Family Networks (family + network)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Family Networks of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Appalachia

CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE, Issue 6 2009
Petr Pancoska Ph.D.
Abstract The prevalence of obesity and diabetes has been studied in adolescent and adult populations in poor, medically underserved rural Appalachia of West Virginia. A web-based questionnaire about obesity and diabetes was obtained in 989 family members of 210 Community Based Clinical Research (CBPR) trained adolescent members of a network of 18 science clubs, incorporating 142 families. After age-correction in < 20 years old, 50% of both adolescents and adults were obese. The frequency distribution of obesity was trimodal. In the overall population 10.4% had type 2 diabetes, while 24% of adult, obese subjects had type 2 diabetes. A new metric, the family diabetes risk potential, identified a trimodal distribution of risk potential. In the lowest most common distribution 43% of families had a diabetic family member. In the intermediate distribution, 69% had a diabetic family member, and in the distribution with highest scores all the families had a diabetic member. In conclusion, the poorest counties of rural Appalachia are at crisis level with the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. The distribution of age-corrected obesity and family diabetes risk potential are not normally distributed. We suggest that targeting individual family units at greatest risk offers the most efficient strategy for ameliorating this epidemic. [source]


A wedding in the family: home making in a global kin network

GLOBAL NETWORKS, Issue 3 2002
Karen Fog Olwig
Rituals such as weddings and funerals are significant for transnational family networks as events where scattered relatives meet and validate shared kinship and common origins. They are particularly important when taking place at a family ,home' that has been a centre of social and economic relations and locus of emotional attachment. This article analyses a wedding on a Caribbean island involving a large global family network, which occurred at a critical point in the family's history. It became an occasion when members asserted their notions of belonging rooted in the ,home', not just as members of a common kin group, but as persons whose life trajectories had involved them in different social, economic and geographical contexts. Individually they had dissimilar interpretations and expectations of their place in the home, and these were played out at the wedding. The gathering allowed a display of family solidarity, but was also a site where differing views of individuals' contribution to the global household were expressed, and rights to belong in the family home and, by implication, the island were contested. [source]


Acceptance and disclosure of HIV status through an integrated community/home-based care program in South Africa

INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 4 2007

Aim:, To report the outcome of a comparative study among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) served by an integrated community/home-based care (ICHC) programme and those who are not in any home-based care programme in terms of acceptance and disclosure of the HIV status. Background:, One of the major challenges in HIV/AIDS care in developing countries is acceptance and disclosure of a positive HIV status by PLWHAs. Denial and non-disclosure of HIV status hinders prevention efforts as well as access to treatment, care and support for PLWHAs. Methods:, Quantitative data were collected in 2004 from a group of PLWHAs served by the ICHC programme and a group that was not receiving any community/home-based care. Data were compared between the two groups in terms of acceptance and disclosure of HIV status. Findings:, The ICHC was effective in improving acceptance and disclosure of the HIV-positive status by PLWHAs in the programme. PLWHAs in the ICHC programme did not find disclosure of their status difficult, and had disclosed their positive HIV status to more people than those who are not in any programme. PLWHAs in the ICHC programme not only disclosed their positive HIV status within their family network and households, but also disclosed to the community in general, sports group, religious groups and other social networks. Conclusions:, Community/home-based care programmes can serve as catalysts for acceptance and disclosure of a positive HIV status by PLWHAs. [source]


Testing the function of attachment hierarchies during emerging adulthood

PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, Issue 2 2010
ROBYN PITMAN
J. Bowlby (1969/1997) suggested that one aspect of healthy development included the shift of attachment functions from parent to peer. This proposal was tested in a sample of undergraduates and results suggested that there was no advantage for individuals with a peer network compared to those with a family network. There was, however, a difference in attachment,distress associations between groups. Consistent with previous research, attachment anxiety was positively associated with distress for both groups. Although attachment avoidance was positively associated with distress for individuals with a predominantly family network, avoidance was not associated with distress for individuals with a predominantly peer network. Discussion highlights two interpretations for these findings, which focus on the importance that attachment may have on the experience of distress as well as current research findings exploring the attachment,distress relationship over time. [source]


War, Livelihoods and Vulnerability in Sri Lanka

DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, Issue 2 2004
Benedikt Korf
As the number of de-stabilized regions of warfare or post-war conditions worldwide continues to grow, this article investigates how civilians survive in the context of a civil war. It analyses livelihood strategies of farmers in the war-torn areas of Sri Lanka, using an analytical framework based on a revised form of DFID's sustainable rural livelihoods approach, placing particular attention on the institutional reproduction of household capital assets in the war economy. The author delineates a three pillar model of household livelihood strategies focusing on how households (1) cope with the increased level of risk and uncertainty; (2) adjust their economic and social household assets for economic survival; and (3) use their social and political assets as livelihood strategies. Empirical evidence comes from four case study villages in the east of Sri Lanka. Although the four case studies were very close together geographically, their livelihood outcomes differed considerably depending on the very specific local political geography. The role of social and political assets is essential: while social assets (extended family networks) were important to absorb migrants, political assets (alliances with power holders) were instrumental in enabling individuals, households or economic actors to stabilize or even expand their livelihood options and opportunities. The author concludes that civilians in conflict situations are not all victims (some may also be culprits in the political economy of warfare), and that war can be both a threat and an opportunity, often at the same time. [source]


Caribbean Transnational Return Migrants as Agents of Change

GEOGRAPHY COMPASS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2007
Dennis Conway
This article challenges several of the firmly held convictions drawn from extant research on return migration to the Caribbean. For many contemporary small island societies undergoing rapid change and transformation, modernization and integration into the wider global economy, today's younger and more youthful return migrants are no longer an ineffective demographic cohort. Despite their numerically small size, many are demonstrating they can be influential "agents of change." No longer merely returning retirees, they are more diverse, in terms of age, life-course transitions, class and gendered social positions, family networks, and migration histories. Multiple identities are the rule, rather than the exception, as returnees of different ages choose to live, work (and play) in island society, to give something back to the island home of their parents or of their youth. Many embrace transnational strategies to live in and between two worlds, or more if their family network's reach is multilocal. [source]


A wedding in the family: home making in a global kin network

GLOBAL NETWORKS, Issue 3 2002
Karen Fog Olwig
Rituals such as weddings and funerals are significant for transnational family networks as events where scattered relatives meet and validate shared kinship and common origins. They are particularly important when taking place at a family ,home' that has been a centre of social and economic relations and locus of emotional attachment. This article analyses a wedding on a Caribbean island involving a large global family network, which occurred at a critical point in the family's history. It became an occasion when members asserted their notions of belonging rooted in the ,home', not just as members of a common kin group, but as persons whose life trajectories had involved them in different social, economic and geographical contexts. Individually they had dissimilar interpretations and expectations of their place in the home, and these were played out at the wedding. The gathering allowed a display of family solidarity, but was also a site where differing views of individuals' contribution to the global household were expressed, and rights to belong in the family home and, by implication, the island were contested. [source]


Caribbean journeys: an ethnography of migration and home in three family networks , By Olwig, Karen Fog

THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 1 2010
Diane Austin-Broos
No abstract is available for this article. [source]