Family Impact (family + impact)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A pilot study on the use of wet wraps in infants with moderate atopic eczema

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL DERMATOLOGY, Issue 4 2004
P. E. Beattie
Summary Wet wrap therapy (WWT) is a well-established treatment for severe atopic dermatitis (AD). However little evidence exists to justify widespread use in the community for less severe eczema. We compared the efficacy of WWT with a standard regime of hydrocortisone, to control moderate AD in children. We carried out a single-observer, randomized, controlled pilot study in 19 children under 5 years of age, with AD of 30% or more body surface area, using only 1% hydrocortisone (HC) prior to the study. Group one applied HC once in the morning for 2 weeks, with wet wraps twice daily for week 1, but only at night for week 2. Group two applied HC twice daily without wet wraps. Both applied emollient twice daily and as necessary. The primary outcome measure was the Six Area, Six Sign Atopic Dermatitis (SASSAD) severity score, and the secondary outcome measures were the Infants Dermatology Quality of Life Index (IDQOL), the Dermatitis Family Impact (DFI) score and the weight of topical steroids and emollients used. Over the 2-week active therapy period the mean fall in SASSAD was 8 [95% confidence interval (CI), ,18 to +2; P = 0.11] more in the non-WWT group, the median change in the IDQOL was 2 for Group one and 7 for Group two (95% CI for difference, ,10 to +3; P = 0.24) and the median change in DFI score was 2 for Group one and 5 for Group two (95% CI for difference, ,14 to +2; P = 0.42). This small study has shown that conventional therapy with HC and emollients alone is as effective as WWT for infants with moderately severe, widespread AD, and provides weak evidence to suggest that it may be more effective. We would not advocate routine use of WWT for moderate eczema without further evaluation. [source]


The Family Impact of Atopic Dermatitis in Children: The Role of the Parent Caregiver

PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
Rajesh Balkrishnan Ph.D.
We conducted a cross-sectional, exploratory analysis of how parent caregivers are affected by their child's AD, and how certain parent caregiver characteristics and perceptions affect the family impact of this condition. Parent caregivers of children with AD (n = 49) were administered a survey to collect detailed data on socioeconomic status, health perceptions, and caregiving issues. Family impact of the child's AD was measured using a modified AD Family Impact Scale. Multiple regression analyses revealed that three major factors associated with the parent caregiver were correlated with large increases in the family impact scores: 1) perception that the child's condition is severe (13%, p < 0.01), 2) high use of nonmedical services for child's condition (21%, p < 0.01), and 3) financial concern about the child's condition (18%, p < 0.01). These preliminary data indicate distinct characteristics of the parent caregiver that are associated with higher family impact of AD in children. These parent caregiver factors may be important in identifying suitable audiences and areas for education for optimal management of children's AD. [source]


Expressed Emotion about children: reliability and validity of a Camberwell Family Interview for Childhood (CFI-C)

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue 1 2000
Adolescent Psychiatry, Stephen Scott Senior Lecturer in Child
Abstract A Camberwell Family Interview for Childhood (CFI-C) was developed by adding questions about the family impact of the child's problems to a semi-structured interview on child psychiatric symptoms. The whole CFI-C took under an hour to administer; the questions about family impact added 15,20 minutes. The inter-rater reliability was good (kappa 0.64,1.0). Mothers of 25 boys aged four to nine years referred with disruptive behaviour, and 25 matched controls were interviewed twice in five months. Test-retest stability was fair to good (kappa 0.36,1.0). Discriminant validity between referred and control samples was strong for critical comments, positive comments and warmth, but not significant for emotional overinvolvement or hostility. The same three scales showed strong discriminant validity between child symptom domains, being strongly correlated with conduct symptoms (kappa = 0.49,0.71) but not emotional symptoms (kappa = 0.10,0.17). Sensitivity to change with treatment was shown by a reduction in the mean number of critical comments from 4.7 to 2.9, an increase in positive comments from 2.3 to 3.9, and an increased score on the warmth scale from 2.1 to 2.6. The CFI-C is a useful instrument for the study of the relationship between parenting style and child psychiatric symptoms. Copyright 2000 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


Syndrome specificity and behavioural disorders in young adults with intellectual disability: cultural differences in family impact

JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 3 2006
J. Blacher
Background This study examined whether behaviour problems and adaptive behaviour of low functioning young adults, and well-being of their families, varied by diagnostic syndrome [intellectual disability (ID) only, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism], as well as by cultural group. Methods Behaviour disorders in young adults with moderate to severe ID were assessed from information provided by 282 caregivers during in-home interviews. The sample consisted of 150 Anglo participants, and 132 Latino, primarily Spanish-speaking, participants drawn from Southern California. Results Behaviour disorders and maternal well-being showed the same pattern across disability syndromes. Autism was associated with the highest scores in multiple behaviour problem areas as well as maternal reports of lower well-being. Down syndrome was associated with the lowest behaviour problem scores and the highest maternal well-being. When behaviour problems were controlled for, diagnostic groups accounted for no additional variance in maternal stress or depression. The pattern of behaviour problems and well-being did not differ by sample (Anglo vs. Latino), although level on well-being measures did. Latina mothers reported significantly higher depression symptoms and lower morale, but also higher positive impact from their child than did Anglo mothers. Conclusions Caregivers of young adults with autism report more maladaptive behaviour problems and lower personal well-being, or stress, relative to other diagnostic groups, regardless of cultural group. However, cultural differences exist in caregiver reports of depression, morale, and positive perceptions. Implications for service provision aimed at families of children with challenging behaviour problems are discussed in the context of culture. [source]


Family, demographic and illness-related determinants of HRQL in children with brain tumours in the first year after diagnosis,

PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER, Issue 6 2009
Anthony Penn MBBCh, MRCPCH
Abstract Aims To evaluate the relationship between parent- and child-report Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) and demographic, tumour and family variables in children with a brain tumour in the first year after diagnosis and to identify determinants of HRQL at 12 months. Procedure Longitudinal prospective study: Semi-structured interviews took place approximately 1, 6 and 12 months after diagnosis. HRQL was measured using the self- and parent-report PedsQL 4.0 Total Scale Score. Tumour and treatment variables considered included tumour site and grade, hydrocephalus at diagnosis, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Family variables included measures of family function, family support and family stress, the primary carer's coping strategies and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Univariate analyses were used at all three time points, and to identify potential early predictors of HRQL at 1 year. Regression analysis was then used to identify the most important determinants of HRQL at 1 year. Results Thirty-five patients completed the 12-month interviews. There were consistent significant negative correlations between concurrent family impact of illness and parent and self-report HRQL, and positive correlations between concurrent family support and parent-report HRQL. Treatment with radio- or chemotherapy correlated with child-report HRQL only at some time points. Multivariate analysis showed infratentorial tumour site, and poor HRQL at 1 month best predicted poor self- and parent-report HRQL at 12 months. Conclusion Children with infratentorial tumours and poor HRQL early after diagnosis tend to have poor HRQL at 1 year. While family factors are important modulators of concurrent HRQL, they do not appear important in predicting HRQL. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2009;53:1092,1099. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


The Family Impact of Atopic Dermatitis in Children: The Role of the Parent Caregiver

PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
Rajesh Balkrishnan Ph.D.
We conducted a cross-sectional, exploratory analysis of how parent caregivers are affected by their child's AD, and how certain parent caregiver characteristics and perceptions affect the family impact of this condition. Parent caregivers of children with AD (n = 49) were administered a survey to collect detailed data on socioeconomic status, health perceptions, and caregiving issues. Family impact of the child's AD was measured using a modified AD Family Impact Scale. Multiple regression analyses revealed that three major factors associated with the parent caregiver were correlated with large increases in the family impact scores: 1) perception that the child's condition is severe (13%, p < 0.01), 2) high use of nonmedical services for child's condition (21%, p < 0.01), and 3) financial concern about the child's condition (18%, p < 0.01). These preliminary data indicate distinct characteristics of the parent caregiver that are associated with higher family impact of AD in children. These parent caregiver factors may be important in identifying suitable audiences and areas for education for optimal management of children's AD. [source]


Quality of life, health satisfaction and family impact on caregivers of children with developmental delays

CHILD: CARE, HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 2 2009
R. L. Hsieh
Abstract Objective To study the quality of life, health satisfaction and family impact on caregivers of children with developmental delays in Taiwan. Design Cross-sectional study. Subjects The caregivers of children with diagnoses of developmental delays recruited from a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. Methods The main caregivers of 48 male and 22 female children with developmental delays were recruited. WHOQOL-BREF for health-related quality of life (HRQOL), PedsQL-Health Satisfaction for health satisfaction, PedsQL-Family Impact Module and Impact on Family Scale for family impact were evaluated. The correlation of caregivers' HRQOL, health satisfaction and family impact were also studied. Results Caregivers in nuclear families had higher health satisfaction scores (78.2 for nuclear families vs. 66.9 for extended families, P < 0.05) when assessed by the PedQL-Health Satisfaction questionnaire. Children's age was negatively correlated with family impact, including parent (,0.272, P = 0.023), family (,0.262, P = 0.029) and total scores (,0.281, P = 0.018) as assessed using the PedsQL-Family Impact Module. Conclusion A negative relation between impact of burden and child's age suggests that family members gradually adapt to the delayed developmental status in their children as they grow. Caregivers in nuclear families having higher health satisfaction than those in extended families may be due to Chinese cultural effects. [source]