Family Identity (family + identity)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Gay Men: Negotiating Procreative, Father, and Family Identities

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2007
Dana Berkowitz
Our qualitative study examines the social psychology of gay men's experiences with their procreative, father, and family identities. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 childless gay men and 20 gay men in the United States who have fathered using diverse means excluding heterosexual intercourse. By focusing on men aged 19 , 55 residing primarily in Florida and New York, our novel analysis illuminates how emerging structural opportunities and shifting constraints shape gay men's procreative consciousness. Findings reveal that gay men's procreative consciousness evolves throughout men's life course, and is profoundly shaped by institutions and ruling relations, such as adoption and fertility agencies, assumptions about gay men, and negotiations with birth mothers, partners, and others. [source]


Communicative Correlates of Satisfaction, Family Identity, and Group Salience in Multiracial/Ethnic Families

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2009
Jordan Soliz
Guided by the Common Ingroup Identity Model (S. L. Gaertner & J. F. Dovidio, 2000) and Communication Accommodation Theory (C. Shepard, H. Giles, & B. A. LePoire, 2001), we examined the role of identity accommodation, supportive communication, and self-disclosure in predicting relational satisfaction, shared family identity, and group salience in multiracial/ethnic families. Additionally, we analyzed the association between group salience and relational outcomes as well as the moderating roles of multiracial/ethnic identity and marital status. Individuals who have parents from different racial/ethnic groups were invited to complete questionnaires on their family experiences. Participants (N = 139) answered questions about relationships with mothers, fathers, and grandparents. The results of the multilevel modeling analyses are discussed in terms of implications for understanding multiracial/ethnic families and family functioning. [source]


We're Decent People: Constructing and Managing Family Identity in Rural Working-Class Communities

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2004
Margie L. Kiter Edwards
Using grounded theory methodology, I establish family identity management as an important type of invisible work that connects women's household-based domestic activities with community members' perceptions and treatment of them and their family members. Detailed observations of household routines and family interactions, as well as in-depth interviews with working-class women living in two rural trailer park communities, provide insight into the meanings women assign to this labor, and their motivations for performing this work. I describe the strategies that women use to accomplish the work, examine how the work supports family life and child development, and explain how the residential environment influences the organization and accomplishment of this work. [source]


Gay Men: Negotiating Procreative, Father, and Family Identities

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2007
Dana Berkowitz
Our qualitative study examines the social psychology of gay men's experiences with their procreative, father, and family identities. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 childless gay men and 20 gay men in the United States who have fathered using diverse means excluding heterosexual intercourse. By focusing on men aged 19 , 55 residing primarily in Florida and New York, our novel analysis illuminates how emerging structural opportunities and shifting constraints shape gay men's procreative consciousness. Findings reveal that gay men's procreative consciousness evolves throughout men's life course, and is profoundly shaped by institutions and ruling relations, such as adoption and fertility agencies, assumptions about gay men, and negotiations with birth mothers, partners, and others. [source]


Psychological functioning in families that blame: from blaming events to theory integration

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 4 2005
Ceri Bowen
Blaming events in therapy were used as a focus for discussions with family therapists in order to examine their construal of the therapeutic process when working with families who blame. Interview transcripts were used as data which were analysed using a qualitative methodology, with a view to building a theoretical model. We present an exploratory model that allows therapists to position their therapy within a broader framework of psychological approaches. When prompted by a video-clip of blaming from the therapy setting, therapists tended to categorize current difficulties in terms of fear and control issues from past relationships and consequent underlying beliefs, and they also described the resultant negative outlook as a direct challenge to therapist idealism. Interestingly, the two themes that emerged from the interview data with the most categories and quotes were ,unhealthy allocation of responsibility for problems', which is arguably the main source of overt blaming, and ,family identity and cohesion', so often a point of contention during therapy. [source]


Communicative Correlates of Satisfaction, Family Identity, and Group Salience in Multiracial/Ethnic Families

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2009
Jordan Soliz
Guided by the Common Ingroup Identity Model (S. L. Gaertner & J. F. Dovidio, 2000) and Communication Accommodation Theory (C. Shepard, H. Giles, & B. A. LePoire, 2001), we examined the role of identity accommodation, supportive communication, and self-disclosure in predicting relational satisfaction, shared family identity, and group salience in multiracial/ethnic families. Additionally, we analyzed the association between group salience and relational outcomes as well as the moderating roles of multiracial/ethnic identity and marital status. Individuals who have parents from different racial/ethnic groups were invited to complete questionnaires on their family experiences. Participants (N = 139) answered questions about relationships with mothers, fathers, and grandparents. The results of the multilevel modeling analyses are discussed in terms of implications for understanding multiracial/ethnic families and family functioning. [source]


Long work hours: a social identity perspective on meta-analysis data

JOURNAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR, Issue 7 2008
Thomas W. H. Ng
The current study utilizes social identity theory to investigate employees' work hours. Specifically, we use meta-analysis to examine the relationships between hours worked and indicators of organizational identity (e.g., organizational support and tenure), occupational identity (e.g., human capital investments and work centrality), and family identity (e.g., family responsibilities and family satisfaction). The meta-analysis also allowed us to explore other important correlates of hours worked (e.g., situational demands, job performance, mental health, and physical health), moderating variables (e.g., age, gender, and job complexity), and curvilinear relationships of work hours to social identity indicators. Overall, we found that occupational factors and situational demands had the strongest relationships with hours worked, hours worked were negatively associated with measures of employee well-being, gender had several significant moderating effects, and there were curvilinear relationships between hours worked and well-being and work,family conflict variables. The article concludes with directions for future theoretical and empirical research. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Routine and ritual elements in family mealtimes: Contexts for child well-being and family identity

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR CHILD & ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT, Issue 111 2006
Barbara H. Fiese
This chapter focuses on how the routine elements of family mealtimes such as assigned tasks and the more emotional ritual aspects such as recognition of feelings are related to children's well-being and the creation of a family identity. [source]


Blood and desire: The secret of heteronormativity in adoption narratives of culture

AMERICAN ETHNOLOGIST, Issue 3 2009
SARA DOROW
ABSTRACT In this article, we use narratives of cultural identity among U.S. parents of children adopted from China to conceptually explore the ideas that underwrite socially intelligible kinship. Although these narratives address the cultural heritage of the child, we find that they also perform a kind of social labor. The ways adoptive parents respond to the "culture question" (their children's birth heritage) also speak to family identity in relation to a foundational imaginary of heteronormative kinship, namely, the equivalence of biological and social family origins. We assert that the "secret" of socially intelligible kinship is revealed in the shifting meanings of blood and social desire in ideas of kinship, which has important implications for new kinship studies as well as for adoption scholarship. [kinship, heteronormativity, adoption, culture, race, desire] [source]