Intra-abdominal Abscess (intra-abdominal + abscess)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences


Selected Abstracts


THERAPEUTIC FISTULOSCOPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PROLONGED POSTOPERATIVE INTRA-ABDOMINAL ABSCESS CAUSED BY SMALL INTESTINAL PINHOLE PERFORATION

DIGESTIVE ENDOSCOPY, Issue 4 2005
Yoshihisa Saida
Fistuloscopy is an effective treatment for intractable fistula, a sometimes difficult to manage postoperative intra-abdominal complication. A case of a 69-year-old male with an abdominal abscess after he underwent right hemi-colectomy for cecum cancer with invasions into the ileum and sigmoid colon is reported. A re-operation for lavage and drainage was performed 2 weeks after surgery. However, no obvious origin for the pus was located. Although physiological saline lavage was repeatedly performed, the effusion of pus persisted in the drain at the midline incision about 7 months after surgery. Then, fistuloscopy with an upper gastrointestinal endoscope was performed through the hole of the tube. A pinhole that produced a bubble just below the midline incision was observed. Then, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) tube was inserted to obtain images of the small intestine by fluorography and findings suggested a diagnosis of perforation of the small intestine, which appeared to explain why resolution of the abscess was prolonged. After direct drainage to the small intestine with a 40-cm-long 7 Fr percutaneous transhepatic cholangio drainage (PTCD) balloon catheter, pus from the tube notably decreased. After confirming that the abscess cavity had disappeared by abdominal computed tomography scan, the PTCD catheter was extracted about 8 months after primary surgery. Since then, no recurrence of cancer or abscess has been observed. In cases of intractable postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, fistuloscopy using smaller diameter gastrointestinal endoscopy appears to be a valuable diagnostic tool. [source]


Intra-abdominal abscess in a patient with tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, Issue 2 2006
S. STJERNBERG-SALMELA
Abstract. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by periodic attacks of fever and inflammation, due to mutations in the gene coding for the TNF type I receptor (TNFRSF1A). A 16-year-old patient with the diagnosis of TRAPS was admitted to hospital because of fever and abdominal pain. Initially, the symptoms were interpreted as manifestations of another TRAPS attack, but the patient's condition worsened, despite treatment with corticosteroids and antibiotics. A repeated computer tomography revealed an intra-abdominal abscess, which necessitated urgent surgical intervention. This case stresses the importance of differential diagnostic vigilance when dealing with patients with rare genetic diseases. [source]


THERAPEUTIC FISTULOSCOPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PROLONGED POSTOPERATIVE INTRA-ABDOMINAL ABSCESS CAUSED BY SMALL INTESTINAL PINHOLE PERFORATION

DIGESTIVE ENDOSCOPY, Issue 4 2005
Yoshihisa Saida
Fistuloscopy is an effective treatment for intractable fistula, a sometimes difficult to manage postoperative intra-abdominal complication. A case of a 69-year-old male with an abdominal abscess after he underwent right hemi-colectomy for cecum cancer with invasions into the ileum and sigmoid colon is reported. A re-operation for lavage and drainage was performed 2 weeks after surgery. However, no obvious origin for the pus was located. Although physiological saline lavage was repeatedly performed, the effusion of pus persisted in the drain at the midline incision about 7 months after surgery. Then, fistuloscopy with an upper gastrointestinal endoscope was performed through the hole of the tube. A pinhole that produced a bubble just below the midline incision was observed. Then, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) tube was inserted to obtain images of the small intestine by fluorography and findings suggested a diagnosis of perforation of the small intestine, which appeared to explain why resolution of the abscess was prolonged. After direct drainage to the small intestine with a 40-cm-long 7 Fr percutaneous transhepatic cholangio drainage (PTCD) balloon catheter, pus from the tube notably decreased. After confirming that the abscess cavity had disappeared by abdominal computed tomography scan, the PTCD catheter was extracted about 8 months after primary surgery. Since then, no recurrence of cancer or abscess has been observed. In cases of intractable postoperative intra-abdominal abscess, fistuloscopy using smaller diameter gastrointestinal endoscopy appears to be a valuable diagnostic tool. [source]


Extraintestinal manifestations of Edwardsiella tarda infection

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 8 2005
I-K Wang
Summary Edwardsiella tarda, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, is a rare human pathogen. Gastroenteritis is the most frequently reported manifestation of E. tarda infection. In contrast, extraintestinal infection with E. tarda has rarely been reported. This study made a retrospective case and microbiological data review of patients with extraintestinal E. tarda infections to further understand this disease. This study retrospectively reviewed the charts of all isolates of E. tarda cultures from clinical specimens other than faeces at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan from October 1998 through December 2001. Edwardsiella tarda was isolated from 22 clinical specimens from 22 hospitalised patients (13 females and nine males). The extraintestinal manifestations of E. tarda infection included biliary tract infection, bacteraemia, skin and soft tissue infection, liver abscess, peritonitis, intra-abdominal abscess, and tubo-ovarian abscess. The major underlying diseases predisposing to E. tarda extraintestinal infection were hepatobiliary diseases, malignancy and diabetes mellitus. The overall mortality rate of E. tarda extraintestinal infection in the present series was 22.7% (5/22), and four (40%) of 10 patients with bacteraemia expired. Although rare, human E. tarda extraintestinal infections can have diverse clinical manifestations and moreover may cause severe and life-threatening infections. Consequently, E. tarda should be considered a potentially important pathogen. [source]


Intra-abdominal abscess in a patient with tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, Issue 2 2006
S. STJERNBERG-SALMELA
Abstract. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by periodic attacks of fever and inflammation, due to mutations in the gene coding for the TNF type I receptor (TNFRSF1A). A 16-year-old patient with the diagnosis of TRAPS was admitted to hospital because of fever and abdominal pain. Initially, the symptoms were interpreted as manifestations of another TRAPS attack, but the patient's condition worsened, despite treatment with corticosteroids and antibiotics. A repeated computer tomography revealed an intra-abdominal abscess, which necessitated urgent surgical intervention. This case stresses the importance of differential diagnostic vigilance when dealing with patients with rare genetic diseases. [source]


Laparoscopic resection with transcolonic specimen extraction for ileocaecal Crohn's disease,

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 4 2010
E. J. Eshuis
Background: Ileocolic resection for Crohn's disease can be performed entirely laparoscopically. However, an incision is needed for specimen extraction. This prospective observational study assessed the feasibility of endoscopic transcolonic specimen removal. Methods: Endoscopic specimen removal was attempted in a consecutive series of ten patients scheduled for laparoscopic ileocolic resection. Primary outcomes were feasibility, operating time, reoperation rate, pain scores, morphine requirement and hospital stay. To assess applicability, outcomes were compared with previous data from patients who had laparoscopically assisted operations. Results: Transcolonic removal was successful in eight of ten patients; it was considered not feasible in two patients because the inflammatory mass was too large (7,8 cm). Median operating time was 208 min and median postoperative hospital stay was 5 days. After surgery two patients developed an intra-abdominal abscess, drained laparoscopically or percutaneously, and one patient had another site-specific infection. The operation took longer than conventional laparoscopy, with no benefits perceived by patients in terms of cosmesis or body image. Conclusion: Transcolonic removal of the specimen in ileocolic Crohn's disease is feasible in the absence of a large inflammatory mass but infection may be a problem. It is unclear whether the technique offers benefit compared with conventional laparoscopic surgery. Copyright 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Identification of risk factors for the development of complications following extended and superextended lymphadenectomies for gastric cancer

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 9 2005
Y. Kodera
Background: Extended lymphadenectomy for gastric carcinoma has been associated with high mortality and morbidity rates in several multicentre randomized trials. Methods: Using data from 523 patients registered for a prospective randomized trial comparing extended (D2) and superextended (D3) lymphadenectomies, risk factors for overall complications and major surgical complications (anastomotic leakage, intra-abdominal abscess and pancreatic fistula) were identified by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Mortality and morbidity rates were 08 per cent (four of 523) and 245 per cent (128 of 523) respectively. Pancreatectomy (relative risk 562 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 194 to 1627)) and prolonged operating time (relative risk 265 (95 per cent confidence interval 134 to 523)) were the most important risk factors for overall complications. A body mass index of 25 kg/m2 or above, pancreatectomy and age greater than 65 years were significant predictors of major surgical complications. Conclusion: Pancreatectomy should be reserved for patients with stage T4 disease. Age and obesity should be considered when planning surgery. Copyright 2005 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Experience of pancreaticoduodenectomy in a district general hospital

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 3 2000
K. Akhtar
Aims: Long-term survival after surgery for pancreatic cancer remains very low and it is particularly important that minimal surgery-related morbidity and mortality rates are achieved. It has been stated that centres performing small numbers of proximal pancreaticoduodenectomies are likely to have high morbidity and mortality rates. The results of pancreatic surgery in a district general hospital are reported. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of all pancreaticoduodenectomies over 4 years. Results: Twenty-one selected patients underwent proximal pancreaticoduodenectomy and two patients total pancreatectomy over a 4-year period from 1995 to 1999. The operations were performed by two surgeons with a special interest in upper gastrointestinal surgery. The median age was 62 (38,83) years. There were 14 men and nine women. Fifteen patients had adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas, five had ampullary carcinoma, one duodenal carcinoma and there was one case of chronic pancreatitis. Six patients had pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and 15 had a standard Whipple procedure. The median stay in hospital was 20 (13,26) days. Two patients had a pancreatic leak, one of whom developed an intra-abdominal abscess which was treated successfully by percutaneous drainage. Six patients experienced delayed gastric emptying, two of whom had PPPD. Both the 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates were zero. The median number of lymph nodes dissected was 12 and in 11 patients no nodal metastasis was found. Conclusions: It is possible to perform pancreatic surgery in a district general hospital and achieve results that are comparable to those of specialist centres. 2000 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd [source]


Categorization of major and minor complications in the treatment of patients with resectable rectal cancer using short-term pre-operative radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Delphi round

COLORECTAL DISEASE, Issue 4 2006
R. Bakx
Abstract Background, To properly balance the benefit (reduction of local recurrence) of short-term pre-operative radiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer against its harm (complications), a consensus concerning the severity of complications is required. The aim of this study was to reach consensus regarding major and minor complications after short-term radiotherapy followed by total mesorectal excision in the treatment of rectal carcinoma, using the Delphi technique. Methods, A Delphi round was performed in cooperation with 21 colo-rectal surgeons from the Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden. The key-question was: ,Which of the predefined complications, caused or substantially aggravated by radiotherapy, are so important (major) that they might lead to the decision to abandon short-term pre-operative radiotherapy (5 5Gy) when treating patients with resectable rectal cancer (T1,3N0,2M0)?' Results, After three rounds, consensus was reached for 37 (68%) of 54 complications of which 13 were considered major and 24 considered minor. The following complications were considered to be major: mortality, anastomotic leakage managed by relaparotomy, anastomotic leakage resulting in persisting fistula, postoperative haemorrhage managed by relaparotomy, intra-abdominal abscess without healing tendency, sepsis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, compartment syndrome of the lower legs, long-term incontinence for solid stool, long-term problems with voiding, pelvic fracture with persisting pain, and neuropathy with persisting pain (legs). Three of 17 complications without consensus showed a tendency to be considered as major: perineal wound dehiscence managed by surgical treatment, small bowel obstruction leading to relaparotomy and long-term incontinence for liquid stool. Conclusion, The 13 major and three ,accepted as major' complications can be used to properly balance the benefit and harm of short-term pre-operative radiotherapy in resectable rectal cancer. This may eventually lead to improved treatment strategies for these patients. [source]


Multiple synchronous colonic anastomoses: are they safe?

COLORECTAL DISEASE, Issue 2 2010
S. D. Holubar
Abstract Objective, To evaluate short-term outcomes after construction of synchronous colonic anastomoses without fecal diversion. Method, Using a prospective procedural database, all adult general surgery patients who underwent two synchronous segmental colon resections and anastomoses without ostomy at our institution from 1992,2007 were identified. Demographics, operative techniques, and 30-day outcomes are reported. Results are number (percent) of patients or median (interquartile range). Results, Over 15 years, 69 patients underwent double colonic anastomoses [40 males, age 63 (45,76) years, BMI 25.3 (22.9,28.7) kg/m2]. Multiple colonic anastomoses were performed in one of every 201 colectomies during the study period (0.5%). The operation was an emergency in two (3%) cases; most cases were clean-contaminated 56 (81%). Ten (17%) cases were laparoscopic-assisted with a 44% conversion rate. Length of stay was seven (5,10) days. Overall 30-day morbidity was 36% including nine (13%) surgical site infections, two (2.9%) intra-abdominal abscesses requiring percutaneous drainage, and one (1.4%) wound dehiscence. There were no anastomotic leaks or fistulas, and two patients (2.9%) died within 30 days from pulmonary sepsis and complications from a distal anastomotic hemorrhage, respectively. Conclusions, Synchronous colon anastomoses without fecal diversion do not appear to be associated with an increased risk of complications and can be safely constructed in selected patients. [source]