Intra-arterial Thrombolysis (intra-arterial + thrombolysi)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion in United States: Nationwide In-Patient Survey 2001-2003

JOURNAL OF NEUROIMAGING, Issue 4 2007
M. Fareed K. Suri MD
ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT) has been used as a treatment modality for central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). However, national estimates of such practice and associated outcomes are not available. We performed this study to determine the frequency and outcomes of thrombolysis among adult patients hospitalized in United States (US) for CRAO. METHODS We determined the rates, hospital outcomes, and hospital charges incurred for patients with CRAO treated with thrombolysis using Nationwide Inpatient Survey (NIS) and compared them with patients treated without thrombolysis. NIS is the largest all-payer inpatient care database in the US approximating a 20-percent stratified sample of US community hospitals. RESULTS There were 1379 admissions for primary diagnosis of CRAO in 2001-2003. IAT was used in 27(1.9%) of the patients with CRAO. There was no in-hospital mortality or intracranial hemorrhage reported among any patient with CRAO treated with thrombolysis. All patients treated with IAT were discharged home. IAT was exclusively used in urbanteaching hospitals. CONCLUSIONS There is potential of benefit from IAT in CRAO, which is only offered in certain centers. Clinical trials are needed to demonstrate this beneficial effect. [source]


Rescue angioplasty after failed intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute middle cerebral artery stroke: A case report

CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Issue 3 2004
Pinky Agarwal MD
Abstract Intra-arterial thrombolysis is increasingly being used in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke with a failure rate of recanalization as high as 66%. We describe a case of acute ischemic stroke secondary to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery that failed intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy but responded to rescue balloon angioplasty. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2004;62:396,400. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Novel intra-arterial strategies in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 3 2008
PP Ng
Summary Acute ischaemic stroke is among the leading causes of death and disability in developed societies. I.v. and intra-arterial thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy carried out within the appropriate time window can result in superior clinical outcomes compared with traditional therapy consisting of anticoagulation and/or aspirin. In cases where thrombolysis and/or thrombectomy have not been proven effective or have failed to result in rapid clinical and/or angiographic improvement, novel intra-arterial strategies may be applied by experienced interventional neuroradiologists to achieve recanalization of recalcitrant vessel occlusions with good clinical outcomes. [source]


MANAGEMENT OF POPLITEAL ARTERY ANEURYSMS

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 10 2006
Maher Hamish
Background: Popliteal artery aneurysms (PAA) are the most common peripheral aneurysm and are recognized as ,the silent killer of the leg circulation'. The timing and type of interventions used in their treatment is still controversial. This review examines the published data on the natural history, epidemiology, clinical presentation and management options available. The aim of this study is to try and reach a consensus with regards to the best management of PAA. Method: A systematic review of data in the English published works since 1980. Results: The authors include 53 studies containing 2854 patients with 4291 PAA. Most published data involves retrospective studies and personal experience, with one multicentre study. No randomized controlled studies exist regarding the management of PAA. Conclusions: 1. Although most PAA are of atherosclerotic origin in old patients, trauma, infection and family history are the main causes in young patients. 2. Great vigilance is needed for diagnosis as only approximately five patients are seen each year by a major vascular centre. There is no place for screening programmes to detect PAA. 3. Approximately 45% of patients are asymptomatic at the time of initial diagnosis. Aortic aneurysms are found in 40% and bilateral PAA in 50% of patients. More than 95% of patients are men with a mean age of 65 years and 45% have hypertension. 4. Surgical reconstruction is recommended for all symptomatic and asymptomatic aneurysms larger than 2 cm. Five-year graft patency rates after surgical repair range from 30 to 97%, with 5-year limb salvage ranging from 70 to 98%. Patient survival rates at 5 and 10 years are 75 and 46%, respectively. 5. If carried out carefully, intra-arterial thrombolysis can safely prepare patients presenting with acute ischaemia from occluded PAA, for surgical revascularization to restore distal run-off. 6. Endovascular repair of a PAA is a feasible option, although little evidence is yet available. 7. Lifelong, careful patient surveillance is essential to detect and treat new aneurysms at other sites. [source]


Rescue angioplasty after failed intra-arterial thrombolysis in acute middle cerebral artery stroke: A case report

CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Issue 3 2004
Pinky Agarwal MD
Abstract Intra-arterial thrombolysis is increasingly being used in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke with a failure rate of recanalization as high as 66%. We describe a case of acute ischemic stroke secondary to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery that failed intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy but responded to rescue balloon angioplasty. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2004;62:396,400. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]