Human Hepatocyte Cell Line (human + hepatocyte_cell_line)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A reversibly immortalized human hepatocyte cell line as a source of hepatocyte-based biological support

ADDICTION BIOLOGY, Issue 4 2001
Naoya Kobayashi
The application of hepatocyte transplantation (HTX) is increasingly envisioned for temporary metabolic support during acute liver failure and provision of specific liver functions in inherited liver-based metabolic diseases. Compared with whole liver transplantation, HTX is a technically simple procedure and hepatocytes can be cryopreserved for future use. A major limitation of this form of therapy in humans is the worldwide shortage of human livers for isolating an adequate number of transplantable human hepatocyes when needed. Furthermore, the numbers of donor livers available for hepatocyte isolation is limited by competition for their use in whole organ transplantation. Considering the cost of hepatocyte isolation and the need for immediate preparation of consistent and functional cells, it is unlikely that human hepatocytes can be obtained on such a scale to treat a large number of patients with falling liver functions. The utilization of xenogenic hepatocytes will result in additional concerns regarding transmission of infectious pathogens and immunological and physiological incompatibilities between animals and humans. An attractive alternative to primary human hepatocytes is the use of tightly regulated human hepatocyte cell lines. Such cell lines can provide the advantages of unlimited availability, sterility and uniformity. We describe here methods for creating transplantable human hepatocyte cell lines using currently available cell cultures and gene transfer technology. [source]


Cyclosporin A suppresses replication of hepatitis C virus genome in cultured hepatocytes

HEPATOLOGY, Issue 5 2003
Koichi Watashi
Persistent infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Searching for a substance with anti-HCV potential, we examined the effects of a variety of compounds on HCV replication using a HCV subgenomic replicon cell culture system. Consequently, the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) was found to have a suppressive effect on the HCV replicon RNA level and HCV protein expression in these cells. CsA also inhibited multiplication of the HCV genome in a cultured human hepatocyte cell line infected with HCV using HCV-positive plasma. This anti-HCV activity of CsA appeared to be independent of its immunosuppressive function. In conclusion, our results suggest that CsA may represent a new approach for the development of anti-HCV therapy. [source]


Uptake of Lipiodol‘,cytotoxic conjugates by hepatoblastoma cells

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY (NOW INCLUDES EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SURGERY), Issue 4 2002
E. Towu
Background: Improvements in the management of children with hepatoblastoma have followed advances made in cytotoxic agents and treatment regimens. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of Lipiodol‘, an iodinated poppy-seed oil, on the uptake of anthracyclic cytotoxic conjugates by hepatoblastoma cells in culture. Methods: Monolayer cultures of (1) a hepatoblastoma cell line generated from freshly explanted tumour tissue, (2) an immortal hepatoblastoma cell line (C3a) and (3) a human hepatocyte cell line were exposed to doxorubicin 10 Ķg/ml with or without 2 per cent Lipiodol‘ for 1,72 h. The fluorescence intensity in the treated cells, which correlates with intracellular doxorubicin concentration, was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cytotoxicity was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and electron microscopy. Results: Doxorubicin accumulated in the nucleus and cytoplasm of all the cell lines. With Lipiodol‘, the mean fluorescence intensity of intracellular doxorubicin was increased for up to 48 h in both hepatoblastoma lines, but not in the hepatocyte cell line. Lipiodol‘ increased the uptake and intracellular concentration of doxorubicin in the hepatoblastoma cells in culture. Lipiodol‘ also enhanced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin on the cultured hepatoblastoma cells. Conclusion: Lipiodol‘ significantly enhanced the uptake of doxorubicin by hepatoblastoma cells in culture. Lipiodol‘,doxorubicin targeted treatment of hepatoblastoma may improve the intracellular uptake and hence cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in vivo, enabling a reduction in the total dose administered and side-effects. © 2002 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd [source]


A reversibly immortalized human hepatocyte cell line as a source of hepatocyte-based biological support

ADDICTION BIOLOGY, Issue 4 2001
Naoya Kobayashi
The application of hepatocyte transplantation (HTX) is increasingly envisioned for temporary metabolic support during acute liver failure and provision of specific liver functions in inherited liver-based metabolic diseases. Compared with whole liver transplantation, HTX is a technically simple procedure and hepatocytes can be cryopreserved for future use. A major limitation of this form of therapy in humans is the worldwide shortage of human livers for isolating an adequate number of transplantable human hepatocyes when needed. Furthermore, the numbers of donor livers available for hepatocyte isolation is limited by competition for their use in whole organ transplantation. Considering the cost of hepatocyte isolation and the need for immediate preparation of consistent and functional cells, it is unlikely that human hepatocytes can be obtained on such a scale to treat a large number of patients with falling liver functions. The utilization of xenogenic hepatocytes will result in additional concerns regarding transmission of infectious pathogens and immunological and physiological incompatibilities between animals and humans. An attractive alternative to primary human hepatocytes is the use of tightly regulated human hepatocyte cell lines. Such cell lines can provide the advantages of unlimited availability, sterility and uniformity. We describe here methods for creating transplantable human hepatocyte cell lines using currently available cell cultures and gene transfer technology. [source]