Family Health (family + health)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Assessing the Value of the NHIS for Studying Changes in State Coverage Policies: The Case of New York

HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 6p2 2007
Sharon K. Long
Research Objective. (1) To assess the effects of New York's Health Care Reform Act of 2000 on the insurance coverage of eligible adults and (2) to explore the feasibility of using the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) as opposed to the Current Population Survey (CPS) to conduct evaluations of state health reform initiatives. Study Design. We take advantage of the natural experiment that occurred in New York to compare health insurance coverage for adults before and after the state implemented its coverage initiative using a difference-in-differences framework. We estimate the effects of New York's initiative on insurance coverage using the NHIS, comparing the results to estimates based on the CPS, the most widely used data source for studies of state coverage policy changes. Although the sample sizes are smaller in the NHIS, the NHIS addresses a key limitation of the CPS for such evaluations by providing a better measure of health insurance status. Given the complexity of the timing of the expansion efforts in New York (which encompassed the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks), we allow for difference in the effects of the state's policy changes over time. In particular, we allow for differences between the period of Disaster Relief Medicaid (DRM), which was a temporary program implemented immediately after September 11th, and the original components of the state's reform efforts,Family Health Plus (FHP), an expansion of direct Medicaid coverage, and Healthy New York (HNY), an effort to make private coverage more affordable. Data Sources. 2000,2004 CPS; 1999,2004 NHIS. Principal Findings. We find evidence of a significant reduction in uninsurance for parents in New York, particularly in the period following DRM. For childless adults, for whom the coverage expansion was more circumscribed, the program effects are less promising, as we find no evidence of a significant decline in uninsurance. Conclusions. The success of New York at reducing uninsurance for parents through expansions of both public and private coverage offers hope for new strategies to expand coverage. The NHIS is a strong data source for evaluations of many state health reform initiatives, providing a better measure of insurance status and supporting a more comprehensive study of state innovations than is possible with the CPS. [source]


Predictors of hearing loss in New York farmers

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 1 2001
Syni-An Hwang PhD
Abstract Background Data from the telephone interview portion of the New York Farm Family Health and Hazard Surveillance were used to study self-reported hearing loss in New York farmers. Methods One thousand six hundred and twenty-two persons completed the hearing loss and noise exposure interview. Hearing loss was defined as at least some trouble hearing in one or both ears. Predictors of hearing loss were determined using logistic regression. Results Twenty-two percent of participants reported hearing loss. From the logistic regression, significant confounders are age (P,=,0.0001), gender (P,=,0.0001), being from a livestock farm (P,=,0.012), and loss of consciousness due to head trauma (P,=,0.04). Significant noise exposures are more hours of lifetime exposure to noisy farm equipment (P,=,0.001) and having had a noisy non-farm job (with some hearing protection P,=,0.002, without any hearing protection P,=,0.0001). Conclusions Farm noise exposure is a serious risk to the hearing of this population. Although use of hearing protection should be encouraged, replacing and modifying farm equipment to decrease noise at the source should be the first priority. Am. J. Ind. Med. 40:23,31, 2001. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Perceived Benefits on Family Health of Small Groups for Families With Children

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2007
Arja Häggman-Laitila
ABSTRACT Background: Thus far, international research on small groups has focused on health problems. Research on preventive, resource-, and family-oriented small groups and their impact on family health is scant. Objectives: To describe the experiences of families with small children concerning resource-enhancing small support groups, and to identify the benefits to family health described by participating parents at the end of the group processes. Sample: The study population consisted of parents (n=123) attending 13 small groups. Participants included 63 mothers and 14 fathers (63% response rate). Methods: Data were collected through group interviews. Qualitative content analysis of latent content was the method of analysis. Results: Small groups provided the parents with knowledge about family life and encouraged them to seek information, made them feel refreshed, strengthened their social support networks, enhanced their awareness of their own resources and the different developmental needs at times of change in the family, and increased their confidence concerning their ability to cope. Conclusions: Concepts from this study can be used in the future to construct instruments to evaluate the effectiveness of small groups from the perspective of families and family health. The findings add to our professional understanding of resource-oriented family work from the perspective of families. [source]


Family health effects: complements or substitutes

HEALTH ECONOMICS, Issue 8 2001
Michael Lee Ganz
Abstract Genetic endowments play a fundamental role in the production of health. At birth individuals have different capacities to be healthy, largely due to genetic dispositions. Whether or not individuals realize this health depends on their choice of health behaviours. Previous research has linked negative factors beyond the individual's control, which include genetic endowments, to both poor health and poor health behaviours. The health economics literature proposes that behaviours and genetic (or family health) endowments can be either substitutes or complements in the production of health. The goal of this paper is to investigate the behavioural consequences of changes in knowledge about one's genetic endowment. Using two waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Followup Study, I find that for smokers, smoking intensity substitutes for newly diagnosed smoking-related family cancers, while smoking intensity is complementary to newly diagnosed non-smoking-related family cancers. I find no evidence for the hypothesized relationships with respect to alcohol consumption among drinkers. These results have implications for the growing field of genetic testing and test development. These results also reinforce current practices of ascertaining family health histories in the context of medical history taking. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Determinants of perceived health in families of patients with heart disease

JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 2 2004
Päivi Åstedt-Kurki PhD RN
Background., Heart disease is a severe long-term illness, which often requires lifestyle changes and self-care and affects the life of the whole family. Perceived family health is highly complex. It combines people's values and everyday experiences, such as knowledge about their own health, what they do to promote their health, how their life progresses, and how they feel physically and emotionally. Aim., The aim of this paper is to report a study to describe the perceived health of families of patients with heart disease and to ascertain factors related to family health. Methods., Data were collected by questionnaire with a convenience sample of 161 family members of patients receiving treatment on two medical wards of a university hospital in southern Finland. Data were analysed using means and medians and tested by parametric and non-parametric tests. A stepwise regression analysis was also used. Results., The most important predictors of family health were family structural factors, effect of illness symptoms on daily life, and family relationships. The strongest predictor was family structural factors. It was found that the better the family structure and relationships, the better the family health. Similarly, the greater the effect of the illness on the patient's daily life, the worse the family health. Conclusion., The findings suggest that supporting family functioning in the families of people with heart disease is an important challenge for family nursing. [source]


Implementing a Smoking Cessation Program for Pregnant Women Based on Current Clinical Practice Guidelines

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 6 2002
Lynne Buchanan APRN, PhDArticle first published online: 24 MAY 200
Purpose To describe the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services clinical practice guideline for treating tobacco use and dependence and demonstrate how the guideline was utilized in a pilot program for a small sample of pregnant women (n=20) to help them decrease smoking. Data Sources A convenience sample of 20 pregnant women was recruited from a health maintenance organization at their initial prenatal contact either by telephone or in person. A comparison group of pregnant women (n=28) was used for analysis of outcomes. Conclusions Clinical results showed better outcomes for women in the pilot program when compared to a similar group who did not participate in the program. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in average number of cigarettes smoked per day at delivery and two weeks after delivery with pilot program participants reporting less smoking (p<.05). Women in both groups showed a pattern of returning to smoking after delivery of the baby. Implications for Practice Although a few tobacco users achieve permanent abstinence in first or second attempts, the majority continue to use tobacco for many years and typically cycle through many lapse and relapses before permanent abstinence. Ambulatory care systems need to be developed and funded to treat tobacco use and dependence over the life span. Recognition of the chronic nature of the problem and development of long term care delivery systems are needed to assist clients to achieve goals of permanent abstinence and better personal and family health. This cycle of lapse and relapse before permanent abstinence is typical and demonstrates the chronic nature of tobacco use and dependence and the need for long term follow-up. [source]


Using Home Gardens to Decipher Health and Healing in the Andes.

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2003
Ruthbeth Finerman
Home gardens are a pervasive component of Andean agricultural systems, but have been ignored in anthropological and agronomic research. Recent research in the indigenous community of Saraguro, Ecuador, employed a combination of in-depth interviews, free-listing, videotaped walk-throughs, and mapping to explore the role of home gardens, which are established and controlled by women. Findings reveal that, although gardens offer multiple benefits, they are overwhelmingly devoted to the cultivation of medicinal plants, operating as de facto medicine cabinets that supply women with most of the resources they need to treat family illnesses. Results also suggest that the natural history of home gardens mirrors transformations within the family, and that Saraguro women study the contents of their neighbors' gardens, using this knowledge as a foundation for deciphering the owners' economic and health status. New threats to the sustainability of home gardens threaten the foundation of Saraguro's ethnomedical system and women's authority in the home and community. [ethnobotany, gardens, Ecuador, women healers, family health] [source]


Fathers in situational crisis: A comparison of Asian and Western cultures

NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, Issue 3 2008
Yun-Shan Tseng
Abstract The purpose of this synthesis was to compare the difference between Asian and Western fathers' perceptions of their roles when confronted with situational crises involving their children. Twenty-two studies were reviewed and assigned to one of two categories: the father experiencing a situational crisis related to his child's illness or cultural influences on the paternal role. The results indicated that Asian and Western fathers' perceptions of crises do not differ greatly. It was concluded that there exists a gap in the literature with respect to the knowledge of Asian fathers' situational crisis surrounding their child's illness, their coping strategies when faced with their child's illness, as well as their emotional reactions toward family health. Future research should investigate the single or same-gender father's perceptions and emotional reactions in both Asian and Western cultures. [source]


,Being appropriately unusual': a challenge for nurses in health-promoting conversations with families

NURSING INQUIRY, Issue 2 2008
Eva Gunilla Benzein
This study describes the theoretical assumptions and the application for health-promoting conversations, as a communication tool for nurses when talking to patients and their families. The conversations can be used on a promotional, preventive and healing level when working with family-focused nursing. They are based on a multiverse, salutogenetic, relational and reflecting approach, and acknowledge each person's experience as equally valid, and focus on families' resources, and the relationship between the family and its environment. By posing reflective questions, reflection is made possible for both the family and the nurses. Family members are invited to tell their story, and they can listen to and learn from each other. Nurses are challenged to build a co-creating partnership with families in order to acknowledge them as experts on how to lead their lives and to use their own expert knowledge in order to facilitate new meanings to surface. In this way, family health can be enhanced. [source]


Perceived Benefits on Family Health of Small Groups for Families With Children

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2007
Arja Häggman-Laitila
ABSTRACT Background: Thus far, international research on small groups has focused on health problems. Research on preventive, resource-, and family-oriented small groups and their impact on family health is scant. Objectives: To describe the experiences of families with small children concerning resource-enhancing small support groups, and to identify the benefits to family health described by participating parents at the end of the group processes. Sample: The study population consisted of parents (n=123) attending 13 small groups. Participants included 63 mothers and 14 fathers (63% response rate). Methods: Data were collected through group interviews. Qualitative content analysis of latent content was the method of analysis. Results: Small groups provided the parents with knowledge about family life and encouraged them to seek information, made them feel refreshed, strengthened their social support networks, enhanced their awareness of their own resources and the different developmental needs at times of change in the family, and increased their confidence concerning their ability to cope. Conclusions: Concepts from this study can be used in the future to construct instruments to evaluate the effectiveness of small groups from the perspective of families and family health. The findings add to our professional understanding of resource-oriented family work from the perspective of families. [source]


Health Risk Behavior of Rural Low-Income Expectant Fathers

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2006
Kevin D. Everett
ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess expectant fathers' health risk behaviors and attitudes about pregnancy-related health issues. Pregnancy may be viewed as a teachable moment: a time when women are receptive to health advice and take action to improve their health and the health of their babies. Pregnancy may also be a teachable moment for expectant fathers, although men's behaviors are rarely considered as part of prenatal care or in associated research. Design: Cross-sectional prevalence study. Sample: Rural low-income expectant fathers (N=138) whose pregnant partners had enrolled in a Medicaid managed care health plan. Measurement: A telephone survey measuring five health risk behaviors, sociodemographic variables, and pregnancy- and behavior change-related attitudes. Results: Analyses found the following: 49.3% smoked cigarettes; 30.4% engaged in hazardous drinking in the past month; 27.5% had very low physical activity levels; 94.9% had at-risk fruit/vegetable intake; and 42% had weight-related health risk (25.4% met body mass index [BMI] criteria for obesity). Further, 47.9% of the men engaged in three or more of five assessed health risk behaviors. Conclusions: This sample of expectant fathers engages in high rates of health risk behaviors. Failure to address the health risk behavior of men during prenatal care represents a missed opportunity to improve paternal, maternal, and family health. [source]


Chronic fatigue in adolescence,autonomic dysregulation and mental health: an exploratory study

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 8 2009
Helene Gjone
Abstract Aim:, The present study investigates associations between autonomic cardiovascular dysregulation, psychosocial load and mental health in adolescents presenting with chronic fatigue. Method:, Twenty-two adolescents, mean age 15.7 years (12.7,19.1), underwent a clinical mental health examination as part of a broad medical investigation which included autonomic tests. Adolescents and their parents were also interviewed with regard to psychosocial stress factors, family health and previous illnesses. A count of psychosocial load was made for each adolescent based on the interview. Results:, Of 22 fatigued adolescents in the present sample, 14 had psychiatric diagnoses. There was no significant difference in psychosocial load for the fatigued adolescents classified with normal autonomic regulation compared to those with deviant or borderline autonomic regulation. The present psychiatric diagnosis did not differ between the two groups. In a subsample, there was a significant negative association between depressive symptoms and abnormal blood pressure responses during orthostatic challenge. Conclusion:, No significant psychiatric or psychosocial differences between fatigued adolescents with or without autonomic dysregulation were found in this study. The trends towards higher psychosocial load and greater burden of depressive symptoms in fatigued adolescents with normal autonomic regulation warrant further studies. [source]