Fast Track (fast + track)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Fast Track ,Your Next JFS Manuscript Submission

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 3 2001
Article first published online: 20 JUL 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Returning Nurses to the Workforce: Developing a Fast Track Back Program

NURSING FORUM, Issue 3 2006
Helen K. Burns PhD
TOPIC., Fast Track Back: Re-entry into Nursing Practice program. PURPOSE AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION.,Describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a state-of-the-art re-entry program facilitating the return of licensed nonpracticing RNs to the workforce through a quality education program that retools them for the workforce in the areas of pharmacology, skill development using the latest technology, practice standards, and nursing issues. The program consists of didactic content taught via classroom, Internet, skills laboratory, and high fidelity human simulated technology and a clinical component. CONCLUSIONS.,The program is a mechanism that enables re-entry nurses to improve skills and competencies necessary to practice in today's healthcare environment. [source]


Sector Switching from a Business to a Government Job: Fast-Track Career or Fast Track to Nowhere?

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
Barry Bozeman
This paper examines the career consequences for public managers of having had full-time private sector work experience. We find positive career outcomes for public managers with private sector experience: Individuals with such experience are more likely to have been recently promoted relative to peers and to supervise somewhat greater number of employees, especially if their most recent job was in the private sector. While experience in the private sector enhances such career outcomes, the length of such experience diminishes them. The authors conclude by identifying three career scenarios emerging from the models and discussing the managerial and theoretical implications of "sector-switching careers." [source]


Fast track: Has it changed patient care in the emergency department?

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, Issue 1 2008
Paul Kwa
Abstract Objective: To determine whether the introduction of a designated fast-track area altered the time to care and patient flow in an Australian mixed adult and paediatric ED. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of all patients presenting to the ED between 08.00 and 22.00 hours, during a 6 month period before and after the opening of a fast-track area. Data were stratified according to Australasian Triage Scale (ATS) category, and comparisons were made for performance indicators, waiting time, length of stay and did-not-waits. Results: During its operational hours, fast track managed 14.9% of all patients presenting to the ED. There was a significant increase in the proportion of all ATS 4 patients seen within their target times (77.8% to 79.9%, P < 0.001). There was a trend towards improved performance in ATS categories 2, 3 and 5. Median patient waiting times were significantly decreased in ATS 4 (24 to 22 min, P < 0.001) and ATS 5 (27 to 25 min, P < 0.05), but increased in ATS 2 (3 to 4 min, P < 0.05). No deterioration in performance or waiting time for ATS 1 was shown. There was a decreasing trend in the proportion of patients who did not wait to be assessed by a doctor in ATS categories 4 and 5. These improvements occurred despite a 12% increase in patient attendances and no change in medical staffing levels. Conclusions: Fast track in an Australian mixed ED can help meet the demand of increasing patient attendances, allowing lower-acuity patients to be seen quickly without a negative impact on high-acuity patients. [source]


Fast track to a phosphoprotein sketch , MALDI-TOF characterization of TLC-based tryptic phosphopeptide maps at femtomolar detection sensitivity

PROTEINS: STRUCTURE, FUNCTION AND BIOINFORMATICS, Issue 21 2006
Vitaly Kochin
Abstract Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping by TLC on microcrystalline cellulose has been a convenient method to get a fast and highly reproducible overview of the number of phosphopeptides present in any given 32P-labeled phosphoprotein. This method also provides an immediate presentation of the relative phosphorylation stoichiometry between individual phosphopeptides. However, so far, traditional tryptic phosphopeptide maps have not been useful for phosphoproteomics applications, as the S/N has been very poor, due to the large number of quenching substances and contaminants present on cellulose plates. In this study, we present a rapid and easy method for phosphopeptides identification from 2-D phosphopeptide maps (2-D-PPMs). We obtain improved sensitivity (femtomole levels) upon MALDI-TOF MS analysis of phosphopeptides extracted from 2-D-PPMs. Using this approach we could confidently characterize the major phosphorylation sites of in,vivo and in,vitro32P-labeled proteins. [source]


Fast track: Has it changed patient care in the emergency department?

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, Issue 1 2008
Paul Kwa
Abstract Objective: To determine whether the introduction of a designated fast-track area altered the time to care and patient flow in an Australian mixed adult and paediatric ED. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of all patients presenting to the ED between 08.00 and 22.00 hours, during a 6 month period before and after the opening of a fast-track area. Data were stratified according to Australasian Triage Scale (ATS) category, and comparisons were made for performance indicators, waiting time, length of stay and did-not-waits. Results: During its operational hours, fast track managed 14.9% of all patients presenting to the ED. There was a significant increase in the proportion of all ATS 4 patients seen within their target times (77.8% to 79.9%, P < 0.001). There was a trend towards improved performance in ATS categories 2, 3 and 5. Median patient waiting times were significantly decreased in ATS 4 (24 to 22 min, P < 0.001) and ATS 5 (27 to 25 min, P < 0.05), but increased in ATS 2 (3 to 4 min, P < 0.05). No deterioration in performance or waiting time for ATS 1 was shown. There was a decreasing trend in the proportion of patients who did not wait to be assessed by a doctor in ATS categories 4 and 5. These improvements occurred despite a 12% increase in patient attendances and no change in medical staffing levels. Conclusions: Fast track in an Australian mixed ED can help meet the demand of increasing patient attendances, allowing lower-acuity patients to be seen quickly without a negative impact on high-acuity patients. [source]


Accuracy of triage nurses in predicting patient disposition

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, Issue 4 2007
Anna Holdgate
Abstract Objective:, Increasing demand to reduce patient waiting times and improve patient flow has led to the introduction of a number of strategies such as fast track and patient streaming. The triage nurse is primarily responsible for identifying suitable patients, based on prediction of likely admission or discharge. The aim of the present study was to explore the accuracy with which triage nurses predict patient disposition. Methods:, Over two separate 1-week periods, triage nurses at two urban tertiary hospitals electronically recorded in real time whether they thought each patient would be admitted or discharged. The patient's ultimate disposition (admission or discharge), age, sex, diagnostic group, triage category and time of arrival were also recorded. Results:, In total, 1342 patients were included in the study, of which 36.0% were subsequently admitted. Overall, the triage nurse correctly predicted the disposition in 75.7% of patients (95% CI: 73.2,78.0). Nurses were more accurate at predicting discharge than admission (83.3%,vs 65.1%,,P = 0.04). Triage nurses were most accurate at predicting admission in patients with higher triage categories and most accurate at predicting discharge in patients with injuries and febrile illnesses (89.6%, 95% CI: 85.6,92.6). Predicted discharge was least accurate for patients with cardiovascular disease, with 41.1% (95% CI: 26.4,57.8) of predicted discharges in this category subsequently requiring admission. Conclusion:, Triage nurses can accurately predict likely discharge in specific subgroups of ED patients. This supports the role of triage nurses in appropriately identifying patients suitable for ,fast track' or streaming. [source]


In-vitro and in-vivo assays for angiogenesis-modulating drug discovery and development

JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY: AN INTERNATI ONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCE, Issue 2 2006
Michelle W. Phung
In the past 35 years, significant findings have been made in relation to angiogenesis, and how this usually normal physiological function is converted into an abnormal state in cancer. To search for agents that can inhibit angiogenesis, and thereby prevent a tumour from proliferation and spread that is ultimately fatal to the patient, various in-vitro assays have been developed. In addition, older assays have been refined usually into high throughput screening formats, mainly by the biopharmaceutical industry in their attempts to develop novel therapeutic molecules and maintain a pipeline of lead candidates. The central aim is to extract more accurate data that would facilitate the birth of innovative mechanisms to defeat aberrant angiogenesis in-vivo. At the same time, better in-vivo models have been established, with the goal to mimic as close as possible the natural progression of various types of neoplasms in response to a good angiogenic response. More clinically relevant models are needed as anti-angiogenesis drug discovery and drug development companies fast track their lead molecules from preclinical investigations to phase I clinical trials. [source]


Accuracy of triage nurses in predicting patient disposition

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA, Issue 4 2007
Anna Holdgate
Abstract Objective:, Increasing demand to reduce patient waiting times and improve patient flow has led to the introduction of a number of strategies such as fast track and patient streaming. The triage nurse is primarily responsible for identifying suitable patients, based on prediction of likely admission or discharge. The aim of the present study was to explore the accuracy with which triage nurses predict patient disposition. Methods:, Over two separate 1-week periods, triage nurses at two urban tertiary hospitals electronically recorded in real time whether they thought each patient would be admitted or discharged. The patient's ultimate disposition (admission or discharge), age, sex, diagnostic group, triage category and time of arrival were also recorded. Results:, In total, 1342 patients were included in the study, of which 36.0% were subsequently admitted. Overall, the triage nurse correctly predicted the disposition in 75.7% of patients (95% CI: 73.2,78.0). Nurses were more accurate at predicting discharge than admission (83.3%,vs 65.1%,,P = 0.04). Triage nurses were most accurate at predicting admission in patients with higher triage categories and most accurate at predicting discharge in patients with injuries and febrile illnesses (89.6%, 95% CI: 85.6,92.6). Predicted discharge was least accurate for patients with cardiovascular disease, with 41.1% (95% CI: 26.4,57.8) of predicted discharges in this category subsequently requiring admission. Conclusion:, Triage nurses can accurately predict likely discharge in specific subgroups of ED patients. This supports the role of triage nurses in appropriately identifying patients suitable for ,fast track' or streaming. [source]