Human Identity (human + identity)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Story of Abraham and Models of Human Identity

NEW BLACKFRIARS, Issue 1021 2008
Dr Mary Mills S.H.C.J
Abstract This paper explores the profiles of the women characters Sarah and Hagar as models of human identity. The two characters can only be explored through reading the over-arching narrative of the story of Abraham. Their profiles and narrated personalities have to be extracted from that narrative, but there is a two-sided nature of this necessity. If Sarah and Hagar cannot be separated from the biblical narrator's engagement with father Abraham, neither can Abraham function as father of the nations except through his interaction with these two women. The reader is thus led towards an understanding of how the stories of Genesis 12,24 deal with the issue of parenthood. The body of the paper consists in a close reading of the biblical material following a method of reading which is rooted in the use of imagination as an exegetical tool , a style adopted by Paul in his allegorical approach to Sarah and Hagar in Galatians 4. This approach opens into narrative criticism with a focus on characterisation and on the interactions of Sarah, Hagar and Abraham, caught up in a Domestic Comedy. The women's characters are explored through the themes of parenthood as other, the other woman and woman as other. A final section explores some of the points of narrative ethics to be extracted from the close textual readings of the paper, with reference to the writings of Paul Ricoeur and Emmanuel Levinas. It is suggested that female as well as male characters may offer fruitful models for human identity. [source]


Towards a Fuller Human Identity: a Phenomenology of Family Life, Social Harmony, and the Recovery of the Black Self.

THE HEYTHROP JOURNAL, Issue 3 2008
By Pius Ojara
First page of article [source]


Front and Back Covers, Volume 25, Number 2.

ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY, Issue 2 2009
April 200
Front cover caption, volume 25 issue 2 Front cover Ethnicity, Race and the Limits of Human Identity The front and back covers show artist Sean Weisgerber's interpretation of the theme of this issue, the problem of classifying human identity in a world of fusion and change. Articles address biometric security, the use of the concept of ,tribe' in US army counter-insurgency programmes, and human identity as constituted in and through debate among Afghani refugees recently returned from northern Pakistan to Afghanistan. The difficulty of fitting human diversity into strictly defined categories is most acutely evident in questions asked on census forms. In this issue, Peter Aspinall considers the broad range of terms proposed and debated for the ,mixed race' population. Many have complex histories and have been used to subsume individuals of varied and sometimes disparate ethnic and racial origins. Dissatisfaction with the widely used term ,mixed race', contested by anthropologists and sociologists among others on the grounds that it references the now discredited concept of ,race', has led to the search for an alternative. In 1994 the Royal Anthropological Institute advanced ,mixed origins', although such advocacy has gained little momentum. ,Mixed race' now competes with terms such as ,mixed heritage', ,dual heritage' and ,mixed parentage' amongst data users, and UK government usage also reflects this diversity in terminology. However, research indicates that the term of choice of most respondents in general and student samples of this population is ,mixed race'. Terms invoking just two groups , such as ,mixed parentage', ,dual heritage', and ,biracial', are preferred by few. While ,mixed origins' is likely to have a continuing niche role in professional practice, such as legal usage and assessment of health risks, it is premature to argue that the umbrella term ,mixed race' should be replaced by candidates that are not self-descriptors. Bruno Latour's editorial places such questions in a broader context as he draws attention to a lively debate on the biggest question of all, the essence of nature itself. In the context of an emergent multi-naturalism, has anthropological theory itself been ,decolonizing enough'? [source]


Effects of mortality salience aroused by threats against human identity on intergroup bias

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2009
Echebarria-Echabe Agustin
An experimental study on the effects of mortality salience aroused by threats against different components of the Self (personal, social and human identities) on intergroup bias is presented. It is hypothesised and found that the mortality salience per se does not inevitably led to increments of intergroup bias. This increment occurs when mortality salience is aroused by threats against personal or social identities. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The Story of Abraham and Models of Human Identity

NEW BLACKFRIARS, Issue 1021 2008
Dr Mary Mills S.H.C.J
Abstract This paper explores the profiles of the women characters Sarah and Hagar as models of human identity. The two characters can only be explored through reading the over-arching narrative of the story of Abraham. Their profiles and narrated personalities have to be extracted from that narrative, but there is a two-sided nature of this necessity. If Sarah and Hagar cannot be separated from the biblical narrator's engagement with father Abraham, neither can Abraham function as father of the nations except through his interaction with these two women. The reader is thus led towards an understanding of how the stories of Genesis 12,24 deal with the issue of parenthood. The body of the paper consists in a close reading of the biblical material following a method of reading which is rooted in the use of imagination as an exegetical tool , a style adopted by Paul in his allegorical approach to Sarah and Hagar in Galatians 4. This approach opens into narrative criticism with a focus on characterisation and on the interactions of Sarah, Hagar and Abraham, caught up in a Domestic Comedy. The women's characters are explored through the themes of parenthood as other, the other woman and woman as other. A final section explores some of the points of narrative ethics to be extracted from the close textual readings of the paper, with reference to the writings of Paul Ricoeur and Emmanuel Levinas. It is suggested that female as well as male characters may offer fruitful models for human identity. [source]


Pushing the Dead into the Next Reproductive Frontier: Post Mortem Gamete Retrieval under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

THE JOURNAL OF LAW, MEDICINE & ETHICS, Issue 2 2009
Bethany SpielmanArticle first published online: 3 JUN 200
In re Matter of Daniel Thomas Christy authorized post mortem gamete retrieval under the most recent revision of the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act. This article recommends that the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws explicitly address the issue of post mortem gamete retrieval for reproductive purposes; that legislators specify whether their states will follow the Christy ruling; and that ethics committees and consultants prepare for the questions about human identity and self determination that post mortem gamete retrieval raises. [source]


Origins and revolutions: human identity in earliest prehistory , By Clive Gamble

THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 2 2010
Erella Hovers
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Front and Back Covers, Volume 25, Number 2.

ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY, Issue 2 2009
April 200
Front cover caption, volume 25 issue 2 Front cover Ethnicity, Race and the Limits of Human Identity The front and back covers show artist Sean Weisgerber's interpretation of the theme of this issue, the problem of classifying human identity in a world of fusion and change. Articles address biometric security, the use of the concept of ,tribe' in US army counter-insurgency programmes, and human identity as constituted in and through debate among Afghani refugees recently returned from northern Pakistan to Afghanistan. The difficulty of fitting human diversity into strictly defined categories is most acutely evident in questions asked on census forms. In this issue, Peter Aspinall considers the broad range of terms proposed and debated for the ,mixed race' population. Many have complex histories and have been used to subsume individuals of varied and sometimes disparate ethnic and racial origins. Dissatisfaction with the widely used term ,mixed race', contested by anthropologists and sociologists among others on the grounds that it references the now discredited concept of ,race', has led to the search for an alternative. In 1994 the Royal Anthropological Institute advanced ,mixed origins', although such advocacy has gained little momentum. ,Mixed race' now competes with terms such as ,mixed heritage', ,dual heritage' and ,mixed parentage' amongst data users, and UK government usage also reflects this diversity in terminology. However, research indicates that the term of choice of most respondents in general and student samples of this population is ,mixed race'. Terms invoking just two groups , such as ,mixed parentage', ,dual heritage', and ,biracial', are preferred by few. While ,mixed origins' is likely to have a continuing niche role in professional practice, such as legal usage and assessment of health risks, it is premature to argue that the umbrella term ,mixed race' should be replaced by candidates that are not self-descriptors. Bruno Latour's editorial places such questions in a broader context as he draws attention to a lively debate on the biggest question of all, the essence of nature itself. In the context of an emergent multi-naturalism, has anthropological theory itself been ,decolonizing enough'? [source]


RAOUL HAUSMANN'S REVOLUTIONARY MEDIA: DADA PERFORMANCE, PHOTOMONTAGE AND THE CYBORG

ART HISTORY, Issue 1 2007
MATTHEW BIRO
This article argues that Hausmann's poetry and performance practices of 1918 and 1919 prepared the ground for the cybernetic imagery that became prevalent in his caricatures, photomontages and assemblages of 1920. Through an examination of Hausmann's poetry and performance strategies, his concept of human identity, and his understanding of the relationship between sexuality and social revolution, a new understanding of Hausmann's visual concerns is developed. In particular, this article investigates why Hausmann's portraits often undermined their sitter's identity; why Hausmann sometimes emphasized sexuality in his representations; and why, in addition to reminding their viewers of mechanized war, Hausmann's images of the human,machine interface anticipated many of the ideas inherent in the concept of the cyborg developed in the later twentieth century. [source]