Farm Equipment (farm + equipment)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Characteristics of Crashes With Farm Equipment That Increase Potential for Injury

THE JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2007
Corinne Peek-Asa MPH
ABSTRACT:,Context:Crash fatality and injury rates are higher on rural roadways than other roadway types. Although slow-moving farm vehicles and equipment are risk factors on rural roads, little is known about the characteristics of crashes with farm vehicles/equipment.Purpose:To describe crashes and injuries for the drivers of farm vehicles/equipment and non-farm vehicles involved in an injury crash. Passengers are not included in this analysis.Methods:Injury crashes were included that involved a farm vehicle/equipment and at least one non-farm vehicle reported in Iowa Department of Transportation crash data from 1995 to 2004. Odds ratios were calculated through logistic regression to identify increased odds for injury among drivers of non-farm vehicles and farm vehicles/equipment. We examined frequently occurring crash characteristics to identify crash scenarios leading to the highest odds for injury.Findings:Non-farm vehicle drivers were 5.23 times more likely to be injured than farm vehicle/equipment drivers (95% CI = 4.12,6.46). The absence of restraint use was a significant predictor of injury for both farm vehicle/equipment drivers (OR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.14,7.13) and non-farm vehicle drivers (OR = 2.53; 95% CI = 1.54,4.15). Crash characteristics increasing the odds of injury for non-farm vehicle drivers included speeding, passing the farm vehicle/equipment, driving on a county road, having a frontal impact collision, and crashing in darkness. Ejection was the strongest predictor of injury for the farm vehicle/equipment driver.Conclusion:Non-farm vehicle drivers were much more likely to be injured than farm vehicle/equipment drivers, suggesting that farm vehicle/equipment crash prevention should be a priority for all rural road users. Prevention strategies that reduce motor vehicle speed, assist in safe passing, increase seat belt use, and increase conspicuousness of the farm vehicle/equipment are suggested. [source]


Predictors of hearing loss in New York farmers

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 1 2001
Syni-An Hwang PhD
Abstract Background Data from the telephone interview portion of the New York Farm Family Health and Hazard Surveillance were used to study self-reported hearing loss in New York farmers. Methods One thousand six hundred and twenty-two persons completed the hearing loss and noise exposure interview. Hearing loss was defined as at least some trouble hearing in one or both ears. Predictors of hearing loss were determined using logistic regression. Results Twenty-two percent of participants reported hearing loss. From the logistic regression, significant confounders are age (P,=,0.0001), gender (P,=,0.0001), being from a livestock farm (P,=,0.012), and loss of consciousness due to head trauma (P,=,0.04). Significant noise exposures are more hours of lifetime exposure to noisy farm equipment (P,=,0.001) and having had a noisy non-farm job (with some hearing protection P,=,0.002, without any hearing protection P,=,0.0001). Conclusions Farm noise exposure is a serious risk to the hearing of this population. Although use of hearing protection should be encouraged, replacing and modifying farm equipment to decrease noise at the source should be the first priority. Am. J. Ind. Med. 40:23,31, 2001. 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Characteristics of Crashes With Farm Equipment That Increase Potential for Injury

THE JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2007
Corinne Peek-Asa MPH
ABSTRACT:,Context:Crash fatality and injury rates are higher on rural roadways than other roadway types. Although slow-moving farm vehicles and equipment are risk factors on rural roads, little is known about the characteristics of crashes with farm vehicles/equipment.Purpose:To describe crashes and injuries for the drivers of farm vehicles/equipment and non-farm vehicles involved in an injury crash. Passengers are not included in this analysis.Methods:Injury crashes were included that involved a farm vehicle/equipment and at least one non-farm vehicle reported in Iowa Department of Transportation crash data from 1995 to 2004. Odds ratios were calculated through logistic regression to identify increased odds for injury among drivers of non-farm vehicles and farm vehicles/equipment. We examined frequently occurring crash characteristics to identify crash scenarios leading to the highest odds for injury.Findings:Non-farm vehicle drivers were 5.23 times more likely to be injured than farm vehicle/equipment drivers (95% CI = 4.12,6.46). The absence of restraint use was a significant predictor of injury for both farm vehicle/equipment drivers (OR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.14,7.13) and non-farm vehicle drivers (OR = 2.53; 95% CI = 1.54,4.15). Crash characteristics increasing the odds of injury for non-farm vehicle drivers included speeding, passing the farm vehicle/equipment, driving on a county road, having a frontal impact collision, and crashing in darkness. Ejection was the strongest predictor of injury for the farm vehicle/equipment driver.Conclusion:Non-farm vehicle drivers were much more likely to be injured than farm vehicle/equipment drivers, suggesting that farm vehicle/equipment crash prevention should be a priority for all rural road users. Prevention strategies that reduce motor vehicle speed, assist in safe passing, increase seat belt use, and increase conspicuousness of the farm vehicle/equipment are suggested. [source]