Family Migration (family + migration)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Gender Asymmetry in Family Migration: Occupational Inequality or Interspousal Comparative Advantage?

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2010
Kimberlee A. Shauman
This paper examines gender inequality in the determinants of job-related long-distance migration among married dual-earner couples during the 1980s and 1990s. The analysis tested the structural explanation, which attributes gender asymmetry in family migration to structural inequality in the labor market, and the comparative advantage explanation derived from relative resource theory. The analysis used individual- and family-level data from 5,504 Panel Study of Income Dynamics families, occupation-level data from the 1980,2000 U.S. Decennial Censuses Integrated Public Use Micro Samples, and discrete-time event history models. Gender differences in the determinants of family migration were not explained by gender differences in occupational characteristics, but the results partially support the relative resource theory by illustrating the conditioning influence of interspousal comparative advantage. [source]


Moulding the migrant family

LEGAL STUDIES, Issue 4 2009
Dr Helena Wray
This paper offers a critical perspective on how immigration control regulates the family lives of British residents and nationals of migrant descent. Family migration is problematic for a government determined to restrict long-term immigration to the skilled. The extended or ,corporate' family is particularly problematic because it also causes the reproduction of forms of family life that are regarded as oppressive and a barrier to cohesion. Policies have tended to minimise these forms of migration, and recent changes and proposals are consistent with that. The result is the increased marginalisation or exclusion of some migrants and pressure on migrant family life to conform more closely to majority norms. [source]


Family migration and physical growth in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN BIOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
Hugo Azcorra
Merida city in Yucatan, Mexico, has received rural-to-urban migration for decades, with most immigrants settling in the city's southern neighborhoods. Exposure of immigrants to new environmental and sociocultural conditions can generate biological responses, including changes in physical growth pattern at early age. We performed a study to identify and measure the effects of family migration into south Merida on growth in 4- to 6-year-old children, measuring weight, height, sitting height, and calculated arm muscle and fat areas of 445 children: 228 natives (116 females) and 217 immigrants (118 females) and collecting family social and demographic data. Statistical analysis focused on determining differences in growth, socioeconomic, and biological variables by migratory condition and generating multiple regression models for each growth measurement. No univariate statistical differences (P > 0.05, Student's t- test) were observed in growth between studied children. Multiple regression analyses showed age, sex, mother's height, birth order, birth weight, family income, zone of residence, diet, and febrile episodes had an effect on growth. Neither the migration variable used above nor any other definition of migrant had a significant effect on growth. The lack of differences in growth between immigrant and native children is probably due to similarity in socioeconomic conditions of their families. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2009. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Demographic variation in housing cost adjustments with US family migration

POPULATION, SPACE AND PLACE (PREVIOUSLY:-INT JOURNAL OF POPULATION GEOGRAPHY), Issue 4 2008
Suzanne Davies Withers
Abstract This paper examines the demographic variation in housing-cost adjustment associated with family migration in the United States. The American population continues to migrate away from very large metropolitan areas down the urban hierarchy towards smaller metropolitan and micropolitan areas, an exodus that is frequently attributed to the push effects of diseconomies and congestion, increasing presence of foreign-born population, and housing affordability problems, particularly in the large gateway cities. Yet, there is no empirical study of the housing-cost adjustments associated with migration. This study addresses this gap by empirically assessing whether migration is associated with housing affordability adjustments, whether migrating families increase or decrease their housing costs, whether demographic variations occur in these adjustments, and whether there are significant differences in the geographies of housing-cost adjustments among migrant families. These questions are addressed using the Census 2000 county-to-county migration flows merged with Census measures, and the 2000 Public Use Micro-Sample 5% National file. The results indicate significant changes in housing costs associated with migration, and interstate migration in particular. On average, the direction of migration is to more affordable places. Families migrating from the traditional gateway cities with a relatively high percentage of foreign-born populations are the most likely to make enormous shifts in affordability. However, these moves do not correspond neatly with regional white-flight theory. Hispanics are far more likely to decrease housing costs with migration, as are non-citizens and naturalised citizens. This research makes an important contribution to debates within the family migration literature, including conjectures of regional white flight and gendered theories of migration. Family migration towards greater housing affordability appears strategic and embedded in larger issues of family work,life balance. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Morocco's Migration Experience: A Transitional Perspective1

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, Issue 4 2007
Hein De Haas
ABSTRACT Using a ,transitional' perspective on migration, which combines three theoretical approaches on dynamic development-migration linkages, this paper interprets the evolution of migration within, from, and to Morocco over the twentieth century. Colonization and the incorporation of rural areas, along with a certain level of socio-economic development, have spurred internal and international wage labour migration both within Morocco and from Morocco to Europe. Migration seems to be the result of development rather than the lack of development. Populations from highly marginalized regions were less likely to participate in migration than populations from the three, moderately enclosed "migration belts" which had established traditions of pre-modern, largely circular migration. At the onset of large-scale emigration in the 1960s, the spatial patterns of labour migration were significantly infuenced by colonial bonds with Spain and France, selective labour recruitment, and Moroccan selective passport issuance policies. However, the influence of such policies rapidly decreased due to the effects of migration-facilitating networks. Increasingly restrictive policies coincided with a growing reliance on family migration, permanent settlement, undocumented migration, and the exploration of new migration itineraries, and had no success in reducing migration levels. Alongside patterns of decentralizing internal migration, a spatial diffusion of international out-migration has expanded beyond the historical migration belts in response to new labour opportunities in southern Europe. Persistent demand for migrant labour, along with demographic factors and increasing aspirations, suggest that migration over formally closed borders is likely to remain high in the near future. However, in the longer term, out-migration might decrease and Morocco could increasingly develop into a migration destination for migrants from sub-Saharan Africa, a transition process which may already have een set in motion. [source]


Gender Asymmetry in Family Migration: Occupational Inequality or Interspousal Comparative Advantage?

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2010
Kimberlee A. Shauman
This paper examines gender inequality in the determinants of job-related long-distance migration among married dual-earner couples during the 1980s and 1990s. The analysis tested the structural explanation, which attributes gender asymmetry in family migration to structural inequality in the labor market, and the comparative advantage explanation derived from relative resource theory. The analysis used individual- and family-level data from 5,504 Panel Study of Income Dynamics families, occupation-level data from the 1980,2000 U.S. Decennial Censuses Integrated Public Use Micro Samples, and discrete-time event history models. Gender differences in the determinants of family migration were not explained by gender differences in occupational characteristics, but the results partially support the relative resource theory by illustrating the conditioning influence of interspousal comparative advantage. [source]


Family migration and physical growth in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN BIOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
Hugo Azcorra
Merida city in Yucatan, Mexico, has received rural-to-urban migration for decades, with most immigrants settling in the city's southern neighborhoods. Exposure of immigrants to new environmental and sociocultural conditions can generate biological responses, including changes in physical growth pattern at early age. We performed a study to identify and measure the effects of family migration into south Merida on growth in 4- to 6-year-old children, measuring weight, height, sitting height, and calculated arm muscle and fat areas of 445 children: 228 natives (116 females) and 217 immigrants (118 females) and collecting family social and demographic data. Statistical analysis focused on determining differences in growth, socioeconomic, and biological variables by migratory condition and generating multiple regression models for each growth measurement. No univariate statistical differences (P > 0.05, Student's t- test) were observed in growth between studied children. Multiple regression analyses showed age, sex, mother's height, birth order, birth weight, family income, zone of residence, diet, and febrile episodes had an effect on growth. Neither the migration variable used above nor any other definition of migrant had a significant effect on growth. The lack of differences in growth between immigrant and native children is probably due to similarity in socioeconomic conditions of their families. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2009. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Demographic variation in housing cost adjustments with US family migration

POPULATION, SPACE AND PLACE (PREVIOUSLY:-INT JOURNAL OF POPULATION GEOGRAPHY), Issue 4 2008
Suzanne Davies Withers
Abstract This paper examines the demographic variation in housing-cost adjustment associated with family migration in the United States. The American population continues to migrate away from very large metropolitan areas down the urban hierarchy towards smaller metropolitan and micropolitan areas, an exodus that is frequently attributed to the push effects of diseconomies and congestion, increasing presence of foreign-born population, and housing affordability problems, particularly in the large gateway cities. Yet, there is no empirical study of the housing-cost adjustments associated with migration. This study addresses this gap by empirically assessing whether migration is associated with housing affordability adjustments, whether migrating families increase or decrease their housing costs, whether demographic variations occur in these adjustments, and whether there are significant differences in the geographies of housing-cost adjustments among migrant families. These questions are addressed using the Census 2000 county-to-county migration flows merged with Census measures, and the 2000 Public Use Micro-Sample 5% National file. The results indicate significant changes in housing costs associated with migration, and interstate migration in particular. On average, the direction of migration is to more affordable places. Families migrating from the traditional gateway cities with a relatively high percentage of foreign-born populations are the most likely to make enormous shifts in affordability. However, these moves do not correspond neatly with regional white-flight theory. Hispanics are far more likely to decrease housing costs with migration, as are non-citizens and naturalised citizens. This research makes an important contribution to debates within the family migration literature, including conjectures of regional white flight and gendered theories of migration. Family migration towards greater housing affordability appears strategic and embedded in larger issues of family work,life balance. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Housing costs and the geography of family migration outcomes

POPULATION, SPACE AND PLACE (PREVIOUSLY:-INT JOURNAL OF POPULATION GEOGRAPHY), Issue 4 2006
Suzanne Davies Withers
Abstract This paper takes a geographical approach towards assessing the ,returns' to family migration by addressing explicitly the impacts of differences in the cost of housing between the place of origin and place of destination for family migrants. While numerous studies have examined differences in labour-force participation and wages subsequent to migration, particularly on the part of wives, few studies have considered the local housing and labour market contexts of these events. This study examines the adjusted earnings outcomes resulting from migration for husbands, wives and families in the United States in the context of local housing costs. Our findings challenge the assumption of simple economic gains and instead indicate that who gains and who loses from family migration is quite complex. The geographical context of family migration is critical in determining gains and losses, and is interrelated with moves in and out of the labour market on the part of wives. Our research indicates that wives who leave the labour market after a move are very likely to have moved to a more affordable housing market. Conversely, wives are found to enter the labour market when the move is to a more expensive housing market. For this group, wives' earnings considerably mitigate the impact on overall family earnings. This paper provides an important contribution to understanding family migration by positioning the analysis of migration outcomes within the context of labour markets and local housing market costs. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Balancing move and work: women's labour market exits and entries after family migration

POPULATION, SPACE AND PLACE (PREVIOUSLY:-INT JOURNAL OF POPULATION GEOGRAPHY), Issue 1 2006
William A. V. Clark
Abstract A substantial literature has examined the nature of mobility and migration and the link to workforce participation. In general that literature has documented the disadvantages to women who move or migrate with a partner during the mobility or migration process, but it suggests, especially for the US, that the disadvantage is temporarily limited. This study of the same process in the British labour market reaffirms a temporary deficit-effect of two-worker migration for women, but unlike the US labour market the process of re-entry seems slower. There are modest monetary gains from mobility and migration, but these gains come for some families only when women enter the labour force after migration. The study reconfirms the importance of gender in the migration and mobility processes. Income, for women, recovers more slowly if a birth was registered in the migration interval. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]