Family Obligations (family + obligation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Family obligation and the academic motivation of adolescents from asian, latin american, and european backgrounds

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR CHILD & ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT, Issue 94 2001
Andrew J. Fuligni
A sense of obligation to the family is associated with a greater belief in the importance and usefulness of education and accounts for the tendency of Asian and Latin American adolescents to have greater academic motivation than their equally achieving peers with European backgrounds. [source]


Children investing in their families: The importance of child obligation in successful development

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR CHILD & ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT, Issue 94 2001
Thomas S. Weisner
Family obligation and assistance are fundamental features of children's development that link general developmental processes with the context of a particular historical moment and a specific cultural community. [source]


Disclosure to Parents About Everyday Activities Among American Adolescents From Mexican, Chinese, and European Backgrounds

CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 5 2009
Jenny P. Yau
Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity. [source]


Portrayals of treatment decision-making on popular breast and prostate cancer web sites

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER CARE, Issue 2 2005
C. SEALE bed, phd Article first published online: 14 APR 200
The objective of this study was to describe the messages about treatment decision-making on popular cancer web sites, with particular reference to gender differences. The two most popular UK based web sites for breast and prostate cancer were chosen. Qualitative and quantitative comparative content analysis of the two case study web sites were performed. Web site portrayals of treatment decision-making by men with prostate cancer emphasize the obligation to be decisive, using information derived from medical sources, with minimal consultation with families and friends. Portrayals of treatment decision-making by women with breast cancer emphasize their family obligations, their need to make decisions about matters other than treatment, their right to opt out of decision-making, to take time, sometimes change their minds, consult with families and friends, and thereby take non-medical factors into account. This study will help health care practitioners understand the different factors that men and women feel obliged to consider when making decisions about their cancer treatments, and the role of the Internet in reinforcing gender differences. [source]


Cultural Influences on Immigrant Women's Labor Force Participation: The Arab-American Case,

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW, Issue 1 2004
Jen'nan Ghazal Read
Research on the economic activity of immigrant women has flourished in recent years. The current study extends this literature to examine the labor force activity of Arab-American women, a group whose labor market experiences provide an exception to hitherto accepted theoretical explanations. The employment rates of Arab immigrant women rank among the lowest of any immigrant group, while the rates of native-born Arab-American women resemble those of U.S.-born white women. This study examines potential explanations for these differences using data from the U.S. Census and a national mail survey of Arab-American women. Contrary to findings for other immigrant groups, differences among Arab-American women cannot be explained by their human capital characteristics or family resources, but are almost entirely due to traditional cultural norms that prioritize women's family obligations over their economic activity, and to ethnic and religious social networks that encourage the maintenance of traditional gender roles. This study concludes by underscoring the need for additional research on the impact of culture on immigrant women's employment. [source]


Life-Course Observations of Alcohol Use among Navajo Indians: Natural History or Careers?

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2006
Stephen J. Kunitz
In this article, I describe changes in patterns of alcohol use and abuse among Navajo Indians from the mid-1960s to the late 1990s. The prevalence of alcohol dependence continues to be higher than in the general U.S. population, but remission is also common, as it was in the 1960s and previously. Men have substantially higher rates of alcohol dependence than women. The former engage in heavy drinking largely in response to the heavy drinking of those around them. The latter drink excessively largely as a response to psychiatric disorders, depression, and abuse by a partner or husband. As increasing numbers of people have moved to reservation and border towns, a youth culture has developed in which alcohol use is initiated by teenagers with their peers rather than, as in the past, with older kinsmen. Alcohol use has thus been freed from the constraints imposed by both isolation and family obligations. [source]