Family Forms (family + form)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Small Samples, Big Challenges: Studying Atypical Family Forms

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2005
Simon Cheng
We discuss the challenges of small-subsample sizes that family scholars often encounter when studying nontraditional or less common family types. We begin by identifying the general difficulties of using existing data in this line of research and then discuss potential solutions that may help researchers to avoid these problems. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, we use the example of monoracial White, monoracial Asian, and Asian/White interracial families to illustrate these problems and available, albeit imperfect, solutions. [source]


Toward a Theoretical Basis for Understanding the Dynamics of Strategic Performance in Family Firms

ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Issue 6 2008
James J. Chrisman
An important distinction between family and nonfamily firms and among different types of family firms is the manner in which strategy is formulated and implemented. These differences in strategic behaviors can cause variations in firm performance. Understanding the nature of these differences and how the family form of organization drives them therefore contributes to the development of a strategic management theory of the family firm, a unifying theme of the series of special issues published in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice to date. This article briefly reflects on the progress made in understanding the strategic differences of family firms in this ongoing series and discusses the contributions of the articles and commentaries contained in this fifth special issue on theories of family enterprise. [source]


MOTHERING, FATHERING, AND DIVORCE: THE INFLUENCE OF DIVORCE ON REPORTS OF AND DESIRES FOR MATERNAL AND PATERNAL INVOLVEMENT*

FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
Seth J. Schwartz
The present study investigated the extent to which young adults' reports of,and desires for,maternal and paternal involvement differed between intact and divorced families. An ethnically diverse sample of 1,376 young adults completed measures of reported and desired mothering and fathering across 20 parenting domains. Results indicated that both reports of and desires for father involvement differed sharply by family form (intact versus divorced), whereas few family form differences emerged for reported or desired mother involvement. These findings are discussed in terms of implications for custody and access decisions within the family court system. [source]


Searching for wages and mothering from Afar: The case of Honduran transnational families

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 5 2004
Leah Schmalzbauer
This article draws on data from a 2-year two-country study that included 157 people to explore the survival strategies of poor Honduran transnational families. I argue that transnational families, defined as those divided between two nation-states who have maintained close ties, depend on a cross-border division of labor in which productive labor occurs in the host country and reproductive labor in the home country. This article bridges the literatures on transnationalism and families. The transnationalism literature tends to focus on macro processes, whereas the literature on families assumes proximity. This research helps fill the gap in both literatures, exposing the ways in which processes of economic globalization have radically altered family form and function. [source]


THE DIVIDED WORLD OF THE CHILD: DIVORCE AND LONG-TERM PSYCHOSOCIAL ADJUSTMENT

FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2010
Gordon E. Finley
This study evaluated the extent to which divorce creates the "divided world of the child," as well as consequences of this "divided world" for long-term adjustment. An ethnically diverse sample of 1,375 young-adult university students completed retrospective measures of parental nurturance and involvement, and current measures of psychosocial adjustment and troubled ruminations about parents. Results indicated that reports of maternal and paternal nurturance and involvement were closely related in intact families but uncorrelated in divorced families. Across family forms, the total amount of nurturance or involvement received was positively associated with self-esteem, purpose in life, life satisfaction, friendship quality and satisfaction, and academic performance; and negatively related to distress, romantic relationship problems, and troubled ruminations about parents. Mother-father differences in nurturance and involvement showed a largely opposite set of relationships. Implications for family court practices are discussed. [source]


Parental Rights in Diverse Family Contexts: Current Legal Developments,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 4 2002
Denise A. Skinner
Here, we review case law as it applies to parental rights. Specifically, we examine two issues: (a) Who has been awarded the right to parent? and (b) What rights have been bestowed to parents? The review demonstrates how family law in the United States reflects and perpetuates society's ambivalence about family structure and, subsequently, parental rights and responsibilities. On the basis of this analysis, we recommend a broadened legal perspective that not only communicates society's expectation of responsible parenting but, in addition, gives legal recognition to diverse family forms in which members carry out these responsibilities. [source]


Historical Perspectives on Family Studies

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2000
Stephanie Coontz
This article explores the relationship of historical research to contemporary family studies. Family history was influenced greatly by fields such as sociology and anthropology, leading it to make several contributions to those fields in turn. The continuing collaboration of these disciplines can significantly enrich current family research, practice, and policy making. History's specific contribution lies in its attention to context. Although historical research confirms sociologic and ethnographic findings on the diversity of family forms, for example, it also reveals that all families are not created equal. The advantage of any particular type of family at any particular time is constructed out of contingent and historically variable social relationships. Historical research allows researchers to deepen their analysis of family diversity and family change by challenging widespread assumptions about what is and what is not truly new in family life. Such research complicates generalizations about the impact of family change and raises several methodological cautions about what can be compared and controlled for in analyzing family variations and outcomes. [source]


Beyond Material Explanations: Family Solidarity and Mortality, a Small Area-level Analysis

POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
Jon Anson
Social solidarity, being embedded in a network of binding social relationships, tends to extend human longevity. Yet while average incomes in the Western world, and with them, life expectancies, have risen dramatically, the second demographic transition has occasioned a breakdown in traditional family forms. This article considers whether these trends in family life may have slowed the rise in life expectancy. I present a cross-sectional analysis of Israeli statistical areas (SAs), for which I construct indexes of Standard of Living (SOL), Traditional Family Structure (TFS), and Religiosity (R). I show that (1) increases in all three of these indexes are associated with lower levels of mortality, (2) male mortality is more sensitive to differences in SOL and TFS than is female mortality, and (3) net of differences in SOL and TFS, there is no difference in the mortality levels of Arab and Jewish populations. [source]


Intergenerational Coresidence in Developing Countries

POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW, Issue 2 2008
Steven Ruggles
Newly available census microdata from IPUMS-International are used to assess trends in intergenerational coresidence in 15 developing countries. Contrary to expectations, we find no general decline in intergenerational coresidence over the past several decades. There have been, however, significant changes in the configuration of intergenerational coresidence. Families in which a member of the older generation is household head,a configuration consistent with traditional patriarchal forms in which the older generation retains authority,are becoming more common in most of the countries. Intergenerational families headed by a member of the younger generation,the configuration one would expect if intergenerational coresidence were motivated by a need for old-age support,are on the decline in most of the countries. Multivariate analysis reveals that intergenerational families headed by the older generation are positively associated with measures of economic development. These findings are at variance with widely accepted social theory. We hypothesize that housing shortages, economic stress in the younger generation, and old-age pensions may contribute to the change. More broadly, in some developing countries rising incomes may have allowed more people to achieve their preferred family structure of intergenerational coresidence following traditional family forms. [source]


Spaces of silence: single parenthood and the ,normal family' in Singapore

POPULATION, SPACE AND PLACE (PREVIOUSLY:-INT JOURNAL OF POPULATION GEOGRAPHY), Issue 1 2004
Theresa Wong
Abstract Alternative family forms have begun to emerge in the Confucian societies of East and Southeast Asia, concomitant with widespread demographic changes and new socioeconomic conditions. In Singapore, the state tends to configure ,single parents' , including divorcees, unmarried parents and widowed parents , as ,unfortunate' and constituting an unhealthy trend, in opposition to the normal, dual-parent household. This paper examines how single parents in Singapore reconfigure their definitions of the family both discursively and through practical means, in response to the ,traditional', Confucian concept of the complete family propounded by the government. Through in-depth interviews with middle-class Chinese Singaporean single mothers and fathers, this paper also explores how single parents employ strategies at two levels: in practical decisions relating to childcare; and discursively, through the articulation of remarriage and fertility desires, in which patriarchal notions of the roles of husband/wife and mother/father are embedded. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


What is in a family?

CHILDREN & SOCIETY, Issue 5 2002
Adolescent perceptions
The ways in which adolescents conceptualise families is not well understood. In this study perceptions of families by 232 adolescents were examined using vignettes describing groupings of people (e.g. married couple with children, two women and a child). Eighty per cent or more endorsed married and cohabiting families, lone-parent households, and extended family members as families. Few differences were found according to their own family structure. Asian (Chinese) adolescents were less likely overall to endorse groupings as families. Love and affection were given as primary criteria for being a family. Overall, young people endorsed a diversity of family forms. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]