Family Diversity (family + diversity)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Family Diversity in 50 Years of Storybook Images of Family Life

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES RESEARCH JOURNAL, Issue 1 2002
Nancy M. Rodman
Storybooks are cultural artifacts and part of children's normative socialization. Content analysis of the 100-book sample of picture storybooks about daily family life published between 1943 and 1993 revealed no significant differences among time periods in frequency of appearance of different family types nor of different ethnicities. The dominant family images portrayed across 50 years and in each time period were the traditional nuclear and the Caucasian family. The diversity in families of real children should be reflected in fictional picture storybooks about family life. [source]


Books and Materials Reviews

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2003
Article first published online: 17 FEB 200
Demo, D. H., Allen, K. R., and Fine, M. A. (Eds.). (1999). Handbook of Family Diversity. Golombok, S. (2000). Parenting: What Really Counts? Hewlett, S. A., Rankin, N., and West, C. (Eds.) (2002). Taking Parenting Public: The Case for a New Social Movement. Kozol, J. (2000). Ordinary Resurrections: Children in the Years of Hope. Krovetz, M. L. (1999). Fostering Resiliency: Expecting All Students to Use Their Minds Well. Lee, E. E. (2000). Nurturing Success: Successful Women of Color and Their Daughters. [source]


Teasing Out the Lessons of the 1960s: Family Diversity and Family Privilege

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2000
Stephen R. Marks
The tumult of the 1960s brought new strains of cultural relativism. I survey the continuing impact of some of these strains on family studies, focusing especially on the study of family diversity as an offshoot of the relativistic project. A dominant discourse still drives much of our work, however, and I illustrate it with some recent examples. The diversity agenda is hampered too often by unintended erasures of large categories of people in nondominant family arrangements. As a corrective to this tendency, I propose an agenda to study family privilege and entitlement, that is, to treat it as a "social problem" much as we treat poverty or juvenile delinquency. I illustrate with my own narrative of how I learned privilege and entitlement growing up male in a White, Jewish, upper-middle-class family. I end with some recommendations about how we might bring this agenda into our research and writing. [source]


Chromatin-remodelling proteins of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)

INSECT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, Issue 2010
S. D. Rider Jr
Abstract Aphids display extraordinary developmental plasticity in response to environmental cues. These differential responses to environmental changes may be due in part to changes in gene expression patterns. To understand the molecular basis for aphid developmental plasticity, we attempted to identify the chromatin-remodelling machinery in the recently sequenced pea aphid genome. We find that the pea aphid possesses a complement of metazoan histone modifying enzymes with greater gene family diversity than that seen in a number of other arthropods. Several genes appear to have undergone recent duplication and divergence, potentially enabling greater combinatorial diversity among the chromatin-remodelling complexes. The abundant aphid chromatin modifying enzymes may facilitate the phenotypic plasticity necessary to maintain the complex life cycle of the aphid. [source]


Families With Children and Adolescents: A Review, Critique, and Future Agenda

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2010
Robert Crosnoe
This decade's literature on families with children and adolescents can be broadly organized around the implications for youth of family statuses (e.g., family structure) and family processes (e.g., parenting). These overlapping bodies of research built on past work by emphasizing the dynamic nature of family life and the intersection of families with other ecological settings, exploring race/ethnic diversity, identifying mechanisms connecting family and child/adolescent factors, and taking steps to address the threats to causal inference that have long been a problem for family studies. Continuing these trends in the future will be valuable, as will increasing the number of international comparisons, exploring "new" kinds of family diversity, and capturing the convergence of multiple statuses and processes over time. [source]


Teasing Out the Lessons of the 1960s: Family Diversity and Family Privilege

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2000
Stephen R. Marks
The tumult of the 1960s brought new strains of cultural relativism. I survey the continuing impact of some of these strains on family studies, focusing especially on the study of family diversity as an offshoot of the relativistic project. A dominant discourse still drives much of our work, however, and I illustrate it with some recent examples. The diversity agenda is hampered too often by unintended erasures of large categories of people in nondominant family arrangements. As a corrective to this tendency, I propose an agenda to study family privilege and entitlement, that is, to treat it as a "social problem" much as we treat poverty or juvenile delinquency. I illustrate with my own narrative of how I learned privilege and entitlement growing up male in a White, Jewish, upper-middle-class family. I end with some recommendations about how we might bring this agenda into our research and writing. [source]


Historical Perspectives on Family Studies

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 2 2000
Stephanie Coontz
This article explores the relationship of historical research to contemporary family studies. Family history was influenced greatly by fields such as sociology and anthropology, leading it to make several contributions to those fields in turn. The continuing collaboration of these disciplines can significantly enrich current family research, practice, and policy making. History's specific contribution lies in its attention to context. Although historical research confirms sociologic and ethnographic findings on the diversity of family forms, for example, it also reveals that all families are not created equal. The advantage of any particular type of family at any particular time is constructed out of contingent and historically variable social relationships. Historical research allows researchers to deepen their analysis of family diversity and family change by challenging widespread assumptions about what is and what is not truly new in family life. Such research complicates generalizations about the impact of family change and raises several methodological cautions about what can be compared and controlled for in analyzing family variations and outcomes. [source]


A Conscious and Inclusive Family Studies

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 1 2000
Katherine R. Allen
I argue that family scholars must take bolder steps to engage the tensions between our heritage of positivist science and its postmodern challenges. I also argue that constructing theories, utilizing research methods, and examining substantive issues should be relevant to the diversity of the families we study and to ourselves as members of families. I offer examples of developing an informed reflexive consciousness to broaden the rationalist foundation that dominates family scholarship. For a more inclusive, balanced, and invigorated family studies, our subjective experiences and commitments as researchers should be acknowledged, confronted, and integrated. A family studies that is responsible to our readers, students, selves, and the people whose lives we study requires that we engage the critical intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and age as they define family diversity. [source]


Young Adulthood as a Factor in Social Change in the United States

POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW, Issue 1 2006
Michael J. Rosenfeld
This essay compares family change during two periods of social and historical upheaval in the United States: the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century and the more recent family changes of the late twentieth century. Despite the manifest social and demographic changes brought about by the industrial revolution, some aspects of family life remained unchanged. Almost all new families formed in the United States before and during the industrial revolution were same-race heterosexual marriages. In the past half-century, however, family diversity has become the new rule; interracial marriages and extramarital cohabitation have both risen sharply. A key to understanding the lack of family diversity in the past and the recent rise in diversity is the changing nature of young adulthood. [source]