Future Goals (future + goal)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Advanced Education in Prosthodontics: Residents' Perspectives on Their Current Training and Future Goals

JOURNAL OF PROSTHODONTICS, Issue 2 2010
DMSc, Zeyad H. Al-Sowygh BDS
Abstract Purpose: The purposes of this study were to identify current prosthodontic residents' demographics and to document prosthodontic residents' perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. Materials and Methods: A 52-item survey was created and distributed to prosthodontic residents in the United States on February 8, 2007. The data collected were analyzed; the means and standard deviations were calculated and ranked. Statistical analysis was conducted using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney analysis (p= 0.05). Results: A 43% response rate was achieved, representing approximately 48% of the total population of prosthodontic residents in the United States. The majority of residents ranked clinical education as the most important factor in selecting their programs, were satisfied with their training, and planned to pursue the certification of the American Board of Prosthodontics. When asked how often they planned to work, 4 days a week was the most common answer. Conclusion: This is the first report identifying current prosthodontic residents' demographics and their perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. Several trends were identified, indicating a bright future for the specialty. By knowing the students' perceptions regarding their training and future goals, the American College of Prosthodontists and/or program directors will be able to use this information to improve residency programs and the specialty. [source]


The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS): Status and recommendations

MOVEMENT DISORDERS, Issue 7 2003
Article first published online: 18 MAR 200
Abstract The Movement Disorder Society Task Force for Rating Scales for Parkinson's Disease prepared a critique of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Strengths of the UPDRS include its wide utilization, its application across the clinical spectrum of PD, its nearly comprehensive coverage of motor symptoms, and its clinimetric properties, including reliability and validity. Weaknesses include several ambiguities in the written text, inadequate instructions for raters, some metric flaws, and the absence of screening questions on several important non-motor aspects of PD. The Task Force recommends that the MDS sponsor the development of a new version of the UPDRS and encourage efforts to establish its clinimetric properties, especially addressing the need to define a Minimal Clinically Relevant Difference and a Minimal Clinically Relevant Incremental Difference, as well as testing its correlation with the current UPDRS. If developed, the new scale should be culturally unbiased and be tested in different racial, gender, and age-groups. Future goals should include the definition of UPDRS scores with confidence intervals that correlate with clinically pertinent designations, "minimal," "mild," "moderate," and "severe" PD. Whereas the presence of non-motor components of PD can be identified with screening questions, a new version of the UPDRS should include an official appendix that includes other, more detailed, and optionally used scales to determine severity of these impairments. 2003 Movement Disorder Society [source]


Pathology of the Thin-Cap Fibroatheroma:

JOURNAL OF INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
A Type of Vulnerable Plaque
Thin cap atheroma is the precursor of plaque rupture, which accounts for a majority of coronary thrombi. The morphologic features of thin cap atheromas that predict rupture are unknown, but we know from studies of ruptured plaques that large necrotic cores, fibrous cap <65 microns and numerous macrophages within the cap likely indicate instability. There is some evidence that a speckled pattern of calcification is associated with vulnerability to rupture. There are usually multiple thin cap atheroma in the hearts of patients dying with acute plaque rupture, as well as multiple fibroatheromas with intraplaque hemorrhage. Targeted therapy for the purpose of stabilizing coronary lesions that are prone to rupture is a major future goal of the interventionist. (J Interven Cardiol 2003;16:267,272) [source]


EXPLAINING THE EDUCATIONAL DEFICITS OF DELINQUENT YOUTHS,

CRIMINOLOGY, Issue 3 2008
SONJA E. SIENNICK
Why do delinquent youths complete less education than do their conventional peers? Theory and research in criminology and in the sociology of education suggest that two aspects of youths' commitment to education, their future goals and their behavioral investments in those goals, may explain the delinquency-education relationship, but only when considered jointly. Using panel data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, we find that educational expectations and school effort together explain delinquents' lower rates of college attendance and graduation, but of these two factors, effort provides the more powerful explanation. We also find that transcript grades explain more of the delinquency-education relationship than do self-reported grades, which indicates that delinquent youths may not know exactly how they are performing in school. Our findings suggest that the aspirational and behavioral components of commitment to education are only loosely coupled, and that delinquent youths may not understand how their behavior can jeopardize their goals. [source]


Development and Implementation of a Relative Value Scale for Teaching in Emergency Medicine: The Teaching Value Unit

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 8 2003
Naghma S. Khan MD
Abstract Relative value units exist for measuring clinical productivity. Limited objective measures exist, however, for nonclinical activities, specifically teaching. Objective: To develop an objective measure of teaching productivity linked to a performance-based incentive plan. Methods: Teaching goals and objectives were identified before the 1998,1999 academic year. Teaching value units (TVUs), objective measures for quantifying teaching activities, were developed and assigned based on an estimation of time needed to complete each activity and weighted for importance to the teaching mission. Each physician was allocated teaching time based on past performance and future goals. Targeted TVUs necessary to meet expectations were proportionate to allocated teaching time. Teaching productivity was defined as a percentage of targeted TVUs achieved. Incentive dollars for teaching were distributed based on percentage of targeted TVUs achieved, weighted individually for teaching load. Results: Teaching productivity was evaluated over a three-year period. In year 1, mean TVUs allocated/physician were 181 units (range 25 to 449). Four of 18 physicians (22%) met expectations. The mean individual TVUs achieved were 54% of expected (range 0% to 114%). By year 3, mean TVUs allocated/physician were 179 (range 45 to 629). Twelve of 22 physicians (55%) met expectations. The mean individual TVUs achieved were 82% of expected (range 11% to 146%). Between year 1 and year 3, group productivity increased from 73% to 88%, and mean individual productivity increased from 54% to 82% (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The development of a TVU-based system enabled objective quantification and monitoring of a broad range of teaching activities. The TVU-based system linked to an incentive plan helped to increase individual and group teaching productivity. [source]


STILL A PATCHWORK QUILT: A NATIONWIDE SURVEY OF STATE LAWS REGARDING STEPPARENT RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS

FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2010
Susan L. Pollet
This article surveys state laws regarding stepparents and stepchildren throughout the United States with regard to custody and visitation rights, child support obligations, adoption and inheritance rights. It provides background information, statistics and general definitions regarding stepparents, a review of some of the psychological and legal literature, information regarding websites and articles for the general public on the topic, and a description of the survey of the states nationwide. Finally, it provides some suggestions regarding future goals for the law in this arena. [source]


Advanced Education in Prosthodontics: Residents' Perspectives on Their Current Training and Future Goals

JOURNAL OF PROSTHODONTICS, Issue 2 2010
DMSc, Zeyad H. Al-Sowygh BDS
Abstract Purpose: The purposes of this study were to identify current prosthodontic residents' demographics and to document prosthodontic residents' perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. Materials and Methods: A 52-item survey was created and distributed to prosthodontic residents in the United States on February 8, 2007. The data collected were analyzed; the means and standard deviations were calculated and ranked. Statistical analysis was conducted using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney analysis (p= 0.05). Results: A 43% response rate was achieved, representing approximately 48% of the total population of prosthodontic residents in the United States. The majority of residents ranked clinical education as the most important factor in selecting their programs, were satisfied with their training, and planned to pursue the certification of the American Board of Prosthodontics. When asked how often they planned to work, 4 days a week was the most common answer. Conclusion: This is the first report identifying current prosthodontic residents' demographics and their perspectives on their clinical training and future goals. Several trends were identified, indicating a bright future for the specialty. By knowing the students' perceptions regarding their training and future goals, the American College of Prosthodontists and/or program directors will be able to use this information to improve residency programs and the specialty. [source]


Genetic modifiers of the severity of sickle cell anemia identified through a genome-wide association study,

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
Paola Sebastiani
We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the severity of sickle cell anemia in 1,265 patients with either "severe" or "mild" disease based on a network model of disease severity. We analyzed data using single SNP analysis and a novel SNP set enrichment analysis (SSEA) developed to discover clusters of associated SNPs. Single SNP analysis discovered 40 SNPs that were strongly associated with sickle cell severity (odds for association >1,000); of the 32 that we could analyze in an independent set of 163 patients, five replicated, eight showed consistent effects although failed to reach statistical significance, whereas 19 did not show any convincing association. Among the replicated associations are SNPs in KCNK6 a K+ channel gene. SSEA identified 27 genes with a strong enrichment of significant SNPs (P < 10,6); 20 were replicated with varying degrees of confidence. Among the novel findings identified by SSEA is the telomere length regulator gene TNKS. These studies are the first to use GWAS to understand the genetic diversity that accounts the phenotypic heterogeneity sickle cell anemia as estimated by an integrated model of severity. Additional validation, resequencing, and functional studies to understand the biology and reveal mechanisms by which candidate genes might have their effects are the future goals of this work. Am. J. Hematol., 2010. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


A Four-Year Perspective of Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Tests: An Online Testing Tool for Medical Students

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2009
Emily L. Senecal MD
Abstract Nationwide survey findings that most U.S. emergency medicine clerkship directors were interested in participating in a methodologically rigorous student testing program prompted the development of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Medical Student Online Testing Service (SAEM Tests). This article describes the development of SAEM Tests and details usage and progress since the on-line release in June 2005. Specifically, we review the construction of SAEM Tests and present validity and difficulty statistics obtained at the first analysis of test performance 6 months after its release and again 12 months later after revisions aimed at enhancing test performance. We then review the current status of SAEM Tests and summarize future goals and directions. [source]


Screening and Brief Intervention to Reduce Marijuana Use Among Youth and Young Adults in a Pediatric Emergency Department

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 11 2009
Edward Bernstein MD
Abstract Objectives:, Marijuana was involved in 209,563 emergency department (ED) visits in 2006, according to the Drug Abuse Warning Network. Although screening and brief intervention (SBI) has been effective in changing drinking among ED patients in a number of studies, tests of marijuana SBI in a pediatric emergency department (PED) have not yet been reported. The aim of this pilot study was to test whether SBI is effective in reducing marijuana consumption among youth and young adults presenting to a PED with a diverse range of clinical entities. Methods:, A three-group randomized controlled preliminary trial was structured to test 1) differences between Intervention (Int) and standard Assessed Control (AC) groups in marijuana consumption, from baseline to 12 months, and 2) the feasibility of adding a Nonassessed Control (NAC) group to evaluate regression to the mean and assessment reactivity. Patients aged 14,21 years in an urban, academic PED were screened during 2006,2007, using standardized risk factor questions. Subjects were eligible if they used marijuana three or more times in the past 30 days, but were excluded for co-occurring high-risk alcohol use. Consented enrollees were randomized to NAC, AC, and Int groups in a two-stage process that permitted blinding to status during assessment and follow-up. NACs received a resource handout, written advice about marijuana use risks, and a 12-month follow-up appointment. ACs were assessed using standardized instruments and received resources, written advice, and 3- and 12-month follow-up appointments. The Int group received assessment, resources, written advice, 3- and 12-month appointments, a 20-minute structured conversation conducted by older peers, and a 10-day booster telephone call. A peer educator utilized a motivational style interview protocol adapted for adolescents to elicit daily life context and future goals, provide feedback, review pros and cons of marijuana use, assess readiness to change, evaluate strengths and assets, negotiate a contract for change, and make referrals to treatment and/or other resources. Measurements included demographic information; 30-day self-report of marijuana use; attempts to quit, cut back, or change conditions of use; and risk factor questions repeated at follow-up. Results:, Among 7,804 PED patients screened, 325 were eligible; 210 consented and enrolled (Int, n = 68; AC, n = 71; NAC, n = 71), with a 12-month follow-up rate of 71%. For the primary objective, we compared Int to AC. At 12 months, Int participants were more likely to be abstinent for the past 30 days than ACs (odds ratio [OR] for reported abstinence = 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22 to 6.84, p < 0.014). The Int group had greater reduction in days used, baseline to 12 months, controlling for baseline (Int = ,7.1 vs. AC = ,1.8), were less likely to have been high among those who smoked (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.17 to 0.89, p < 0.05), and were more likely to receive referrals. In a linear regression model controlling for baseline use, NACs smoked 4 fewer days per month than ACs, but consumption was not significantly different, suggesting no assessment reactivity effect. Conclusions:, A preliminary trial of SBI promoted marijuana abstinence and reduced consumption among PED patients aged 14,21 years. A no-contact condition for the NAC group over the year after enrollment was insufficient to capture enrollees for follow-up across a range of baseline acuity. [source]


The WASP project in the era of robotic telescope networks

ASTRONOMISCHE NACHRICHTEN, Issue 8 2006
D. J. Christian
Abstract We present the current status of the WASP project, a pair of wide angle photometric telescopes, individually called Super-WASP. SuperWASP-I is located in La Palma, and SuperWASP-II at Sutherland in South Africa. SW-I began operations in April 2004. SW-II is expected to be operational in early 2006. Each SuperWASP instrument consists of up to 8 individual cameras using ultra-wide field lenses backed by high-quality passively cooled CCDs. Each camera covers 7.8 7.8 sq degrees of sky, for nearly 500 sq degrees of total sky coverage. One of the current aims of the WASP project is the search for extra-solar planet transits with a focus on brighter stars in the magnitude range ,8 to 13. Additionally, WASP will search for optical transients, track Near-Earth Objects, and study many types of variable stars and extragalactic objects. The collaboration has developed a custom-built reduction pipeline that achieves better than 1 percent photometric precision. We discuss future goals, which include: nightly on-mountain reductions that could be used to automatically drive alerts via a small robotic telescope network, and possible roles of the WASP telescopes as providers in such a network. Additional technical details of the telescopes, data reduction, and consortium members and institutions can be found on the web site at: http://www.superwasp.org/. ( 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) [source]