Family Policies (family + policy)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Family Policies and Children's School Achievement in Single- Versus Two-Parent Families

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2003
Suet-ling Pong
We investigate the gap in math and science achievement of third- and fourth-graders who live with a single parent versus those who live with two parents in 11 countries. The United States and New Zealand rank last among the countries we compare in terms of the equality of achievement between children from single-parent families and those from two-parent homes. Following a multilevel analysis, we find single parenthood to be less detrimental when family policies equalize resources between single- and two-parent families. In addition, the single- and two-parent achievement gap is greater in countries where single-parent families are more prevalent. We conclude that national family policies can offset the negative academic outcomes of single parenthood. [source]


Family policy and social order , comparing the dynamics of family policy-making in Scandinavia and Confucian Asia

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 1 2003
Ka Lin
This article compares family policies in two Scandinavian and three Confucian Asian countries. Through a general survey on schemes of child allowance and parental leave, it seeks explaining factors for cross-regime diversity of the welfare systems. In focus are the agents affecting the family policy-making process, including social classes, the state, women and families. In order to assess the roles these agents have played, this study retraces the preconditions of family policy development and its associated socio-cultural backgrounds. Results from such an examination will illustrate how the social order determines the patterns of family policy, which offers a new path to travel to these different cultural ,worlds'. Taking the Confucian Asian states into its frame of reference, the study will take a fresh look at Scandinavian welfare systems, which still have some general implications for the study of the dynamics, model and outcome of family policy in an international context. [source]


Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, Issue 130 2005
Carol S. Hollenshead
Universities reported that when work/family policies were used, they often inspired loyalty and a sense of community among faculty. [source]


Work, Family, and Individual Factors Associated with Mothers Attaining Their Preferred Work Situations

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES RESEARCH JOURNAL, Issue 3 2008
Jenet JacobArticle first published online: 2 JUL 200
This study explores work, family, and individual factors associated with mothers attaining their preferred work situations, including full-time, part-time, work from home, and no paid work. Data are taken from a sub-sample of 1,777 mothers from a nationally representative sample contacted by random-digit dialing phone interviews by the University of Connecticut Center for Survey Research and Analysis and the Motherhood Study. Actual work situation, household income, spouse or partner's work situation, perception of family financial responsibility, race, and religion are associated with attaining preferred work situations using logistic regression, ANOVA, and chi-square analyses. Thirty-six percent of mothers who are in their preferred work situations have experienced fewer negative emotions and more positive emotions, suggesting implications for individual and family well-being and work,family policies. [source]


Family policy and social order , comparing the dynamics of family policy-making in Scandinavia and Confucian Asia

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 1 2003
Ka Lin
This article compares family policies in two Scandinavian and three Confucian Asian countries. Through a general survey on schemes of child allowance and parental leave, it seeks explaining factors for cross-regime diversity of the welfare systems. In focus are the agents affecting the family policy-making process, including social classes, the state, women and families. In order to assess the roles these agents have played, this study retraces the preconditions of family policy development and its associated socio-cultural backgrounds. Results from such an examination will illustrate how the social order determines the patterns of family policy, which offers a new path to travel to these different cultural ,worlds'. Taking the Confucian Asian states into its frame of reference, the study will take a fresh look at Scandinavian welfare systems, which still have some general implications for the study of the dynamics, model and outcome of family policy in an international context. [source]


Family Policies and Children's School Achievement in Single- Versus Two-Parent Families

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2003
Suet-ling Pong
We investigate the gap in math and science achievement of third- and fourth-graders who live with a single parent versus those who live with two parents in 11 countries. The United States and New Zealand rank last among the countries we compare in terms of the equality of achievement between children from single-parent families and those from two-parent homes. Following a multilevel analysis, we find single parenthood to be less detrimental when family policies equalize resources between single- and two-parent families. In addition, the single- and two-parent achievement gap is greater in countries where single-parent families are more prevalent. We conclude that national family policies can offset the negative academic outcomes of single parenthood. [source]


Family policy and social order , comparing the dynamics of family policy-making in Scandinavia and Confucian Asia

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 1 2003
Ka Lin
This article compares family policies in two Scandinavian and three Confucian Asian countries. Through a general survey on schemes of child allowance and parental leave, it seeks explaining factors for cross-regime diversity of the welfare systems. In focus are the agents affecting the family policy-making process, including social classes, the state, women and families. In order to assess the roles these agents have played, this study retraces the preconditions of family policy development and its associated socio-cultural backgrounds. Results from such an examination will illustrate how the social order determines the patterns of family policy, which offers a new path to travel to these different cultural ,worlds'. Taking the Confucian Asian states into its frame of reference, the study will take a fresh look at Scandinavian welfare systems, which still have some general implications for the study of the dynamics, model and outcome of family policy in an international context. [source]


Universal versus Economically Polarized Change in Age at First Birth: A French,British Comparison

POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW, Issue 1 2009
Michael S. Rendall
France and Britain in the 1980s and 1990s represented two contrasting institutional models for the integration of employment and motherhood: the "universalistic" regime in France offered subsidized childcare and maternity-leave benefits at all income levels; the "means-tested" regime in Britain mainly offered income-tested benefits for single mothers. Comparing the two countries, we test the hypothesis that the socioeconomic gradient of fertility timing has become increasingly mediated by family policy. We find increasing polarization in women's age at first birth by pre-childbearing occupation in Britain but not in France. Early first births persisted in Britain only among women in low-skill occupations, while shifts toward increasingly late first births occurred in clerical/secretarial occupations and higher occupational groups. Age at first birth increased across all occupations in France, but age at first birth in France was still much earlier on average than for all but low-skill British mothers. [source]


Alimony Rights and Intrahousehold Allocation of Resources: Evidence from Brazil

THE ECONOMIC JOURNAL, Issue 513 2006
Marcos A. Rangel
Can family policy affect well-being of individuals without altering the resources available to their families? This article examines the extension of alimony rights and obligations to cohabiting couples in Brazil. For women in intact relationships, alimony rights upon dissolution should improve outside options, strengthening their negotiating positions, and increasing their influence over intrahousehold allocation of resources. Robust econometric evidence indicates that more decision power in the hands of women impacts hours worked by female adults and investments in the education of children. This suggests that family policy and models of family decision making should take intrahousehold heterogeneity of preferences into account. [source]


"In the Best Interests of the Child": Mapping the (Re) Emergence of Pro-Adoption Politics in Contemporary Australia

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF POLITICS AND HISTORY, Issue 2 2009
Kate Murphy
This article seeks to understand, in historical and international perspective, recent governmental initiatives that aim to reinstate adoption as a viable policy option for the care and placement of children in Australia, with reference to two recent reports of the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Human and Family Services, Overseas Adoption in Australia: Report of the Inquiry into Adoption of Children from Overseas (2005), and The Winnable War on Drugs: The Impact of Illicit Drug Use on Families (2007) which raises adoption as a policy option for children of drug-addicted parents. These reports appear to signal a discursive shift away from the anti-adoption attitudes that have characterised the post-1970s period in response to the Stolen Generations and other past adoption practices. It is argued that this change can be understood as having been pushed to the fore by the conservative family policy of the Howard era and further fostered by international trends in adoption policy. [source]


Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, Issue 130 2005
Carol S. Hollenshead
Universities reported that when work/family policies were used, they often inspired loyalty and a sense of community among faculty. [source]