Family Dynamics (family + dynamics)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Acculturation and Latino Family Processes: How Cultural Involvement, Biculturalism, and Acculturation Gaps Influence Family Dynamics,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 3 2008
Paul R. Smokowski
Abstract: This study investigated how adolescent and parent acculturation (culture-of-origin and U.S. cultural involvement, biculturalism, acculturation conflicts, and parent-adolescent acculturation gaps) influenced family dynamics (family cohesion, adaptability, familism, and parent-adolescent conflict) in a sample of 402 Latino families from North Carolina and Arizona. Multiple regression and hierarchical linear models suggested that culture-of-origin involvement and biculturalism were cultural assets related to positive outcomes, whereas acculturation conflict was inversely related to positive family dynamics and positively related to parent-adolescent conflict. Parent-adolescent acculturation gaps were inversely associated with family cohesion, adaptability, and familism but were unrelated to parent-adolescent conflict. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed. [source]


Economic Disadvantage, Family Dynamics, and Adolescent Enrollment in Higher Education

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2002
Robert Crosnoe
This study applies a family process model to the linkage between early economic disadvantage and later enrollment in higher education. Using two waves of data on low-income youth, the authors found that the attitudes and behaviors of their parents, mostly mothers, mediate the impact of disadvantage on enrollment. Economically disadvantaged parents are less optimistic about their adolescents' educational chances and, in turn, engage less in the proactive parenting that promotes enrollment. The authors also found that parents' perceived efficacy buffers against the more negative consequences of disadvantage that can influence their adolescents' educational trajectories. Group comparisons reveal few differences by gender or ethnicity. [source]


Family dynamics and postnatal depression

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2004
T. TAMMENTIE mnsc rn
Research has shown that postnatal depression (PND) affects 10,15% of mothers in Western societies. PND is not easily identified and therefore it often remains undetected. Untreated depression has a detrimental effect on the mother and child and the entire family. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the state of family dynamics after delivery and whether the mother's PND was associated with family dynamics. The study used a survey covering the catchment area of one Finnish university hospital. Both primi- and multiparas took part and data were collected using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for mothers and the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) for both mothers and fathers. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical programme and frequency and percentage distributions, means and standard deviations were examined. Correlations were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The significance of any differences between mothers' and fathers' scores was determined with a paired t -test. Of the families participating in the study (373 mothers and 314 partners), 13% of the mothers suffered from PND symptoms (EPDS score of 13 or more). As a whole, family dynamics in the families participating in the study were reported to be rather good. However, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics compared with other families. With the exception of individuation, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics than their partners. With the exception of role reciprocity, non-depressed mothers reported more positive family dynamics than their partners. Knowledge of the association of mothers' PND with family dynamics could help to develop nursing care at maternity and child welfare clinics and maternity hospitals. Depressed mothers and their families need support to be able to make family dynamics as good as possible. [source]


Acculturation and Latino Family Processes: How Cultural Involvement, Biculturalism, and Acculturation Gaps Influence Family Dynamics,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 3 2008
Paul R. Smokowski
Abstract: This study investigated how adolescent and parent acculturation (culture-of-origin and U.S. cultural involvement, biculturalism, acculturation conflicts, and parent-adolescent acculturation gaps) influenced family dynamics (family cohesion, adaptability, familism, and parent-adolescent conflict) in a sample of 402 Latino families from North Carolina and Arizona. Multiple regression and hierarchical linear models suggested that culture-of-origin involvement and biculturalism were cultural assets related to positive outcomes, whereas acculturation conflict was inversely related to positive family dynamics and positively related to parent-adolescent conflict. Parent-adolescent acculturation gaps were inversely associated with family cohesion, adaptability, and familism but were unrelated to parent-adolescent conflict. Limitations and implications for practice are discussed. [source]


"I was more her Mom than she was mine:" Role Reversal in a Community Sample,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 1 2004
Ofra Mayseless
Family processes associated with childhood role reversal and related adult outcomes were examined in a community sample (128 adults) using a semistructured interview exploring family, friend, and romantic relationships. Women showed stronger role reversal than men, and role reversal was stronger with mothers than with fathers. Role reversal of women with mothers was associated with parental divorce, neglect, and rejection. Only parental divorce was consistently associated with men's role reversal. Role reversal was not associated with current symptoms for either men or women, nor with attachment orientations for women. Three patterns with distinct family dynamics and outcomes,guardians/protectors, pleasers/compliants, and spousified,emerged from qualitative analyses of 16 women who experienced high levels of childhood role reversal. [source]


Perceptions of constructive and destructive conflict within and across family subsystems

INFANT AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 5 2003
Christina M. Rinaldi
Family members' (mothers, fathers, siblings) perceptions of the frequency and types of constructive and destructive conflict strategies used within and across the three family subsystems (marital, parent,child, sibling) were investigated. Participants included 60 fifth- and sixth-grade, middle-class white children, their closest-in-age sibling, and both parents. Each family member rated their perceptions of conflict resolution strategies employed in marital, parent,child, and sibling relationships. Overall, family members demonstrated agreement on the frequency and types of conflict within the three family subsystems and generally reported employing similar conflict tactics across different subsystems. Additionally, parent,child conflict strategies were partially linked to both constructive and destructive sibling and marital conflict. These results are best understood in light of both the shared family perspective view and the spillover hypothesis of family dynamics (Margolin et al., 1996; Minuchin, 1988). Implications for examining conflict strategies within and across subsystems are discussed within the context of recent theory on family functioning. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Recent evidence on the development and maintenance of constructive staff,family relationships in the care of older people , a report on a systematic review update

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EVIDENCE BASED HEALTHCARE, Issue 2 2010
Emily Haesler BN PgradDipAdvNsg
Abstract Aim, This paper is an update to a systematic review that presents the best available evidence on the factors that are most effective in promoting constructive staff,family relationships in the care of older people in the institutional healthcare setting. Methods, Systematic review. Results, The updated review supports findings from the earlier review. Additional evidence points to the importance of monitoring care, family involvement in decision-making, staff upholding the uniqueness of the older person, trust, the involvement of the multidisciplinary care team and family dynamics as factors underpinning effective staff,family relationships. Conclusion, A number of factors critical to the development and maintenance of positive staff,family relationships in the institutional setting have been identified. The delivery of quality care is predicated on staff having an understanding of these factors. [source]


Culture, Structure, and the Refugee Experience in Somali Immigrant Family Transformation

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION, Issue 1 2010
Elizabeth Heger Boyle
This analysis suggests a theoretical refinement of migrant acculturation theories to deal specifically with refugee acculturation experiences. Using the case of family dynamics among Somali refugees in Minnesota, we find that the same factors that are theorized to affect voluntary migrants are also important for refugees. Specifically, the nature of exit from the sending society, the reception in a new location, and group characteristics all appear to be important. However, within the category of exit from the sending society, there are specific concerns that will be more relevant to refugees than to "voluntary" migrants. Specifically, the ongoing condition of the sending society and the effects of any transitions on transnational ties are critically important in the refugee context. We demonstrate how the societal upheaval that created the Somali refugee community also affected culture and connections within Somalia, and how this has an ongoing impact on the US Somali refugee community. We argue that it is valuable to refine the acculturation framework when considering refugees. [source]


The evolution of family interventions for schizophrenia.

JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2006
A tribute to Gianfranco Cecchin
Family intervention for schizophrenia has informed the whole history of family therapy, although in different fashions. This presentation will deal with the main phases of such intervention, outlining the characteristic features of each one. We can roughly divide the history of family intervention for schizophrenia into four phases: Phase 1 , Conjoint family therapy (1955,1965). Family interventions were aimed at modifying family communication patterns, implying the possibility of a definitive resolution of psychopathology. Phase 2 , Antipsychiatry (1965,1975). This, rather than a treatment model, was a philosophy of psychiatry, which considered schizophrenia as an epiphenomenon of the distortions of Western society. Family treatment was aimed at promoting the awareness of such a dynamic. Phase 3 , Milan systemic therapy (1975,1985). The systemic model was aimed at helping people with schizophrenia to recognize their position within their families (and other significant systems), giving all family members a new sense of their relationships to each other. Phase 4 , Psychoeducation (1985,2005). In most psychoeducational models, schizophrenia was conceived of as a biologically determined disorder. Psychoeducation was a way of helping the not diagnosed family members to cope with problems brought about by the illness, eliciting consensus towards psychiatric treatments such as medication and rehabilitation. A fifth phase of family intervention for schizophrenia is probably developing right now. If this is happening it should probably be an integrative phase, in which different approaches to family dynamics might be bridged and blended, in order to give more effective help to all members of families with schizophrenia. [source]


Parenting and Adolescents' Sexual Initiation

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2009
Monica A. Longmore
This study draws on social control and social learning theories to examine the role of dating-specific attitudes and practices as predictors of adolescents' sexual initiation. We include attention to the adolescent's reaction to control attempts as a further means of assessing family dynamics (i.e., frequency of dating disagreements). The study uses longitudinal data from 697 adolescents who were not sexually active at the first interview as well as separate interviews with parents. In models that include all parenting variables, parental caring, parents' preferences that the child should delay sex, and the frequency of dating disagreements were significant predictors of initiation of teen sexual activity. [source]


Stable Postdivorce Family Structures During Late Adolescence and Socioeconomic Consequences in Adulthood

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 1 2008
Yongmin Sun
Using four waves of panel data from 6,954 American young adults in the National Education Longitudinal Study, we compare the long-term socioeconomic consequences of growing up in two types of divorced families. Our findings show that the negative socioeconomic consequences of growing up in unstable postdivorce families are at least twice as large as those of staying in a stabilized postdivorce family environment through late adolescence. The study also finds that variations in parental resources during late adolescence partially explain the divorce effects on most attainment indicators. Further, parental divorce appears to affect the socioeconomic attainment of male and female offspring alike. Overall, the study underlines the importance of including postdivorce family dynamics in studying the effect of parental divorce. [source]


College Women's Plans for Different Types of Egalitarian Marriages

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2007
Francine M. Deutsch
This study examined college women's plans for egalitarian marriages. One hundred and forty-four heterosexual undergraduate women completed surveys about their preferences for different life scenarios and their attitudes about work and family life. The pattern of their preferences showed a distinction between home-centered, balanced, and job-centered egalitarian families. Regressions showed that gender ideology, ideas about parenting and motherhood, career orientation, and family dynamics were associated differentially with the three types of egalitarian families, which reflected the different values that underlay the pursuit of each. The results also cast doubt on whether outsourcing is truly an egalitarian path. Outsourcing domestic labor may simply be a means for women to pursue careers without achieving real equality in families. [source]


Child, Parent, and Situational Correlates of Familial Ethnic/Race Socialization

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 1 2007
Tony N. Brown
This study examines child, parent, and situational correlates of familial ethnic/race socialization using nationally representative data gathered as part of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998 , 1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K sample (N = 18,950) includes White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, American Indian, and multiracial kindergarteners, with survey data available at the child, parent/guardian, teacher, and school level. We find that child correlates such as race and gender, parent correlates such as education and warmth of parent-child relationship, and situational correlates such as percent of minorities at the child's school and cultural event participation influence how often family members discuss children's ethnic/racial heritage with them. We advocate for continued research of contextualized family dynamics. [source]


Family dynamics and postnatal depression

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2004
T. TAMMENTIE mnsc rn
Research has shown that postnatal depression (PND) affects 10,15% of mothers in Western societies. PND is not easily identified and therefore it often remains undetected. Untreated depression has a detrimental effect on the mother and child and the entire family. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the state of family dynamics after delivery and whether the mother's PND was associated with family dynamics. The study used a survey covering the catchment area of one Finnish university hospital. Both primi- and multiparas took part and data were collected using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for mothers and the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) for both mothers and fathers. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical programme and frequency and percentage distributions, means and standard deviations were examined. Correlations were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The significance of any differences between mothers' and fathers' scores was determined with a paired t -test. Of the families participating in the study (373 mothers and 314 partners), 13% of the mothers suffered from PND symptoms (EPDS score of 13 or more). As a whole, family dynamics in the families participating in the study were reported to be rather good. However, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics compared with other families. With the exception of individuation, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics than their partners. With the exception of role reciprocity, non-depressed mothers reported more positive family dynamics than their partners. Knowledge of the association of mothers' PND with family dynamics could help to develop nursing care at maternity and child welfare clinics and maternity hospitals. Depressed mothers and their families need support to be able to make family dynamics as good as possible. [source]


Mother,Child Conflict and Sibling Relatedness: A Test of Hypotheses From Parent,Offspring Conflict Theory

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON ADOLESCENCE, Issue 2 2010
Gabriel L. Schlomer
Parent,offspring conflict theory (POCT) has been underutilized in studies of human family dynamics. An implication of POCT is that the presence of siblings will increase conflict in biological parent,child dyads, and that half siblings will increase that conflict more than full siblings. Evidence consistent with this prediction was found in a longitudinal study of 236 early adolescent children and their mothers. Following parental disruption, the entry of younger maternal half siblings into the home was uniquely associated with elevated conflict between mothers and their biological children, independent of the effects of family size, socioeconomic status, and maternal depression. As predicted by the model, the effect of parental disruption on mother,child conflict was partially mediated by the entry of half siblings (but not stepfathers) into the home. [source]


Value of Children and Family Change: A Three-Decade Portrait From Turkey

APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 3 2005
Cigdem Kagitcibasi
L'étude turque sur la valeur conférée aux enfants a porté sur trois générations relevant de trois niveaux socio-économiques dans centre métropolitain et deux zones rurales. Les résultats ont montré qu'il y avait sur les trois derrières décennies un net accroissement des valeurs psychologiques attribuées aux enfants et une chute correspondante des valeurs utilitaires et économiques. La préférence pour le fils a été remplacée par la préférence pour la fille, ce qui traduit un changement de la dynamique et des rôles familiaux. Des modifications analogues dans ce qui est attendu des enfants, les qualités que l'on souhaite trouver chez cux et les nombres réels, désirés et idéaux d'enfants sont cohérents avec les attentes; le modèle du changement familial proposé par Kagitcibasi est ainsi confirmé. Les comparaisons des valeurs attribuées aux enfants sur les trois décennies par génération et niveau social aide à comprendre l'évolution et le changement social de la société turque, voire de sociétés comparables. The Turkish Value of Children Study consisted of three generations from three socioeconomic strata in a metropolitan center and from two rural areas. The findings showed a sharp increase in the psychological, and a corresponding decrease in the utilitarian/economic values attributed to children over the last three decades. Son preference has been replaced by daughter preference, pointing to changing family dynamics and family roles. Corresponding modifications in expectations from (adult) children, qualities desired in children, and actual, desired, and ideal numbers of children are in line with expectations, providing support for Kagitcibasi's Model of Family Change. Comparisons of values attributed to children over three decades and across generations and social strata provide insights for understanding social change and development in Turkish society and possibly in similar societies. [source]


The needs of terminally ill cancer patients versus those of caregivers for information regarding prognosis and end-of-life issues,

CANCER, Issue 9 2005
Josephine M. Clayton M.B. B.S.(Hons)
Abstract BACKGROUND The difficulty of negotiating the concerns of family members while also respecting the needs of the patient adds complexity to the task of discussing prognosis and end-of-life (EOL) issues with terminally ill cancer patients. The informational needs of caregivers may be different from those of the patients themselves with regard to these topics. However, to the authors' knowledge, this issue has received relatively little research attention. METHODS The authors conducted focus groups and individual interviews with 19 patients with far advanced cancer and 24 caregivers from 3 palliative care (PC) services in Sydney and 22 PC health professionals (HPs) from around Australia. The focus groups and individual interviews were audiotaped and fully transcribed. Additional focus groups or individual interviews were conducted until no additional topics were raised. The participants' narratives were analyzed using qualitative methodology. RESULTS The participants had varying views regarding whether patients and caregivers should be told different information concerning prognosis and EOL issues. Three themes were identified from the transcripts regarding meeting the informational needs of both the patients and caregivers: 1) the importance of consistency and openness, 2) the specific information needed to care for the patient, and 3) the value of having separate discussions with the patient and caregiver. A desire to restrict the patient's access to information by the caregiver or vice versa was reported by the HPs to be one of the most challenging issues when discussing prognosis and EOL issues. Three themes were identified with regard to this issue: 1) autonomy versus protection, 2) negotiating family dynamics, and 3) difficulty using interpreters. CONCLUSIONS The results of the current study emphasized the importance of considering the distinct informational needs of caregivers, as well as those of the patient, when discussing prognosis and EOL issues. Cancer 2005. © 2005 American Cancer Society. [source]