Intraindividual Variations (intraindividual + variation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


ADAPTATION AND INTRAINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN SALES OUTCOMES: EXPLORING THE INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF PERSONALITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL OPPORTUNITY

PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2006
GREG L. STEWART
Many practices in the field of industrial-organizational psychology assume that individual performance is stable across time; yet, little is actually known about the extent to which performance varies within individuals. We specifically address this issue by exploring the longitudinal influence of a situational opportunity (referrals received from the central office) on intraindividual performance outcomes of sales representatives. We also explore Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience as traits that explain variation in adaptation to changes in referrals. Our results show that more weekly variation in individual performance resides within individuals than between individuals. A majority of this variance is explained by the situational opportunity of referrals. Furthermore, the positive relationship between referrals and outcomes is stronger for sales representatives high on Conscientiousness, but weaker for representatives high on Openness to Experience. [source]


Intraindividual variation of the International Normalized Ratio in patients monitored with a recombinant human thromboplastin

JOURNAL OF THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, Issue 7 2010
J. H. H. VAN GEEST-DAALDEROP
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Early recognition of newborn goat kids by their mother: II.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOBIOLOGY, Issue 4 2003
Auditory recognition, evidence of an individual acoustic signature in the neonate
Abstract The vocal recognition of newborn kids by their mother at 2 days postpartum and the possible existence of interindividual differences in the voice structure of newborn kids were investigated in two separate studies. The ability of goats to discriminate between the bleats of their own versus an alien kid was tested at 2 days postpartum in mothers being prevented access to visual and olfactory cues from the young. Goats spent significantly more time on the side of the enclosure from which their own kid was bleating, looked in its direction for longer, and responded more frequently to the bleats of their own than to those of the alien kid (p,<,0.05). In the second study, the sonograms of 13 kids, studied from Days 1 to 5, showed significant interindividual differences for the five variables taken into account and on each of the 5 days (duration of bleat, fundamental frequency, peak frequency, and numbers of segments and of harmonics). The potential for individual coding ranged between 1.1 and 4.1, indicating that for some variables variations between individuals were greater than intraindividual variations. Furthermore, when considering the five parameters together, the discriminating scores showed an average of 95% in the 78 combinations of any 2 kids for any given day. Finally, some significant intraindividual differences also were found between days, suggesting ontogenic changes in the characteristics of the kid's voice in early life. Therefore, mother goats are likely to recognize the vocalizations of their 48-hr-old kids, as they show sufficient interindividual variability to allow the existence of individual vocal signatures, even though some of the characteristics of the bleats change rapidly over time. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 43: 311,320, 2003. [source]


Bone Mineral Content per Muscle Cross-Sectional Area as an Index of the Functional Muscle-Bone Unit,

JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH, Issue 6 2002
Eckhard Schoenau M.D.
Abstract Bone densitometric data often are difficult to interpret in children and adolescents because of large inter- and intraindividual variations in bone size. Here, we propose a functional approach to bone densitometry that addresses two questions: Is bone strength normally adapted to the largest physiological loads, that is, muscle force? Is muscle force adequate for body size? To implement this approach, forearm muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and bone mineral content (BMC) of the radial diaphysis were measured in 349 healthy subjects from 6 to 19 years of age (183 girls), using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Reference data were established for height-dependent muscle CSA and for the variation with age in the BMC/muscle CSA ratio. These reference data were used to evaluate results from three pediatric patient groups: children who had sustained multiple fractures without adequate trauma (n = 11), children with preterminal chronic renal failure (n = 11), and renal transplant recipients (n = 15). In all three groups mean height, muscle CSA, and BMC were low for age, but muscle CSA was normal for height. In the multiple fracture group and in renal transplant recipients the BMC/muscle CSA ratio was decreased (p < 0.05), suggesting that bone strength was not adapted adequately to muscle force. In contrast, chronic renal failure patients had a normal BMC/muscle CSA ratio, suggesting that their musculoskeletal system was adapted normally to their (decreased) body size. This functional approach to pediatric bone densitometric data should be adaptable to a variety of densitometric techniques. [source]