Family Interventions (family + intervention)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Reflections on the Challenges of Effective Dissemination of Behavioural Family Intervention: Our Experience with the Triple P , Positive Parenting Program

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2005
Matthew R. Sanders
This paper draws on learnings from dissemination and diffusion research to discuss predictors of dissemination outcomes, obstacles to effective dissemination, and phases of dissemination failure. A model is presented of effective dissemination of a multilevel system of intervention known as the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program (Triple P). This model takes a systems-contextual approach, addressing program design, skills training, practitioner confidence and self-regulation, and workplace support. Recommendations are made for agencies adopting evidence-based programs, particularly in relation to the selection, establishment and maintenance of new programs as well as guiding ongoing program development. Future directions for research into the dissemination of evidence-based practice are also discussed. [source]


The evolution of family interventions for schizophrenia.

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2006
A tribute to Gianfranco Cecchin
Family intervention for schizophrenia has informed the whole history of family therapy, although in different fashions. This presentation will deal with the main phases of such intervention, outlining the characteristic features of each one. We can roughly divide the history of family intervention for schizophrenia into four phases: Phase 1 , Conjoint family therapy (1955,1965). Family interventions were aimed at modifying family communication patterns, implying the possibility of a definitive resolution of psychopathology. Phase 2 , Antipsychiatry (1965,1975). This, rather than a treatment model, was a philosophy of psychiatry, which considered schizophrenia as an epiphenomenon of the distortions of Western society. Family treatment was aimed at promoting the awareness of such a dynamic. Phase 3 , Milan systemic therapy (1975,1985). The systemic model was aimed at helping people with schizophrenia to recognize their position within their families (and other significant systems), giving all family members a new sense of their relationships to each other. Phase 4 , Psychoeducation (1985,2005). In most psychoeducational models, schizophrenia was conceived of as a biologically determined disorder. Psychoeducation was a way of helping the not diagnosed family members to cope with problems brought about by the illness, eliciting consensus towards psychiatric treatments such as medication and rehabilitation. A fifth phase of family intervention for schizophrenia is probably developing right now. If this is happening it should probably be an integrative phase, in which different approaches to family dynamics might be bridged and blended, in order to give more effective help to all members of families with schizophrenia. [source]


Understanding families in their own context: schizophrenia and structural family therapy in Beijing

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 3 2002
Lawrence Hsin Yang
Evidence from a number of family intervention strategies demonstrates a beneficial impact on the course of schizophrenia. It appears that different family interventions have generic features that aid the patient to avoid relapse and improve functioning. A significant challenge for researchers is to modify these generic strategies to be sensitive to different cultural groups in order to ensure their effectiveness. Chinese culture, with its distinct cultural norms governing family interaction and intense stigma towards the mentally ill, would seem to raise a particular challenge. This paper offers an account of an eclectic model of structural family therapy that incorporates psychoeducation and behavioural treatments for schizophrenia as a theoretical guide to working in a cross,cultural context. A Beijing family, consisting of parents and their daughter with schizophrenia, were seen for sixteen months during a trial of family intervention in China. Through structural family concepts, China's sociocultural context of treatment resource constraints, population policy and stigma are examined and the impact of the illness on family organization is explored. [source]


Balancing Work and Family: A Controlled Evaluation of the Triple P- Positive Parenting Program as a Work-Site Intervention

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2003
Alicia J. Martin
Background: Despite a wealth of evidence showing that behavioural family intervention is an effective intervention for parents of children with behavioural and emotional problems, little attention has been given to the relationship between parents functioning at work and their capacity to manage parenting and other home responsibilities. This study evaluated the effects of a group version of the Triple-P Positive Parenting Program (WPTP) designed specifically for delivery in the workplace. Method: Participants were 42 general and academic staff from a major metropolitan university who were reporting difficulties managing home and work responsibilities and behavioural difficulties with their children. Participants were randomly assigned to WPTP, or to a waitlist control (WL) condition. Results: Following intervention, parents in WPTP reported significantly lower levels of disruptive child behaviour, dysfunctional parenting practices, and higher levels of parental self-efficacy in managing both home and work responsibilities, than parents in the WL condition. These short-term improvements were maintained at 4-months follow-up. There were also additional improvements in reported levels of work stress and parental distress at follow-up in the WPTP group compared to post-intervention. Conclusions: Implications for the development of ,family-friendly' work environments and the prevention of child behaviour problems are discussed. [source]


Psychoeducational intervention for caregivers of Indian patients with schizophrenia: a randomised-controlled trial

ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 6 2009
P. Kulhara
Objective:, There are hardly any randomised-controlled trials of structured family interventions for schizophrenia from India. This study attempted to evaluate the impact of a structured psychoeducational intervention for schizophrenia, compared with standard out-patient treatment, on various patient- and caregiver-related parameters. Method:, Seventy-six patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia and their caregivers were randomly allocated to receive either a structured psychoeducational intervention (n = 38) consisting of monthly sessions for 9 months or ,routine' out-patient care (n = 38) for the same duration. Psychopathology was assessed on monthly basis. Disability levels, caregiver-burden, caregiver-coping, caregiver-support and caregiver-satisfaction were evaluated at baseline and upon completion. Results:, Structured psychoeducational intervention was significantly better than routine out-patient care on several indices including psychopathology, disability, caregiver-support and caregiver-satisfaction. The psychoeducational intervention package used was simple, feasible and not costly. Conclusion:, Structured psychoeducational intervention is a viable option for treatment of schizophrenia even in developing countries like India. [source]


The role of the family in preventing and intervening with substance use and misuse: a comprehensive review of family interventions, with a focus on young people

DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, Issue 2 2005
RICHARD D. B. VELLEMAN PhD
Abstract The family plays a key part in both preventing and intervening with substance use and misuse, both through inducing risk, and/or encouraging and promoting protection and resilience. This review examines a number of family processes and structures that have been associated with young people commencing substance use and later misuse, and concludes that there is significant evidence for family involvement in young people's taking up, and later misusing, substances. Given this family involvement, the review explores and appraises interventions aimed at using the family to prevent substance use and misuse amongst young people. The review concludes that there is a dearth of methodologically highly sound research in this area, but the research that has been conducted does suggest strongly that the family can have a central role in preventing substance use and later misuse amongst young people. [source]


Cultural Variability in the Manifestation of Expressed Emotion

FAMILY PROCESS, Issue 2 2009
STEVEN R. LÓPEZ PH.D.
We examined the distribution of expressed emotion (EE) and its indices in a sample of 224 family caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia pooled from 5 studies, 3 reflecting a contemporary sample of Mexican Americans (MA 2000, N=126), 1 of an earlier study of Mexican Americans (MA 1980, N=44), and the other of an earlier study of Anglo Americans (AA, N=54). Chi-square and path analyses revealed no significant differences between the 2 MA samples in rates of high EE, critical comments, hostility, and emotional over-involvement (EOI). Only caregiver warmth differed for the 2 MA samples; MA 1980 had higher warmth than MA 2000. Significant differences were consistently found between the combined MA samples and the AA sample; AAs had higher rates of high EE, more critical comments, less warmth, less EOI, and a high EE profile comprised more of criticism/hostility. We also examined the relationship of proxy measures of acculturation among the MA 2000 sample. The findings support and extend Jenkins' earlier observations regarding the cultural variability of EE for Mexican Americans. Implications are discussed regarding the cross-cultural measurement of EE and the focus of family interventions. RESUMEN Examinamos la distribución de emoción expresada y sus índices en una muestra de 224 cuidadores parientes de personas con esquizofrenia tomadas de 5 estudios, tres que reflejaban una muestra contemporánea de personas méxico-estadounidenses (ME 2000, N=126), una de un estudio anterior de méxico-estadounidenses (ME 1980, N=44, Karno et al., 1987) y la otra de un estudio anterior de angloamericanos (AA, N=54, Vaughn et al., 1984). La distribución ji-cuadrado y los análisis de pautas no revelaron diferencias significativas entre las dos muestras de méxico-estadounidenses en cuanto a los índices de alta emoción expresada, comentarios críticos, hostilidad y sobreimplicación emocional. Solo la calidez de los cuidadores fue distinta en las dos muestras de méxico-estadounidenses; el grupo ME 1980 demostró mayor calidez que el grupo ME 2000. Se encontraron sistemáticamente diferencias considerables entre las dos muestras de méxico-estadounidenses y la muestra de angloamericanos; los angloamericanos demostraron índices más altos de alta emoción expresada, más comentarios críticos, menos calidez, menos sobreimplicación emocional y un perfil de alta emoción expresada compuesto mayormente por crítica y hostilidad. También examinamos la relación de los cálculos aproximados de aculturación entre la muestra ME 2000. Los resultados respaldan y amplían las observaciones anteriores de Jenkins (1991) con respecto a la variabilidad cultural de emoción expresada en los méxico-estadounidenses. Se comentan las implicaciones con respecto a la evaluación intercultural de emoción expresada y al enfoque de las intervenciones familiares. Palabras clave: Emoción expresada, cultura, méxico-estadounidenses, sobreimplicación emocional, esquizofrenia, cuidadores parientes [source]


Genetic Probes of Three Theories of Maternal Adjustment: I. Recent Evidence and a Model,

FAMILY PROCESS, Issue 3 2001
David Reiss M.D.
Studies focusing on genetic and social influences on maternal adjustment will illumine mother's marriage, parenting, and the development of psychopathology in her children. Recent behavioral genetic research suggests mechanisms by which genetic and social influences determine psychological development and adjustment. First, heritable, personal attributes may influence individuals' relationships with their family members. These genetically influenced family patterns may amplify the effects of adverse, heritable personal attributes on adjustment. Second, influences unique to siblings may be the most important environmental determinants of adjustment. We derive three hypotheses on maternal adjustment from integrating these findings from genetic studies with other contemporary research on maternal adjustment. First, mother's marriage mediates the influence of her heritable, personal attributes on her adjustment. Second, mother's recall of how she was parented is partially genetically influenced, and both her relationships with her spouse and her child mediate the impact of these genetically influenced representations on her current adjustment. Third, characteristics of mother's spouse are important influences on difference between her adjustment and that of her sister's These sibling-specific influences are unrelated to mother's heritable attributes. The current article develops this model, and the companion article describes the Twin Mom Study that was designed to test it as well, as its first findings. Data from this study can illumine the role of family process in the expression of genetic influence and lead to specific family interventions designed to offset adverse genetic influences. [source]


An Exemplar of the Use of NNN Language in Developing Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 1 2008
CRRN-A, Donald D. Kautz PhD
PURPOSE. To explore the use of standardized language, NNN, in the development of evidence-based practice (EBP). DATA SOURCES. Published research and texts on family interventions, nursing diagnoses (NANDA-I), nursing interventions (NIC), and nursing outcomes (NOC). DATA ANALYSIS. Research literature was summarized and synthesized to determine levels of evidence for the NIC intervention Family Integrity Promotion. CONCLUSIONS. The authors advocate that a "standards of practice" category of levels of evidence be adopted for interventions not amenable to randomized controlled trials or for which a body of research has not been developed. Priorities for nursing family intervention research are identified. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE. The use of NANDA-I nursing diagnoses, NIC interventions, and NOC outcomes (NNN language) as research frameworks will facilitate the development of EBP guidelines and the use of appropriate outcome measures. [source]


Adaptation and negotiation as an approach to care in paediatric diabetes specialist nursing practice: a critical review

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 4 2002
MARIE MARSHALL BSc
,,Considerable attention has been given to diabetes care in children. However, nursing practice may be guided by biomedical models. ,,Diabetes care in children should focus on family-centred approaches arguably based in the community. ,,Psychosocial constructs have an important role in the development of self-management of chronic illness in children. ,,Paediatric diabetes nurse specialists are pivotal in facilitating family-centred care based on personal models of child and family interventions. [source]


Early impact of the BEST intervention for parents stressed by adolescent substance abuse

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY & APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2001
John W. Toumbourou
Abstract Youth involvement in substance abuse can be a source of considerable distress for their parents. Unilateral family interventions have been advocated as one means by which concerned family members can be supported to assist substance-abusing family members. To date there has been little research examining the impact of unilateral family interventions on the directly participating family members. In this study the early impact of an 8-week parent-group programme known as Behavioural Exchange Systems Training (BEST) was evaluated using a quasi-experimental, waiting list control design. The professionally led programme had been developed to support and assist parents in their efforts to cope with adolescent substance abuse. Subjects were 66 parents (48 families) accepted for entry into the programme between 1997 and 1998. Comparison was made between 46 parents offered immediate entry into the programme and 20 parents whose entry to the programme was delayed by an 8-week waiting list. At the first assessment 87% of parents showed elevated mental health symptoms on the General Health Questionnaire. Evidence suggested exposure to the intervention had a positive impact on parents. Compared to parents on the waiting list, parents entered immediately into the intervention demonstrated greater reductions in mental health symptoms, increased parental satisfaction, and increased use of assertive parenting behaviours. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The evolution of family interventions for schizophrenia.

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2006
A tribute to Gianfranco Cecchin
Family intervention for schizophrenia has informed the whole history of family therapy, although in different fashions. This presentation will deal with the main phases of such intervention, outlining the characteristic features of each one. We can roughly divide the history of family intervention for schizophrenia into four phases: Phase 1 , Conjoint family therapy (1955,1965). Family interventions were aimed at modifying family communication patterns, implying the possibility of a definitive resolution of psychopathology. Phase 2 , Antipsychiatry (1965,1975). This, rather than a treatment model, was a philosophy of psychiatry, which considered schizophrenia as an epiphenomenon of the distortions of Western society. Family treatment was aimed at promoting the awareness of such a dynamic. Phase 3 , Milan systemic therapy (1975,1985). The systemic model was aimed at helping people with schizophrenia to recognize their position within their families (and other significant systems), giving all family members a new sense of their relationships to each other. Phase 4 , Psychoeducation (1985,2005). In most psychoeducational models, schizophrenia was conceived of as a biologically determined disorder. Psychoeducation was a way of helping the not diagnosed family members to cope with problems brought about by the illness, eliciting consensus towards psychiatric treatments such as medication and rehabilitation. A fifth phase of family intervention for schizophrenia is probably developing right now. If this is happening it should probably be an integrative phase, in which different approaches to family dynamics might be bridged and blended, in order to give more effective help to all members of families with schizophrenia. [source]


Understanding families in their own context: schizophrenia and structural family therapy in Beijing

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 3 2002
Lawrence Hsin Yang
Evidence from a number of family intervention strategies demonstrates a beneficial impact on the course of schizophrenia. It appears that different family interventions have generic features that aid the patient to avoid relapse and improve functioning. A significant challenge for researchers is to modify these generic strategies to be sensitive to different cultural groups in order to ensure their effectiveness. Chinese culture, with its distinct cultural norms governing family interaction and intense stigma towards the mentally ill, would seem to raise a particular challenge. This paper offers an account of an eclectic model of structural family therapy that incorporates psychoeducation and behavioural treatments for schizophrenia as a theoretical guide to working in a cross,cultural context. A Beijing family, consisting of parents and their daughter with schizophrenia, were seen for sixteen months during a trial of family intervention in China. Through structural family concepts, China's sociocultural context of treatment resource constraints, population policy and stigma are examined and the impact of the illness on family organization is explored. [source]


Evaluating A Multiple-Family Group Access Intervention for Refugees with PTSD

JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 2 2008
Stevan Weine
The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a multiple-family group in increasing access to mental health services for refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study investigated a nine-session multiple-family group called Coffee and Families Education and Support with refugee families from Bosnia-Herzegovina in Chicago. Adults with PTSD (n = 197) and their families were randomly assigned to receive either the intervention or a control condition. The results indicated that a multiple-family group was effective in increasing access to mental health services and that depression and family comfort with discussing trauma mediated the intervention effect. Further well-designed studies of family interventions are needed for developing evidence-based interventions for refugee families. [source]


Preventing Pediatric Obesity: Assessment and Management in the Primary Care Setting

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 2 2002
FAANP, Lorna Schumann PhD
Purpose To review the literature on and discuss the role of the primary care provider in assessing and managing overweight children before they become obese. Data Sources Selected research, national guidelines and recommendations, and the professional experience of the authors. Conclusions The focus of primary care involves early detectionand family interventions that are designed for lifestyle modifications, specifically for improved nutrition and an increase in regular physical activity, to achieve optimal child health. Early identification and management of children who exceed a healthy weight for height, gender, and age will prevent the increasing incidence of pediatric obesity. Early prevention and management of pediatric overweight and obesity will also decrease the potential for associated medical and psychosocial problems. Implications For Practice Pediatric obesity has risen dramatically in the United States during the last two decades; it is a significant child health problem that is preventable and largely under-diagnosed and under-treated. It is essential to discuss prevention of obesity with parents at every well-child visit; treatment should be initiated when patterns of weight gain exceed established percentiles for increasing height for age and gender. [source]


Psychological therapies for bipolar disorder: the role of model-driven approaches to therapy integration

BIPOLAR DISORDERS, Issue 1 2005
Steven H Jones
Objectives:, The psychological and social aspects of bipolar disorder are receiving increasing recognition. Recently, there have been promising developments in psychological interventions, but there is scope for further improvement of therapeutic outcomes. This paper argues for the use of more detailed psychological models of bipolar disorder to inform the further development of therapeutic approaches. Method:, Evidence for psychological, family and social factors in bipolar disorder is reviewed. The efficacy of current individual and family interventions are discussed. A model, which has potential to synthesize group and individual approaches, is outlined. Results:, Psychological, social and family factors have important influences on the onset, course and outcome of bipolar disorder. Interventions based on vulnerability stress models have proved effective. However, to enhance efficacy future developments need to be based on models that integrate current understandings of the multiple levels at which mood fluctuations occur. A particular recent model is discussed which leads to specific proposals for future intervention research. Conclusions:, Psychological and family approaches to BD have much potential. They clearly have a role in conjunction with appropriate pharmacological treatment. If this potential is to be fully realized future developments need to be based on psychological models that can accommodate the complexity of this illness. [source]


The Triple P-Positive Parenting Programme: a universal population-level approach to the prevention of child abuse

CHILD ABUSE REVIEW, Issue 3 2003
Matthew R. Sanders
Abstract The Triple P-Positive Parenting Programme is described as an example of an evidence-based universal parenting initiative that provides a tiered continuum of interventions of increasing strength but narrowing reach in an effort to make parenting programmes more accessible to parents. Interventions within the system range from the use of the media and brief messages to intensive family interventions for parents where parenting problems are complicated by multiple additional sources of family adversity. Several issues concerning the role of training and organizational factors that influence the successful uptake and implementation of the programme are discussed. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A systematic narrative review of the studies on structured child-centred interventions for families with a parent with cancer

PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, Issue 5 2010
Mika Niemelä
Abstract Objective: To perform a systematic narrative review of the current state of published articles on the structured interventions targeted at children with a parent suffering from cancer. Methods: The study was based on a narrative synthesis approach. Eleven structured child-centred intervention studies were systematically searched through PubMed, PsycINFO and MEDLINE. The interventions were grouped into two main categories: ,structured family interventions' and ,structured peer group interventions'. Special attention was focused on the preventive purpose of the interventions. Results: The participants (children, parents and health professionals) reported several positive impacts of interventions on children's and parents' psychosocial well-being, although no improvement or changes were also observed. The effect of interventions on the children was evaluated by structured methods only in five studies. Conclusions: This review showed the lack of valid psychosocial preventive intervention methods focusing on children with parental cancer and highlighted the need of intervention research with controlled study designs and long follow-up periods. However, an intervention method should be easy to train and applicable to the clinical practice of healthcare professionals. By refining the practice-based experiences with scientific research evidence it is possible to move to the next level in providing psychosocial support and prevention for children living in families with parental cancer. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Appraisal of the cancer experience by older long-term survivors

PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
Karen F. Bowman
Cancer survivorship is best viewed as a process that continues across the life span. Appraisals of cancer change over time and may not be explicit until long after treatment completion. The current study, using the Lazarus and Folkman (1984) stress-appraisal-coping framework, explored factors related to both a stressful and an irrelevant appraisal of the cancer experience by older long-term survivors. Hierarchical regression analysis investigated the individual and cumulative effects of person factors (survivors' demographic characteristics, beliefs about the effect of cancer on family members) and situation factors (characteristics of cancer) on survivors' appraisals that cancer was a stressful life event. The strongest correlates of the stress appraisal were person factors. A more stressful appraisal was associated with: (1) the belief that diagnosis/treatment caused greater family distress, (2) being younger, and (3) being White. The irrelevant appraisal had a marginally significant correlate in bivariate analysis and was not included in regression analysis. Implications for health-care professionals and patient/family interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]