Finance Organization (finance + organization)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


In search of finance excellence

JOURNAL OF CORPORATE ACCOUNTING & FINANCE, Issue 3 2008
Thomas Wunder
In recent years, CFOs have been asked to improve efficiency and competitive cost structures within the Finance department, while simultaneously meeting the growing demands of the company's operations. This occurs, of course, while CFOs have also had to face additional external scrutiny and compliance requirements. Together, these developments place themes like "finance excellence" or "finance transformation" at the top of the CFO's agenda. In many cases, the result is a comprehensive reorientation of the entire Finance organization with significant performance improvements in both Finance and the entire company. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Finance organizations, decisions and emotions

THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, Issue 1 2002
Jocelyn Pixley
ABSTRACT Analyses of global financial markets are dominated by atomized models of decision-making and behavioural psychology (,exuberance' or ,panic'). In contrast, this paper argues that overwhelmingly, finance organizations rather than ,individuals' make decisions, and routinely use emotions in formulating expectations. Keynes introduced emotion (business confidence and animal spirits) but in economics, emotion remains individualistic and irrational. Luhmann's system theory lies at the other extreme, where emotions like trust and confidence are central variables, functional in the reduction of complexity in sub-systems like the economy. The gap between irrational emotions aggregated to ,herd' behaviour in economics, and ,system trust' applied to finance and money as a ,medium of communication' in sociology, remains largely unfilled. This paper argues that while organizations cannot be said to ,think' or ,feel', they are rational and emotional, because impersonal trust, confidence and their contrary emotions are unavoidable in decision-making due to fundamental uncertainty. These future-oriented emotions are prevalent within and between organizations in the financial sector, primarily in generating expectations. The dynamic of corporate activities of tense and ruthless struggle is a more plausible level of analysis than either financial ,manias' in aggregate or ,system trust'. [source]


Shared Services Transformation: Conceptualization and Valuation from the Perspective of Real Options

DECISION SCIENCES, Issue 3 2009
Ning Su
ABSTRACT In today's volatile global economy, where many organizations face severe pressure to downsize, the "shared services" model, in which a firm merges common functions performed by multiple units into a single service delivery organization, provides an innovative approach to make business more efficient and effective. To successfully implement shared services, firms need to strategically decide whether and how to pursue various service transformation alternatives such as simplification, standardization, consolidation, insourcing, or outsourcing. In this study, we develop the notion of real options into a unique theoretical lens for conceptualizing service organizations and their transformation in an uncertain business environment. Specifically, we view service organization as a set of strategic options that give the firm preferential access to future transformation opportunities. We create a taxonomy of these options, and introduce a decision methodology for valuing alternative shared services transformation approaches. We illustrate this methodology by applying it in a real business case to justify a global firm's decision regarding the transformation of its finance organization. [source]


Finance organizations, decisions and emotions

THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, Issue 1 2002
Jocelyn Pixley
ABSTRACT Analyses of global financial markets are dominated by atomized models of decision-making and behavioural psychology (,exuberance' or ,panic'). In contrast, this paper argues that overwhelmingly, finance organizations rather than ,individuals' make decisions, and routinely use emotions in formulating expectations. Keynes introduced emotion (business confidence and animal spirits) but in economics, emotion remains individualistic and irrational. Luhmann's system theory lies at the other extreme, where emotions like trust and confidence are central variables, functional in the reduction of complexity in sub-systems like the economy. The gap between irrational emotions aggregated to ,herd' behaviour in economics, and ,system trust' applied to finance and money as a ,medium of communication' in sociology, remains largely unfilled. This paper argues that while organizations cannot be said to ,think' or ,feel', they are rational and emotional, because impersonal trust, confidence and their contrary emotions are unavoidable in decision-making due to fundamental uncertainty. These future-oriented emotions are prevalent within and between organizations in the financial sector, primarily in generating expectations. The dynamic of corporate activities of tense and ruthless struggle is a more plausible level of analysis than either financial ,manias' in aggregate or ,system trust'. [source]