Family Farms (family + farm)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences


Selected Abstracts


Family Farms: Survival and Prospect.

GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH, Issue 3 2009
A World-wide Analysis
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


The growth of family farms in Hungary

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, Issue 2009
Lajos Zoltán Bakucs
Gibrat's Law; Family farm; Quantile regression; Transition agriculture Abstract The article investigates the validity of Gibrat's Law for Hungarian family farms using FADN data collected between 2001 and 2007. Gibrat's Law states that the growth rate of firms will be independent of their initial size. Regression results allow us to reject Gibrat's Law for all quantiles. Evidence suggests that smaller farms tend to grow faster than larger ones. Results do not support the hypothesis of "disappearing middle" in Hungarian agriculture. We study a number of socio-economic factors that can help to explain farm growth. We find that total subsidies received by a farm and the farm operator's age are the most significant factors correlated with farm growth. [source]


Days on the family farm: from the golden age through the great depression , By Carrie A. Meyer

ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
David Danbom
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Tobacco is Going, Going , But Where?

CULTURE, AGRICULTURE, FOOD & ENVIRONMENT, Issue 2 2009
Donald D. Stull
Abstract Tobacco is America's most vilified agricultural product. It is also the eighth most valuable crop in the United States, and its immense economic value and historic depth made it an agricultural cornerstone and a cultural focus in the Upper South. The federal tobacco program limited production and ensured a fair price to growers, helping many small family farms survive at no net cost to the American taxpayer. Kentucky ranks second in tobacco production and is the most tobacco-dependent state. This paper examines what has happened to tobacco farmers in western Kentucky since the federal tobacco program was terminated in 2004 and its broader implications. [source]


Strategies of family farms to strengthen their resilience

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND GOVERNANCE, Issue 4 2010
Ika Darnhofer
Abstract Resilience thinking offers a framework to emphasize dynamics and interdependencies across time, space and domains. It is based on understanding social,ecological systems as complex, and future developments as unpredictable, thus emphasizing adaptive approaches to management. In this paper the four clusters of factors that have been identified as building resilience in large-scale social,ecological systems are applied at the farm level. Suggestions on how these factors could be operationalized at the farm level are derived from workshops held with family farmers in Austria. The results show that farmers understand change as unpredictable and unfolding, have a number of strategies to ensure the flexibility and adaptability of their farm and build extensive networks to diversify information and income sources. However, these strategies, while ensuring adaptability and transformability, compete for scarce resources. The farmers thus face trade-offs between strategies that ensure the adaptive capacity of their farm over the long term and those ensuring profitability over the short term. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


He Came, He Saw, He Stayed.

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, Issue 2 2000
Guest Worker Programmes, the Issue of Non-Return
Critics of guest worker programmes have pointed out that many temporary workers do not return home when their contracts expire and thus end up swelling the ranks of undocumented workers in a host country. This article argues that this outcome is not inevitable. Whether or not guest workers return home or stay behind depends to a large extent on how the guest worker programme is administered. By comparing the US Bracero Program with the Canadian Mexican Agricultural Seasonal Workers' Program, it is shown that three aspects of programme administration account for why so many Braceros stayed in the US illegally, while almost all temporary workers employed in Canada return to Mexico at the end of the season. The three aspects are recruitment policies and procedures, enforcement of employment and housing-related minimum standards, and the size of the programme. It is suggested that the administration of the programme, in turn, reflects various interests that shape the State's position on foreign labour. Whereas in the US the Bracero Program was tailored to meet the needs of agribusinesses, the Canadian state responds to a wider variety of interests, including its own concern with the definition of ideal citizenship, as well as the need to protect domestic workers and the Mexican Government's interest in assisting those who are most needy. Additionally, unlike the US, where braceros were employed mainly in agribusinesses, in Canada Mexicans are brought to work on family farms. While desertion was a frequent phenomenon in the US, the paternalistic relationships that Canada-bound workers develop with their employers make desertion unlikely. [source]


Changing Patterns in Family Farming: The Case of the Pampa Region, Argentina

JOURNAL OF AGRARIAN CHANGE, Issue 3 2009
CARLA GRAS
In the past few decades, Argentine agriculture has been significantly reorganized. Changes include the marked growth of export production, the need for an increasing level of capital investment and technological incorporation into farms and the restructuring of public intervention. This paper examines the dynamics of farm exit and the adjustments made by capitalized family farmers in the Pampa region. We suggest transformations in family farms are the result of a substantial shift in their main characteristics which historically combined the use of family labour, a certain accumulation capacity and ownership status. In particular, we will discuss the different and changing patterns of farm operations and the adjustments made with respect to work and land tenure. [source]


The Chilean Agrarian Transformation: Agrarian Reform and Capitalist ,Partial' Counter-Agrarian Reform, 1964,1980

JOURNAL OF AGRARIAN CHANGE, Issue 1 2007
Free-Market Neoliberalism, Part 1: Reformism, Socialism
This article, which is published in two parts, is an empirical analysis of the Chilean agrarian reform (1964,1973) and ,partial' counter-agrarian reform (1974,1980). Its aim is to explain and interpret their logic and the changes they brought to Chile's agrarian property regime in particular and Chilean life in general. Chile's agrarian reform was successful in expropriating (under the Frei and Allende administrations, 1964,1973) the great estates of the hacienda landed property system. The capitalist ,partial' counter-reform then redistributed them (under the military, 1974,1980). CORA, the country's agency for agrarian reform, expropriated and subsequently redistributed 5809 estates of almost 10 million hectares, or 59 per cent of Chile's agricultural farmland. A large amount of the expropriated land (41 per cent) benefited 54,000 peasant households with small-sized family farms and house-sites. The rest of the farmland benefited efficient and competitive commercial farmers and agro-business and consolidated medium-sized farms. Of central concern is the role of the agrarian reform and subsequent ,partial' counter-reform processes in fostering the transformation of the erstwhile agrarian structure of the hacienda system toward agrarian capitalism. The redistribution of the agricultural land previously expropriated made possible the formation of an agro-industrial bourgeoisie, small commercial farmers, an open land market and a dynamic agricultural sector. While, however, under military rule, a selected few benefited with family farms and became independent agricultural producers, a large majority of reformed and non-reformed campesinos were torn from the land to become non-propertied proletarians in a rapidly modernizing but highly exclusionary agricultural sector. [source]


The growth of family farms in Hungary

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, Issue 2009
Lajos Zoltán Bakucs
Gibrat's Law; Family farm; Quantile regression; Transition agriculture Abstract The article investigates the validity of Gibrat's Law for Hungarian family farms using FADN data collected between 2001 and 2007. Gibrat's Law states that the growth rate of firms will be independent of their initial size. Regression results allow us to reject Gibrat's Law for all quantiles. Evidence suggests that smaller farms tend to grow faster than larger ones. Results do not support the hypothesis of "disappearing middle" in Hungarian agriculture. We study a number of socio-economic factors that can help to explain farm growth. We find that total subsidies received by a farm and the farm operator's age are the most significant factors correlated with farm growth. [source]


Lost in the Supermarket: The Corporate-Organic Foodscape and the Struggle for Food Democracy

ANTIPODE, Issue 3 2009
Josée Johnston
Abstract:, The corporatization of organics has been critiqued for the concentration of ownership, as well as the ecological consequences of the long distances commodities travel between field and table. These critiques suggest a competing vision of food democracy which strives to organize the production and consumption of food at a proximate geographic scale while increasing opportunities for democratically managed cooperation between producers and consumers. This paper examines how the corporate-organic foodscape has interacted and evolved alongside competing counter movements of food democracy. Using discourse and content analysis, we examine how corporate organics incorporate messages of locally scaled food production, humble origins, and a commitment to family farms and employees, and explore some of the complexity of the corporate-organic foodscape. This paper contributes to the understanding of commodity fetishism in the corporate-organic foodscape, and speaks more generally to the need for sophisticated understandings of the complex relationship between social movement innovation and market adaptation. [source]


Do family farms really converge to a uniform size?

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE ECONOMICS, Issue 1 2010
The role of unobserved farm efficiency
We analyse the growth of family farms in Israeli cooperative villages during a period of economic turmoil. We use instrumental variables to account for the endogeneity of initial farm size, and correct for selectivity as a result of farm survival. We also include a technical efficiency index, derived from the estimation of a stochastic frontier production model, as an explanatory variable. Our aim is to check whether ignoring efficiency could have been the reason for convergence results obtained elsewhere in the literature. We found that technical efficiency is an important determinant of farm growth, and that not controlling for technical efficiency could seriously bias the results. In particular, larger farms are found to grow faster over time, while without controlling for technical efficiency the farm growth process seemed to be independent of initial farm size. The increasing polarisation of farm sizes in Israel has ramifications for the inefficiencies induced by the historical quota system, for the political power of the farm sector and for the social stability of farm communities. [source]