these is the importance of transformation in learning, not only in theory but also in the day-to-day practices of classrooms. Recent research into ICT and literacy is reviewed, practical possibilities for cross-curricular collaboration are offered, and implications for the future are considered. [source]


EFA Keynote Speech: "Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility: What Do Investors Care about?

FINANCIAL REVIEW, Issue 4 2009
What Should Investors Care about?"
G34 Abstract This article is the keynote address from the Eastern Finance Association meeting in New Orleans in March 2007 with updated references and examples. In this keynote address, I discuss what we can learn about institutional investors' views on corporate governance and corporate social responsibility from research and surveys. [source]


Basic skills revisited,and rewarded,in CPR's annual awards

ALTERNATIVES TO THE HIGH COST OF LITIGATION, Issue 3 2009
Russ Bleemer
A rundown of the CPR Institute 25th Annual Awards for Excellence in ADR, including excerpts, as well as registration details for next month's Chicago E-Discovery CLE training event; the release of new CPR franchise and drafting guidance, and highlights from the keynote address at CPR's Annual Meeting. [source]


Ends that make a difference: Boldly creating the future

BOARD LEADERSHIP: POLICY GOVERNANCE IN ACTION, Issue 81 2005
John Carver
John Carver urges boards to leap beyond the simple matter of whether this or that is really an ends issue and move on to the real challenge: to set ever higher ends expectations. Boards spend far too much time fussing with the ends concept rather than using it. One of Carver's reasons for constructing the Policy Governance model was to enable boards powerfully and unrelentingly to impel managerial performance. The preliminary requirement for that is to focus on the right things free of the clutter which the ends-means concept enables. But for boards to demand doable but increasingly extraordinary performance requires that they add the human elements of farsightedness, daring, and leadership. The following is an adaptation of Carver's keynote address to the annual con-ference of the International Policy Governance Association in Phoenix, June 3, 2005. [source]


The Disappearance of Disability?

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPECIAL EDUCATION, Issue 4 2002
Thoughts on a Changing Culture
Gilbert MacKay was appointed professor of special education at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow in September 2000. With a background in teaching and educational psychology, Professor MacKay has research interests in early communication and people with intellectual disabilities. Recently, the Scottish Executive awarded him grants totalling 250,000 for the development of a service for young children with autism and for the professional education of experienced teachers in developmental difficulties such as dyspraxia. This paper, originally given as a keynote address at the Scottish NASEN conference in Glasgow, challenges many of the prevailing trends in relation to disability and special educational needs. Taking a broad view of developments since Warnock, and providing a fascinating insight into recent initiatives in Scotland, Gilbert MacKay offers an analysis of five ways in which the notion of disability, and the practical reality of our responses to it, are being unhelpfully removed from the educational arena. While we can all strive to promote forms of inclusion that encompass ever,widening parameters of diversity, no one's interests are served if the implications of individuals' difficulties are simply ignored or wished away. Gilbert MacKay highlights the dangers in some recent trends but also points the way towards a much more responsive and productive future. [source]


Cultural Diversity: Reflections of the First Asian-Pacific Regional Congress of IASSID

JOURNAL OF POLICY AND PRACTICE IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, Issue 3-4 2005
Kuo-yu Wang
Abstract, The author makes the point that there were two aims for considering cultural and social aspects with respect to the extant research on inellectual disabilities. The first is to compare how different societies perceive the value of life for people with intellectual disabilities and to recognize the presence of basic societal traditional values. The second is to raise the awareness and perception of the differences evident in various societies' policies toward their populations of persons with intellectual disabilities and to focus on the reality of daily life for people with intellectual disabilities. These two facets, cultural diversity and national social aspects, were foundational to the structure of the 2005 Asia-Pacific IASSID conference program, both by how these themes were integrated into the keynote addresses and focal presentations, and how they were promoted through the social program and delegate activities. Within this context, the author describes how these themes, addressed at the conference, could be used to help develop a better understanding of how cultural differences affect research. [source]