Khanka Massif (khanka + massif)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


SHRIMP zircon and EPMA monazite dating of granitic rocks from the Maizuru terrane, southwest Japan: Correlation with East Asian Paleozoic terranes and geological implications

ISLAND ARC, Issue 3 2008
Masahiro Fujii
Abstract The Maizuru terrane, distributed in the Inner Zone of southwest Japan, is divided into three subzones (Northern, Central and Southern), each with distinct lithological associations. In clear contrast with the Southern zone consisting of the Yakuno ophiolite, the Northern zone is subdivided into the western and eastern bodies by a high-angle fault, recognized mainly by the presence of deformed granitic rocks and pelitic gneiss. This association suggests an affinity with a mature continental block; this is supported by the mode of occurrence, and petrological and isotopic data. Newly obtained sensitive high mass-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U,Pb ages reveal the intrusion ages of 424 16 and 405 18 Ma (Siluro,Devonian) for the granites from the western body, and 249 10 and 243 19 Ma (Permo,Triassic) for the granodiorites from the eastern body. The granites in the western body also show inherited zircon ages of around 580 and 765 Ma. In addition, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) monazite U,Th,total Pb dating gives around 475,460 Ma. The age of intrusion, inherited ages, mode of occurrence, and geological setting of the Siluro,Devonian granites of the Northern zone all show similarities with those of the Khanka Massif, southern Primoye, Russia, and the Hikami granitic rocks of the South Kitakami terrane, Northeast Japan. We propose that both the Siluro,Devonian and Permo,Triassic granitic rocks of the Northern zone are likely to have been juxtaposed through the Triassic,Late Jurassic dextral strike-slip movement, and to have originated from the Khanka Massif and the Hida terrane, respectively. This study strongly supports the importance of the strike-slip movement as a mechanism causing the structural rearrangement of the Paleozoic,Mesozoic terranes in the Japanese Islands, as well as in East Asia. [source]


Zircon U,Pb ages and tectonic implications of ,Early Paleozoic' granitoids at Yanbian, Jilin Province, northeast China

ISLAND ARC, Issue 4 2004
Yanbin Zhang
Abstract The Yanbian area is located in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) of China and is characterized by widespread Phanerozoic granitic intrusions. It was previously thought that the Yanbian granitoids were mainly emplaced in the Early Paleozoic (so-called ,Caledonian' granitoids), extending east,west along the northern margin of the North China craton. However, few of them have been precisely dated; therefore, five typical ,Caledonian' granitic intrusions (the Huangniling, Dakai, Mengshan, Gaoling and Bailiping batholiths) were selected for U,Pb zircon isotopic study. New-age data show that emplacement of these granitoids extended from the Late Paleozoic to Late Mesozoic (285,116 Ma). This indicates that no ,Caledonian' granitic belt exists along the northern margin of the North China craton. The granitoids can be subdivided into four episodes based on our new data: Early Permian (285 9 Ma), Early Triassic (249,245 Ma), Jurassic (192,168 Ma) and Cretaceous (119,116 Ma). The 285 9 Ma tonalite was most likely related to subduction of the Paleo-Asian Oceanic Plate beneath the North China craton, followed by Triassic (249,245 Ma) syn-collisional monzogranites, representing the collision of the CAOB orogenic collage with the North China craton and final closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. The Jurassic granitoids resulted from subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate and subsequent collision of the Jiamusi,Khanka Massif with the existing continent, assembled in the Triassic. The Early Cretaceous granitoids formed in an extensional setting along the eastern Asian continental margin. [source]


Fluorite Deposits at Voznesenka in the Khanka Massif, Russia: Geology and Age of Mineralization

RESOURCE GEOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
Kohei Sato
Abstract. A huge fluorite deposit at Voznesenka in the Khanka massif, Far East Russia is concluded to have formed at ca. 450 Ma in Late Ordovician time based on the K-Ar ages for Li-micas in the fluorite ore and greisenized leucogranite within the deposit. This conclusion is inconsistent with the current view of Devonian mineralization that stemmed from widely scattered whole-rock Rb-Sr isotope data for the heterogeneous leucogranite stocks influenced by strong alteration. The Voznesenka and neighboring fluorite deposits may have formed in Cambrian limestone in relation to the intrusion of the Li-F-rich felsic magma which has a similar chemistry to representative Li-F-rich felsic rocks including topaz granite and ongonite or topaz rhyolite; these rocks may be classified as a specific group of highly fractionated felsic magmas. Biotite granite plutons exposed in the Voznesenka district are divided in age into two groups based on the CHIME age data for zircon, monazite and xenotime: Ordovician and Permian. The Ordovician plutons seem to be coeval to the fluorite deposits and are characterized by F-rich chemistry, reduced nature and association of tin mineralization with the deposition of fluorite and tourmaline. The biotite granite magmas of initially enhanced F contents could have been highly fractionated to form Li-F-rich leucogranite cupolas that provided fluorite deposits within the host limestone. Future prospecting for similar fluorite deposits is to be focused on areas of intersection between Ordovician Li-F-rich granite and Cambrian carbonate sequences. The Permian granite of southeastern margin of the Grodekovo batholith is characterized by lesser F content, oxidized nature and the lack of tin and fluorite mineralization in contrast to the Ordovician granite. The result of Permian age does not support the current view of Silurian age for the batholith and requires overall chronological reinvestigation in connection with the tectonic history of the Khanka massif because the Grodekovo is a representative of Paleozoic batholiths in Primorie. [source]


Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic exhumation of the Yanji area, northeast China: Constraints from fission-track thermochronology

ISLAND ARC, Issue 1 2010
Xiaoming Li
Abstract The Yanji area, located at the border of China, Russia, and Korea, where the Phanerozoic granitoids have been widely exposed, was considered part of the orogenic collage between the North China Block in the south and the Jiamusi,Khanka Massifs in the northeast. In this study, the cooling and inferred uplift and denudation history since the late Mesozoic are intensively studied by carrying out apatite and zircon fission-track analyses, together with electron microprobe analyses (EMPA) of chemical compositions of apatite from the granitoid samples in the Yanji area. The results show that: (i) zircon and apatite fission-track ages range 91.7,99.6 Ma and 76.5,85.4 Ma, respectively; (ii) all apatite fission-track length distributions are unimodal and yield mean lengths of 12,13.2 m, and the apatites are attributed to chlorine-bearing fluorapatite as revealed by EMPA results; and (iii) the thermal history modeling results based on apatite fission-track grain ages and length distributions indicate that the time,temperature paths display similar patterns and the cooling has been accelerated for each sample since ca 15 Ma. Thus, we conclude that sequential cooling, involving two rapid (95,80 Ma and ca 15,0 Ma) and one slow (80,15 Ma) cooling, has taken place through the exhumation of the Yanji area since the late Cretaceous. The maximum exhumation is more than 5 km under a steady-state geothermal gradient of 35C/km. Combined with the tectonic setting, this exhumation is possibly related to the subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate since the late Cretaceous. [source]


Fluorite Deposits at Voznesenka in the Khanka Massif, Russia: Geology and Age of Mineralization

RESOURCE GEOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
Kohei Sato
Abstract. A huge fluorite deposit at Voznesenka in the Khanka massif, Far East Russia is concluded to have formed at ca. 450 Ma in Late Ordovician time based on the K-Ar ages for Li-micas in the fluorite ore and greisenized leucogranite within the deposit. This conclusion is inconsistent with the current view of Devonian mineralization that stemmed from widely scattered whole-rock Rb-Sr isotope data for the heterogeneous leucogranite stocks influenced by strong alteration. The Voznesenka and neighboring fluorite deposits may have formed in Cambrian limestone in relation to the intrusion of the Li-F-rich felsic magma which has a similar chemistry to representative Li-F-rich felsic rocks including topaz granite and ongonite or topaz rhyolite; these rocks may be classified as a specific group of highly fractionated felsic magmas. Biotite granite plutons exposed in the Voznesenka district are divided in age into two groups based on the CHIME age data for zircon, monazite and xenotime: Ordovician and Permian. The Ordovician plutons seem to be coeval to the fluorite deposits and are characterized by F-rich chemistry, reduced nature and association of tin mineralization with the deposition of fluorite and tourmaline. The biotite granite magmas of initially enhanced F contents could have been highly fractionated to form Li-F-rich leucogranite cupolas that provided fluorite deposits within the host limestone. Future prospecting for similar fluorite deposits is to be focused on areas of intersection between Ordovician Li-F-rich granite and Cambrian carbonate sequences. The Permian granite of southeastern margin of the Grodekovo batholith is characterized by lesser F content, oxidized nature and the lack of tin and fluorite mineralization in contrast to the Ordovician granite. The result of Permian age does not support the current view of Silurian age for the batholith and requires overall chronological reinvestigation in connection with the tectonic history of the Khanka massif because the Grodekovo is a representative of Paleozoic batholiths in Primorie. [source]