Intestinal Submucosa (intestinal + submucosa)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Intestinal Submucosa

  • porcine small intestinal submucosa
  • small intestinal submucosa


  • Selected Abstracts


    USE OF PORCINE SMALL INTESTINAL SUBMUCOSA IN BLADDER AUGMENTATION IN RABBIT: LONG-TERM HISTOLOGICAL OUTCOME

    ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 1-2 2008
    Ali Ayyildiz
    Aim: To investigate long-term histological features of bladder augmentation using porcine small intestine submucosa (SIS) in a rabbit model. Materials and method: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were used. Porcine SIS was provided by a manufactured formation derived from the pig. After partial cystectomy was carried out on the bladder, a single layer of SIS (Cook® -SIS Technology, Cook Biotech Incorporated, West Lafayette, IN, USA) (2 × 5 cm) was sewn to bladder with continuous 5/0 vicryl suture material in a watertight manner. Urinary diversion was not used. The rabbits were killed 12 months later and perivesical fat was removed together with bladder. The 5-,m preparations taken from the samples were stained with haematoxylin,eosin and Mason's trichrome dye. S-100 and F8 stains were also used for immunohistochemical investigations. Results: The macroscopic view of bladder was normal. SIS was indistinguishable from normal bladder wall, but the region of the graft had a slight white coloration. Microscopic observations showed the continuity of transitional epithelium of host bladder tissue on SIS material. Detrusor and serosal layers were formed and these layers were indistinguishable from host bladder. Fibroblasts were scattered among the collagen fibrils. New vessel formations were present without lymphatic proliferation. Nerve regeneration was excellent. No inflammation was observed in normal and regenerated bladder wall. Conclusion: At the end of 12 months, the long-term histological features of bladder augmentation with porcine SIS in a rabbit model, such as presence of new vessel formations, nerve regeneration, collagen and smooth muscle regenerations, which were indistinguishable from original bladder, and the absence of inflammation, showed that SIS seems to be a viable alternative to the use of intestine in bladder augmentation. [source]


    Unsuccessful Alloplastic Esophageal Replacement With Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa

    ARTIFICIAL ORGANS, Issue 4 2009
    Thorsten Doede
    Abstract:, In general, there is no perfect method for esophageal replacement under consideration of the numerous associated risks and complications. The aim of this study was to examine a new material,small intestinal submucosa (SIS),in alloplastic esophageal replacement. We implanted tubular SIS prosthesis about 4 cm in length in the cervical esophagus of 14 piglets (weight 9,13 kg). For the first 10 days, the animals were fed parenterally, supplemented by free given water, followed by an oral feeding phase. Four weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed. Only 1 of the 14 animals survived the study period of 4 weeks. The other piglets had to be sacrificed prematurely because of severe esophageal stenosis. On postmortem exploration, the prosthesis could not be found either macroscopically or histologically. Sutures between the prosthesis and the cervical muscles did not improve the results. Until now, the use of alloplastic materials in esophageal replacement has failed irrespective of the kind of material. As well as in our experiments, severe stenosis had been reported in several animal studies. The reasons for this unacceptable high rate of stenosis after alloplastic esophageal replacement seem to be multifactorial. Possible solutions could be transanastomotic splints, less inert materials, the decrease of anastomotic tension by stay sutures, the use of adult stem cells, and tissue engineering. [source]


    Dorsal onlay augmentation urethroplasty with small intestinal submucosa: Modified Barbagli technique for strictures of the bulbar urethra

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, Issue 11 2006
    IVO I DONKOV
    Aim: To present the results from one clinic's experience of using small intestinal submucosa (SIS) in augmentation urethroplasty for management of strictures of the bulbar urethra. Methods: Urethral surgery was performed in nine men with strictures 4,6 cm. All of the patients were evaluated by history, physical examination, retrograde urethrogram, and uroflowmetry. Four layers of SIS were soaked in saline or Ringer's solution for 15 minutes at 37°C, and the inner surface of the patch was gently fenestrated with a thin scalpel. The patch was spread-fixed onto the tunica albuginea. The mucosa was sutured to the submucosal graft first at 2,3 mm inwards from the SIS margins, then the spongiosum tissue was attached to the margins with interrupted absorbable sutures. Results: Of the nine patients who underwent augmentation urethroplasty using SIS, only one had re-stricture at 6 months due to urethral infection. At 18 months after the surgery the uroflowmetry of the other eight patients was 20,21 mL/s. In terms of complications, six patients reported having post-micturition dribbling, and seven patients reported lack of morning erections for 35,69 days after surgery. Conclusions: Using SIS is a safe procedure; however, long-term follow-up is needed to substantiate the good short-term results. [source]


    Type and ultrastructure of Didymocystis wedli and Koellikerioides intestinalis (Digenea, Didymozoidae) cysts in captive Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus Linnaeus, 1758)

    JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY, Issue 6 2009
    I. Mladineo
    Summary Tissue encapsulation, one of the most common tissue reactions to invading parasites, is the hallmark sign of didymozoid (Digenea, Didymozoidae) infections in fish. Investigated were the types of intermediate filaments and ultrastructure of the connective tissue capsule elicited by the presence of didymozoids in the gills and intestine of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus Linnaeus, 1758). The evaluation was done performing TEM microscopy of two tissue-embedded didymozoid species, along with monoclonal antibodies labeling (anti-fish collagen type I, anti-human cytokeratin, anti-vimentin antibodies). Ultrastructure of Didymocystis wedli (Ariola, 1902) (prevalence = 61.75%, abundance = 28.91) encapsulated in gill filaments and Koellikerioides intestinalis (Yamaguti, 1970) (prevalence = 54.65%, abundance = 10.96) in the intestinal submucosa showed that the thin parasitic hindbody tegumentum was directly embedded in layers of connective tissue bands. Only a few cellular elements (lymphocytes, fibroblasts and fibrocytes) infiltrated the connective tissue capsule, which differed between the two didymozoid species in thickness, not in the type of filaments expressed. Cysts showed positive reaction to extracellular collagen as well as appearing positive for the cytoskeletal intermediate filaments vimentin and cytokeratin. [source]


    Addition of nimesulide to small intestinal submucosa biomaterial inhibits postsurgical adhesiogenesis in rats

    JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS RESEARCH, Issue 1 2010
    Mark A. Suckow
    Abstract Adhesion formation is a common complication in abdominal surgery with incidence as high as 93% and small bowel obstruction a common complication. Because the extracellular matrix material, small intestinal submucosa (SIS), is commonly used in various surgical procedures, methods to inhibit adhesiogenesis are of great interest. This study was undertaken to determine if incorporation of nimesulide (NM), a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, could reduce the extent and tenacity of intraabdominal adhesion formation associated with SIS implantation. Female Sprague,Dawley rats underwent a cecal abrasion surgical procedure to induce adhesiogenesis. Rats were either left untreated or treated by direct application over the injured cecum with polypropylene mesh (PPM); SIS; SIS containing a low dose of NM; or SIS containing a high dose of NM. Rats were euthanized 21 days later, and adhesion extent and tenacity were evaluated using standard scales (0 = minimal adhesiogenesis; 4 = severe adhesiogenesis). Addition of NM to SIS resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in adhesion extent and in a similar reduction in adhesion tenacity for SIS containing a low dose of NM. Adhesions typically extended from the abraded cecal surface to the body wall and were characterized histologically by fibrous tissue adherent to the cecal wall. In conclusion, addition of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, COX-2 selective drug, NM, to SIS attenuates adhesion extent and tenacity when compared with surgical placement of SIS or PPM alone. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2010 [source]


    Use of a bioscaffold to improve healing of a patellar tendon defect after graft harvest for ACL reconstruction: A study in rabbits

    JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Issue 2 2008
    Sinan Karaoglu
    Abstract Following harvest of a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft, the central third of the patellar tendon (PT) does not heal well. The healing tissues also form adhesions to the fat pad and can cause abnormal patellofemoral joint motion. The hypotheses were that a bioscaffold could enhance patellar tendon healing through contact guidance and chemotaxis, and the scaffold could serve as a barrier to decrease adhesion formation between the neo-PT and infrapatellar fat pad. In 20 New Zealand White rabbits, a central-third PT defect was created. One strip of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was attached to both the anterior and posterior sides of the PT defect of the SIS-treated group (n,=,10). For comparison, a central defect was left nontreated (n,=,10). At 12 weeks, histomorphology was examined using Masson's trichrome staining. The cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined with a laser micrometer, and the central BPTB complexes were tested in uniaxial tension. SIS-treated samples showed a greater amount of healing tissue with denser and well-oriented collagen fibers and more spindle-shaped cells. There was no noticeable adhesion formation in the SIS-treated group. For the nontreated group, there were significantly more and diffuse adhesive formations. The SIS-treated group also had a 68% increase in neo-PT CSA, 98% higher stiffness, and 113% higher ultimate load than that in the nontreated group. SIS treatment increased the quantity of healing tissue, improved the histological appearance and biomechanical properties of the neo-PT, and prevented adhesion formation between the PT and fat pad. © 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 26:255,263, 2008 [source]


    Evaluation of a novel biomaterial for intrasubstance muscle laceration repair

    JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Issue 3 2007
    Bradley D. Crow
    Abstract The authors compare the effects of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) treatment to suture repair with respect to histologic and functional outcomes for complete muscle lacerations in a rabbit model. The authors hypothesized that SIS treatment of full-thickness muscle belly lacerations would significantly improve muscle function, strength, and regeneration compared to the current standard-of-care treatment. Muscle belly lacerations were created in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of both hind limbs of each rabbit. After randomization, lacerations were left unrepaired (n,=,48) or repaired using a 4-0 Prolene modified Kessler stitch (n,=,48). A flap of SIS graft was sutured into half (n,=,24 each) of the repaired and unrepaired muscles forming four study groups. Suture repair with SIS augmentation of complete muscle lacerations resulted in healed tissue that most closely resembled normal muscle in terms of morphology and function when compared to current standard-of-care treatments. Active force production in this group reached 79% of uninjured controls 12 weeks after surgery. SIS may have important clinical advantages over suture repair alone and warrants further clinical study. © 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 2007 [source]


    In vitro study comparing two collageneous membranes in view of their clinical application for rotator cuff tendon regeneration

    JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Issue 1 2007
    Milena Fini
    Abstract Tenocytes were isolated from the rotator cuff tendons of healthy (HT) and glucocorticoid (GC)-treated rats (GCT) and were cultured on polystyrene wells (TCP) as control, and on 2 de-cellularized collagen matrices: porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS), and human dermal matrix (Graftjacket®, GJ). At 3 and 7 days cell proliferation and synthesis were evaluated. Proliferation of HT tenocytes increased between experimental times for both tested membranes, but already at 3 days, HT tenocytes cultured on GJ showed the highest WST-1 value. The collagen-I (CICP) synthesis on GJ membrane did not change between experimental times and was significantly higher than TCP and SIS at 7 days. Proteoglycans (PG), and fibronectin (FBN) synthesis increased when HT were cultured on GJ, between experimental times, and both PG and FBN synthesis on GJ membrane were higher than TCP and SIS at 7 days. GC determined decreases in cell proliferation, CICP and PG syntheses at 3 days of culture on TCP when compared to HT tenocytes while a decrease in WST-1 was maintained at 7 days. CICP, PG and FBN (only at 3 days) syntheses were significantly higher in GCT tenocytes cultured on GJ. The negative effects on GC on GCT tenocytes cultured on membrane were particularly evident on SIS for CICP (,18%) and FBN (,67%) synthesis. The obtained results support the conclusion that GJ is more suitable than SIS as a scaffold for in situ tissue engineering and for the in vitro bioengineering of tendons to heal massive tears of the rotator cuff tendon. © 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 25:98,107, 2007 [source]


    Long-term effects of porcine small intestine submucosa on the healing of medial collateral ligament: A functional tissue engineering study

    JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Issue 4 2006
    Rui Liang
    Abstract Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was previously shown to enhance the mechanical properties of healing medial collateral ligaments (MCL), and the histomorphological appearance and collagen type V/I ratio were found to be close to those of normal MCL. We hypothesized that at a longer term, 26 weeks, SIS could guide a better organized neo-ligament formation, increasing mechanical properties and increasing collagen fibril diameters mediated by a reduction in collagen type V. A 6 mm gap injury in the right MCL was surgically created in 38 rabbits, while the contralateral intact MCL served as a sham-operated control. In half the animals, a strip of SIS was sutured onto the severed ends. In the other half, no SIS was applied. The cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined with a laser micrometer system. The femur,MCL,tibia complex was mechanically tested in uniaxial tension. Histomorphology was determined through H&E and immunofluorescent staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sodium-dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to determine collagen type V/I ratio. SIS-treated MCLs displayed a 28% reduction in CSA, a 33% increase in tangent modulus, and a 50% increase in tensile strength compared with the nontreated group (p,<,0.05). TEM showed groups of collagen fibrils with larger diameters in the SIS-treated ligaments in comparison with uniformly small fibrils for the nontreated group. H&E staining showed more densely stained collagen fibers in the SIS-treated group aligned along the longitudinal axis with more interspersed spindle-shaped cells. Immunofluorescent staining showed less collagen type V signals, confirmed by a 5% lower ratio of collagen type V/I compared with the nontreated controls (p,<,0.05). The findings extend the shorter term 12-week results, and support the potential of porcine SIS as a bioscaffold to enhance ligament healing. © 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res [source]


    Sacrocolpopexy using xenogenic acellular collagen in patients at increased risk for graft-related complications,,

    NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, Issue 4 2010
    Filip Claerhout
    Abstract Aims We studied the long-term anatomical and functional outcome following sacrocolpopexy for apical vaginal prolapse using xenogenic grafts in a population at increased risk for graft-related complications (GRCs). Methods Twenty-two consecutive patients with symptomatic apical prolapse were scheduled for laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy (LSC) with porcine grafts because they were presumed to be at risk for GRC, because of pre-existing vaginal ulcerations (n,=,4), concomitant vaginal prolapse repair (n,=,15), total hysterectomy (n,=,1), or intra-operative abdominal contamination due to accidental laceration of the vagina, bowel perforation (n,=,1) or the presence of infection (n,=,1). Either small intestinal submucosa (n,=,8) or dermal collagen (n,=,14) was used. Outcome measures were GRCs, anatomical cure (,Stage I at any compartment), subjective cure, impact on bowel, bladder, and sexual function measured by a standardized interview. Results At study closure 20 (91%) patients were available for functional evaluation and 16 (73%) for anatomical evaluation at a mean follow-up period of 27.4 months. The GRC rate was 25% (n,=,4) prompting reintervention in half, and including two patients with spondylodiscitis. The anatomical cure rate was 31.5%. Failures at the vault, anterior, and posterior compartments occurred in, respectively, 31%, 18.8%, and 50% of patients. The subjective cure rate was 60% and three patients (15%) underwent redo-LSC. Conclusion The strategy of using xenografts in patients at risk for GRC, did not prevent these to occur and was associated with a high anatomical and functional failure rate as well as reoperation rate. Neurourol. Urodynam. 29:563,567, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Rabbit Ear Cartilage Regeneration With a Small Intestinal Submucosa Graft,

    THE LARYNGOSCOPE, Issue S102 2004
    Edmund A. Pribitkin MD
    Abstract Objectives/Hypothesis: The objective was to demonstrate that interpositional grafting with porcine small intestinal submucosa promotes cartilage regeneration following excision of rabbit auricular cartilage. Study Design: Blinded, controlled study. Methods: Eight New Zealand white rabbits underwent excision of auricular cartilage on two sites with and two sites without preservation of perichondrium. Porcine small intestinal submucosa was implanted into one site with and one site without intact perichondrium. Remaining sites served as control sites. Histological assessment was performed at 3 (n = 4) and 6 (n = 3) months and at 1 year (n = 1) after grafting. Results: Histological evaluation showed cartilage regeneration accompanied by chronic inflammation in areas in which porcine small intestinal submucosa was implanted between layers of intact perichondrium. Other sites failed to show significant cartilage regeneration. Conclusion: The results of the study using porcine small intestinal submucosa as a bioscaffold for cartilage regeneration are promising and justify further animal and human studies. [source]


    Unsuccessful Alloplastic Esophageal Replacement With Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa

    ARTIFICIAL ORGANS, Issue 4 2009
    Thorsten Doede
    Abstract:, In general, there is no perfect method for esophageal replacement under consideration of the numerous associated risks and complications. The aim of this study was to examine a new material,small intestinal submucosa (SIS),in alloplastic esophageal replacement. We implanted tubular SIS prosthesis about 4 cm in length in the cervical esophagus of 14 piglets (weight 9,13 kg). For the first 10 days, the animals were fed parenterally, supplemented by free given water, followed by an oral feeding phase. Four weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed. Only 1 of the 14 animals survived the study period of 4 weeks. The other piglets had to be sacrificed prematurely because of severe esophageal stenosis. On postmortem exploration, the prosthesis could not be found either macroscopically or histologically. Sutures between the prosthesis and the cervical muscles did not improve the results. Until now, the use of alloplastic materials in esophageal replacement has failed irrespective of the kind of material. As well as in our experiments, severe stenosis had been reported in several animal studies. The reasons for this unacceptable high rate of stenosis after alloplastic esophageal replacement seem to be multifactorial. Possible solutions could be transanastomotic splints, less inert materials, the decrease of anastomotic tension by stay sutures, the use of adult stem cells, and tissue engineering. [source]


    Development and characterization of a tissue engineered pancreatic substitute based on recombinant intestinal endocrine L-cells

    BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOENGINEERING, Issue 4 2009
    Heather Bara
    Abstract A tissue engineered pancreatic substitute (TEPS) consisting of insulin-producing cells appropriately designed and encapsulated to support cellular function and prevent interaction with the host may provide physiological blood glucose regulation for the treatment of insulin dependent diabetes (IDD). The performance of agarose-based constructs which contained either a single cell suspension of GLUTag-INS cells, a suspension of pre-aggregated GLUTag-INS spheroids, or GLUTag-INS cells on small intestinal submucosa (SIS), was evaluated in vitro for total cell number, weekly glucose consumption and insulin secretion rates (GCR and ISR), and induced insulin secretion function. The three types of TEPS studied displayed similar number of cells, GCR, and ISR throughout 4 weeks of culture. However, the TEPS, which incorporated SIS as a substrate for the GLUTag-INS cells, was the only type of TEPS tested which was able to retain the induced insulin secretion function of non-encapsulated GLUTag-INS cells. Though improvements in the expression level of GLUTag-INS cells and/or the number of viable cells contained within the TEPS are needed for successful treatment of a murine model of IDD, this study has revealed a potential method for promoting proper cellular function of recombinant L-cells upon incorporation into an implantable three-dimensional TEPS. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2009;103: 828,834. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    A tissue-engineered suburethral sling in an animal model of stress urinary incontinence

    BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 4 2005
    Tracy W. Cannon
    OBJECTIVE To create and evaluate the functional effects of a tissue-engineered sling in an animal model of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four equal groups: a control group (C) had no intervention before the leak-point pressure (LPP) was measured; a denervated group (D) had bilateral proximal sciatic nerve transection (PSNT) and periurethral dissection with no sling placed; group S had concomitant bilateral PSNT and a suburethral sling of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) placed; and group (M) had concomitant bilateral PSNT with implantation of a tissue-engineered sling. The suburethral sling was placed via a transabdominal approach with the sling sutured to the pubic bone. Tissue-engineered slings were prepared with muscle-derived cells obtained via the pre-plate technique and subsequently seeded for 2 weeks on a SIS scaffold. Suburethral slings were implanted 2 weeks before LPP testing, using the vertical-tilt method. RESULTS Surgically placing a suburethral sling is feasible in the female rat, with few complications. LPPs from both sling groups (S and M) were not significantly different from untreated controls (C). The S, M and C groups all had significantly higher LPPs than group D. Importantly, no rat from either sling group (S and M) had signs of urinary retention. CONCLUSIONS Placing tissue-engineered slings in an animal model of SUI resulted in LPP values that were not significantly different from those in untreated control or SIS (S) groups. These data show that incorporating muscle stem cells into SIS slings does not adversely alter the advantageous mechanical properties of the SIS sling in a model of SUI, and provide the basis for future functional studies of tissue-engineered sling materials with long-term retention. [source]


    Porcine small intestinal submucosa as a percutaneous mid-urethral sling: 2-year results

    BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 1 2005
    J. Stephen Jones
    OBJECTIVE To report the 2-year follow-up results on patients treated with a novel minimally invasive outpatient procedure for placing a mid-urethral sling, using porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). PATIENTS AND METHODS Thirty-four women with urodynamic evidence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI, 19) or of SUI with a positive cough test (15) were treated. A curved ligature carrier was used to create a tract between bilateral suprapubic stab incisions and a 2-cm mid-urethral vaginal incision. A suture secured to each end of the SIS sling was placed through the eyelet of the ligature carrier. Extraction was used to position the sling at the mid-urethra, providing a backboard of support that was remodelled with ingrowth of the patient's autologous tissue. RESULTS SUI was reportedly cured in 27 of the 34 women (79%) at the 2-year follow-up; three (9%) of those with no complete resolution were pleased with their results, because the improvement allowed them to wear an average one or fewer pads per day. One patient developed de novo urge incontinence. Three patients (9%) developed suprapubic inflammation at 10, 21 and 45 days after surgery; all resolved, but one had a recurrence of SUI. No prolonged retention, erosion or other complications were noted. CONCLUSIONS Early results with the percutaneous mid-urethral placement of SIS are promising and potentially comparable with those after using synthetic minimally invasive slings. [source]


    Mitochondrial metabolism in the rat during bladder regeneration induced by small intestinal submucosa

    BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 3 2004
    Rozbeh Faramarzi-Roques
    OBJECTIVE To assess mitochondrial metabolism of bladder tissue induced by small-intestinal submucosa (SIS), by comparing the mitochondrial enzyme metabolism in this tissue with that in normal bladder tissue and thus evaluate intracellular normality. MATERIAL AND METHODS In all, 70 rats were grouped into healthy controls (10), surgical controls with a simple bladder incision (15) and rats treated by partial cystectomy with replacement by the SIS graft (45). At 1, 3 and 6 months the rats were killed, the enzymes of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes assayed, and the respiration of permeabilized bladder fibres assessed using polarographic analysis. RESULTS The enzyme activities of control and treated rats at 3 months were identical. The results from the polarographic analysis of respiration were also similar to that in normal tissue apart from a decrease in the number of mitochondria. Histologically, there was complete regeneration at 6 months. CONCLUSION After a phase of inflammation the bladder regenerates after a patch is placed. The new tissue has the same enzymatic and histological features as normal bladder tissue. [source]


    Tissue reaction of the rabbit urinary bladder to tension-free vaginal tape and porcine small intestinal submucosa

    BJU INTERNATIONAL, Issue 6 2002
    D.M. Rabah
    Objectives ,To compare the histological tissue reactions of urinary bladder in close contact with polypropylene mesh tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) or porcine small intestinal submucosal (SIS) grafts, as the commercial availability of various materials has considerably simplified sling procedures for treating urinary incontinence, but erosion and infection after using artificial sling materials remain an important concern. Materials and methods ,Thirty female New Zealand rabbits were randomized to three groups, i.e. group A (TVT, 12 animals), group B (SIS, 12) and group C (surgical control, six). Through a laparotomy under anaesthesia and an aseptic technique, the bladder was approached at its dome, where a 0.5 × 1 cm piece of TVT or SIS was fixed in direct contact with the bladder wall. The control group underwent only bladder manipulation with no material applied. Half the animals in each group were killed after 6 weeks and the other half after 12 weeks. The urinary bladder was harvested and examined histologically. Results ,The grafts in both groups were characterized by dense foreign-body type reactions and were mostly attached loosely to the bladder wall by a thin layer of fibrovascular tissue. More importantly, the bladder wall reactions showed no inflammation in all 12 animals in group A (TVT) but three of them had various grades of fibrosis. There was severe transmural inflammation in one animal in group B (SIS); one rabbit had grade I and two had grade II fibrosis. The controls, as expected, showed no bladder wall reactions. Conclusion ,In this descriptive analysis of reaction types elicited on the urinary bladder by these grafts, both materials appeared to be safe. Although TVT elicited fewer and less severe adverse reactions, no statistical conclusions can be drawn. The clinical significance of these findings should emerge from long-term clinical data when they become available. [source]


    Biodisk: A new device for closure of patent foramen ovale: A feasibility study in swine,

    CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Issue 6 2010
    Dusan Pavcnik MD
    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of a porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-covered Biodisk (BD) for the closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in swine. Methods: Twelve piglets (9,30 kg) with PFO ranging in size from 6 to 12 mm were used for the in vivo testing. The BD device consisted of two basic nitinol wire components covered with platinum coil, a flexible SIS-covered ring, and an anchor. The BD was advanced through an 8-Fr sheath from the femoral vein. Nine acute animals were used to test the BD for deployment, stability, immediate shunt closure, and device repositioning before or after its detachment. To assess retrievability, four devices were deployed and intentionally embolized into the RA (n = 2) and LA (n = 2). The effectiveness of the device was evaluated by angiocardiography. EKG was recorded before and after PFO closure for 3 hr. From the 12 animals, nine were acute and three were followed; one for 6 weeks, one for 12 weeks, and one for 16 weeks. Results: Successful device implantation was achieved in all animals with no shunting of contrast media observed during follow-up in. One animal needed to have device repositioned for complete PFO occlusion because of suboptimal placement at the first attempt. The device was easily placed and retrieved before detachment in all nine animals in the acute study. None of the BDs spontaneously embolized during release or on follow-up. EKG did not demonstrate arrhythmias during or after treatment. Four intentionally embolized BDs were easily retrieved with an Amplatz goose neck snare. Macroscopic and histologic evaluation of the three long-term animals showed that devices were well incorporated in the atrial septum with complete shunt closure. The SIS showed progressive remodeling with the host cells. There was also progressive endothelization of the BD device. Conclusion: The BD device deployment is feasible, safe, and effective. Long-term studies are needed to evaluate its long-term effectiveness. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]